Moved in to new house, previous owners had no TV, how to install?

noclueabouttv

Novice Member
Hello
I've just moved houses to an old, Victorian Terrace. The previous owners had no TV and so there are no TV points anywhere in the house, nor an areal.
Perhaps a silly question - but how do you install a TV point and are there any restrictions on where it can be? Also, the house is in a very strict conservation area where you need planning permission even for a satellite dish, we are not sure if this would extend to a TV aerial too. We are only looking to get 'regular' Freeview TV, would that need an aerial or these days is that no longer necessary?
Thank you in advance!! Clearly a bit clueless here!
 

Rodders53

Distinguished Member
the house is in a very strict conservation area where you need planning permission even for a satellite dish, we are not sure if this would extend to a TV aerial too.
a Tv aerial and a satellite dish are both 'antennas'
suggests that you can install both if required without needing permission but do double check first!

Often the Councils don't like them to be visible from the road (or broads, if applicable); and it is often possible to minimise visibility with a bit of care.

Ask your new neighbours how they get TV, and whether they've had to jump through hoops to have any antennas installed.

Planning Your Install - A.T.V. Poles, Brackets, Clamps & Aerials is a good place to start reading and has a wealth of information on other pages of the site. Freely given by the owner of the business.

Location?
Approx postcode within 100m of your home for better accuracy: school, church, shop, pub etc.,. - we don't want your own!
That'll allow reception predictions and estimation of the type of UHF TV aerial you might need. Loft aerials can work ok in some places; but other need larger outside aerials and masthead amplification.

Avoid the 'contract' aerial and what Justin of ATV calls 'bacofoil' aerials. The broadcasters use (admittedly rugged versions of log periodic designs for reception and transmission.

Cables from the aerial to the TV are often best left as one continuous length and are usually tacked to the external wall, entering the house through a small hole drilled through.

Quality all-copper double screened cable is a must.

Aerial installers: go for a recommendation from family, friends, neighbours if possible. Some councils have 'trusted trader' lists. Last the aerial trade associations may give some 'comfort' when selecting an installer.
 

noclueabouttv

Novice Member
a Tv aerial and a satellite dish are both 'antennas'
suggests that you can install both if required without needing permission but do double check first!

Often the Councils don't like them to be visible from the road (or broads, if applicable); and it is often possible to minimise visibility with a bit of care.

Ask your new neighbours how they get TV, and whether they've had to jump through hoops to have any antennas installed.

Planning Your Install - A.T.V. Poles, Brackets, Clamps & Aerials is a good place to start reading and has a wealth of information on other pages of the site. Freely given by the owner of the business.

Location?
Approx postcode within 100m of your home for better accuracy: school, church, shop, pub etc.,. - we don't want your own!
That'll allow reception predictions and estimation of the type of UHF TV aerial you might need. Loft aerials can work ok in some places; but other need larger outside aerials and masthead amplification.

Avoid the 'contract' aerial and what Justin of ATV calls 'bacofoil' aerials. The broadcasters use (admittedly rugged versions of log periodic designs for reception and transmission.

Cables from the aerial to the TV are often best left as one continuous length and are usually tacked to the external wall, entering the house through a small hole drilled through.

Quality all-copper double screened cable is a must.

Aerial installers: go for a recommendation from family, friends, neighbours if possible. Some councils have 'trusted trader' lists. Last the aerial trade associations may give some 'comfort' when selecting an installer.
Thank you so much - v useful!
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Our house when we moved in had no working TV antenna and due to the work we needed to do we did not install the antenna for about 12-18 months until the livingroom was ready.

We used a laptop connected to the TV via HDMI and watched freeview via that and these days you can get Netflix & Sky Go, etc streamed without any need for an aerial.

We too live in a conservation area and what counts for more restrict or not is up for debate.
We can make changes to the back of the house without any permissions (double glazing, bi-folds, etc) but the front of the house is a real pain in the ass and we cannot do much.

We had the antenna installed on the roof without any need to ask for permissions. I would suggest going outside and looking at the properties round about for what they have on their roof. Most houses have antenna attached to the chimney stack (if you have one) and that is where ours was installed, I then got the cable run down the back of the house and I had it installed under the floor of the house and into an AV cupboard near livingroom.

We also had Sky installed a few years ago and rather than going on the roof in winter when it was dangerous they used what I think is called an "S" pole that attached to the wall at the rear of the house and extended up to clear the roofline, which prevents anyone from the conservation complaining about it as it is at the rear.

Also my understanding is these things are temporary so can be removed at a later date and conservation people will be just wanting to make sure about it not looking garish.
 

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