Moving away from SLR

andyk

Active Member
I've realised that I hardly ever use my SLR any more - basically down to weight and the fact I've always got my phone with me. This is a shame as I enjoyed the 'arty' side of photography. I'm thinking of selling it all and getting a bridge camera instead. Any recommendations?

To give a sense of where I'm at, my current kit list is
Canon 600D
Canon 24-105 f4L
Canon 10-22
Canon 50 f1.8
Tamron 70-300

I'd probably put this lot up for sale on the classifieds here after a bit of research on prices

Thanks
Andy
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
The one's twist suggested are the only bridge cameras I'd even consider. With their 1" type sensor at least there's a bit of hope of getting subject isolation and shallow DOF.

Have you thought about getting a compact system camera instead, significantly less bulk than a DSLR whilst maintaining a larger sensor.
 

newbie1

Distinguished Member
Before you take the plunge, have you thought through whether this will make the difference?

In practice I have found I have 4 options:
1. Camera phone - always have this it takes quite good pictures but has limits.
2. Rx100 or TZ in a pocket - most days I have one of these. TZ has the superzoom good in daylight, RX100 the rest of the time.
3. Messenger bag with dslr and spare lens. This is normal kit when outdoors, walking or skiing.
4. Rucksack with dslr, couple spare lens, tripod, filters, cable release, flash etc. when out to get a planned shot.

As far as I can see a bridge or compact camera system would still need to be carried around in a messenger bag or similar? Correct me if I'm wrong on that, but leaves me wondering if I would use it more than dslr option 3?
 

andyk

Active Member
The one's twist suggested are the only bridge cameras I'd even consider. With their 1" type sensor at least there's a bit of hope of getting subject isolation and shallow DOF.
Isn't shallow DOF a result of large aperture lens rather than sensor size?
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
Isn't shallow DOF a result of large aperture lens rather than sensor size?
There's several things that effect depth of field, aperture, subject distance and sensor size. Well there's plenty of conflict as to whether sensor size actually effects DOF or whether it's due to having to be closer to the subject to get the same frame. Either way, the net result is that like for like you get shallower DOF using bigger sensors.
 

AMc

Distinguished Member
EOS M with an adapter and keep your lenses? You'd cut down on bulk but keep the same sensor size.

Fwiw I went from a full size dslr to micro 4/3rds. My whole kit fits in a very small bag and it made me much happier to take my camera out and about.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
Isn't shallow DOF a result of large aperture lens rather than sensor size?
This is opening a can of worms but keeping it simple, an 'equivalent' focal length on a smaller sensor size is shorter than the one it is equivalent to and short focal lengths have greater depth of field. As an example a Sony RX100Mk4 has a 24-70mm equivalent focal range but the lens is actually an 8.8mm to 25.7mm lens so the actual focal lengths are much shorter than an APS-C camera with a 24-70mm equivalent lens or a full frame camera. With short focal lengths even with a bright aperture it's difficult to get decent shallow depth of field compared to cameras with bigger sensors.

John
 

SanPedro

Well-known Member
I bought my partner a Panasonic GM5 for Christmas and this thing is tiny compared to my RX10. It's ideal for just slipping into a pocket or small bag. Add in the 35-100 (70-200 equiv) zoom, also tiny, and a bright prime and you're covered. All of which takes up less space than a typical DSLR just on it's own. And being M4/3 you could build a really useable system around it in the future ie mix n match different bodies/lenses to suit your shooting requirements.
 

andyk

Active Member
I like the look of these suggestions. I think I would miss a viewfinder though so that limits options
 

KePa

Active Member
It depends what you are after ... what do you shoot? The Panasonic LX-100/Leica D-Lux is a very good compact. If you don't mind a fixed lens, then a used Sony RX1 or RX1R are full frame with an outstanding Zeiss 35mm f2 lens. I had the Sony RX100 mk3 with has a built in EVF which was very handy on holiday in New York and Barcelona. Most cameras nowadays are good enough and more than good enough in some cases. Or slightly larger, a Fuji XT-1 is great, a mini DSLR, with an excellent lens selection and quality. Stick a 35mm or 50mm equivalent, just carry on a shoulder strap instead of a bag, and you're good to go!
 

jamski07

Active Member
I love my FZ1000, take a look at my Flickr.I still have an old SLR with a 50mm lens, but most the newer shots are from the FZ1000.

James Austin
 

jamski07

Active Member
In fact, this album is all from the Lumix. :)

FZ1000
 

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