Moving to SSD? Possible, Worth It?

nheather

Distinguished Member
Here's my situation.

My PC has a single 500GB disk patitioned as follows:

C: 150GB (but less than 120GB used)
D: 350GB

Windows 7 64bit on C: as are most of my applications.

Games and stuff on D:


If I defragment my current disk and get a 120GB SSD is it a simple enough matter to replace the C: drive with the SSD, and when it is working extend the D: patition so that it covers the whole of the mechanical disk?

I figure it would be something like this

Clone C: drive to SSD

I'm assuming that would then boot as the primary drive and the mechanical version wouldn't being the secondary drive.

Then I've read that you have to align the SSD using a Linus application to get the best performance - something about the storage structure being different on an SSD.

If all fails I can always pull the SSD and go back to the mechanical.

Then when happy, delete the old C: partition and extend the old D: partition.

Would that work?


Next question - is it worth it?

I appreciate that it is faster, but at the moment I never find myself thinking "MS Word is so slow, I wish it would hurry up"

What will I see in real terms.

The other thing is that I'm close to filling the 500GB, though I'm sure there is a load of junk I could get rid of. The extra 120GB would probably be enough.

Or would I be best just forgetting about the SSD idea and just replacing the 500GB with a 1TB.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

jro7563

Active Member
First off I'm no IT expert, but in my honest opinion with regards to changing to an SSD drive I would say yes, go for it, I've got a 240 gig SSD as my main system drive and a 1 TB drive purely for storage, I was amazed at the speed increase in everything from boot up to programs loading/running.

John.
 

MarkE19

Moderator
Personally I would recommend doing a clean install of Win7 onto the SSD rather than a clone of the old C: partition. Over time any install gets clogged up - just a clean install on the existing HDD is likely to run faster. Also an SSD should get recognised by the Windows installer and make some changes to the way it runs.

Until recently I thought an SSD of a reasonable size was too expensive, but they have come down a fair bit. So a couple of months back I got a Samsung 830 series SSD along with 500Gb & 2Tb HDD's for data.
Prior to the SSD install it took me about 4 minutes from power on to a stable PC, but now it boots in around 30 seconds with all the same programs installed - shutting down is also a lot quicker.
This guide to installing an SSD may help: http://www.avforums.com/forums/pc-gaming/1631845-ssd-installation-configuration-guide.html

Mark.
 

STdrez625

Banned
Your problem is that your C part is at or near the full capacity of an 120/128 SSD. I expect you will see the difference but will find yourself wanting more space on the C drive. I would suggest a re-insall of windows and maybe installing bigger progs to the hard drive. AFAIK SSD's are fitted as simply as any hard disk .. no need for anything fancy.
But beware of reinstalling windows and AHCI mode(BIOS) that will/disallow your backup from booting or being recognized.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the advice.

No way am I going to do a reinstall. I understand what you guys are saying but I have a stable installation at the moment with loads of applications and data loaded.

Doing a full install now would just seem to me to be a load of un-unecessary work.

If that is what it takes to move to SSD then I'm going to pass for now.

Maybe reconsider when it is time to change OS or the one I have starts running badly.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
Last edited:

mdbarber

Active Member
if you did a clean install on the 500GB it wont be as easy as that, don't forget win7 creates a hidden system partition and that will need transferred as well plus the new disk will need to be made active, so u need to do that with command line if you dont have a bootable cd/usb with a disk/partition manager.
Performance wise it will be worth it but ssds are not up to the uber reliability of mechanical hdds which have had decades of development so a good contingency plan is essential
what ever amount of ram you have installed can be tripled by unnecessary windows functions like pagefile and hibernate file, these can be disabled or minimised in your new setup reclaiming twice the amount of your ram from hdd usage eg 8GB ram,= 16GB use from swap and hiber files.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the advice.

No way am I going to do a reinstall. I understand what you guys are saying but I have a stable installation at the moment with loads of applications and data loaded.

Doing a full install now would just seem to me to be a load of un-unecessary work.

If that is what it takes to move to SSD then I'm going to pass for now.

Maybe reconsider when it is time to change OS or the one I have starts running badly.

Cheers,

Nigel
Have you thought about cloning across to the SSD? And yes definitely do it. It's well worth the move.

I would all data that can be moved to other disks (music, photos, videos, random junk). Then use a disk managing program (like Acronis etc) to clone your current C:\ to the SSD. It's all wizard based, so it should be relatively easy mate :smashin:
 

mdbarber

Active Member
Have you thought about cloning across to the SSD? And yes definitely do it. It's well worth the move.

I would all data that can be moved to other disks (music, photos, videos, random junk). Then use a disk managing program (like Acronis etc) to clone your current C:\ to the SSD. It's all wizard based, so it should be relatively easy mate :smashin:

read the above post m8, your idea may be a recipe for disaster.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
read the above post m8, your idea may be a recipe for disaster.
Not really. Any decent imaging program will take that into account. And if it doesn't. You can just use DISKPART to re-create the "hidden" partition. Or even a standard Windows 7 setup DVD.
 

mdbarber

Active Member
no your post didn't tell him to do all that it which is not so straight forward anyway,
it simply told him to clone the c: partition over and that would be bad.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
no your post didn't tell him to do all that it which is not so straight forward anyway,
it simply told him to clone the c: partition over and that would be bad.
:confused: So you are now essentially arguing about nothing. I never said my post told him that. But I have clarified that any decent imaging program would alert him to the fact that Windows 7 uses a "hidden" partition to store it's booting data. And would offer to clone that too.

It wouldn't be bad at all. Worst case scenario is that Nigel clones C:\ over to SSD. It doesn't boot, so he takes out the SSD, and replaces the C:\. Hey presto back to normal.
 

mdbarber

Active Member
i'm not arguing about anything i'm just stating fact, you gave him poorly worded advice that could lead a novice into a complex pickle, maybe simple for you, not so for a novice who asks about whether ssds are worth the effort
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
When I open disk management under admin tools on windows 7 I can see that my current drive is made up of 3 partitions

System Reserved - 100MB
Main C: - 146GB
Data D: - 319GB

I had assumed that I would just clone the 'System Reserved' and the 'C:' partitions across to the SSD

The existing drive would then become D: and E:

And then when I was happy with the SSD I would delete the partition for D: and then extend E: - the resultant would then become D:

Cheers,

Nigel
 

mdbarber

Active Member
When I open disk management under admin tools on windows 7 I can see that my current drive is made up of 3 partitions

System Reserved - 100MB
Main C: - 146GB
Data D: - 319GB

I had assumed that I would just clone the 'System Reserved' and the 'C:' partitions across to the SSD

The existing drive would then become D: and E:

And then when I was happy with the SSD I would delete the partition for D: and then extend E: - the resultant would then become D:

Cheers,

Nigel

that would probably do fine but you would need to make sure the disk was set active which most cloning software has the option for but sometimes it can be not so obvious and rarely default.
 

mdbarber

Active Member
make sure you read the comments after that article, the journalist had made a few errors which one of which could be anti-productive bigtime and the second just plain time wasting but they are covered in the comments from the quick read i gave it.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
make sure you read the comments after that article, the journalist had made a few errors which one of which could be anti-productive bigtime and the second just plain time wasting but they are covered in the comments from the quick read i gave it.
Which one?
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
I assume it is where he sligns the SSD before cloning and assumes that the cloning software will respect that alignment.

It is mentioned that some do whilst others don't but doesn't advise which is which.


Cheers,

Nigel
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
Well seeing as it's all predominantly wizard based, I don't see any major pitfalls. And if you do encounter any problems then stick the old HDD back in. I'd do it myself if I had any space :eek:
 

mrk1283

Active Member
Acronis True Image 2012 is what I used to clone my Win7 x64 to SSD back in November. It was the only software that could successfully migrate over AND align the file system accordingly so that it best optimises SSD performance.

Since then I have upgraded SSD a 2nd time from 120GB to 256 and had no issues again.

You might be able to borrow just the bootable TrueImage 2012 CD off someone who has ATI 2012 as you only need to boot off the disc to get into ATI's system.
 

PowerLee

Active Member
I fitted an SSD a few months ago as the system drive & did a fresh reinstall of Windows 7, it doesnt take long with an SSD, all the updates download & install very quickly & the reboot time is very quick as well.

I wouldnt trust cloning an old mechanical hard drive over to an SSD.
 

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