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Mounting on stud partition walls

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by ianh64, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. ianh64

    ianh64
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    For the builders and engineers out there, is there any difference in strength between vertical studs and the horizontal studs in a stud partition wall?

    I have not yet surveyed my wall yet, but the chance of a vertical stud being in the right place for my wall mount is slim, but I am fairly confident in finding a horizontal stud that I can use.

    If I can't get near a suitable stud - I am bounded by shelves so I have little or no room for positioning, what is the best way of strengthening the wall. Presumably MDF or a suitable size screwed inthe any available studs?

    Its a Loewe wall mount - haven't seen it yet, but I understand its probably quite narrow and tall.

    -Ian

    -Ian
     
  2. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    Hi Ian,

    Normally the vertical timber is stronger since when it is built it is wedged into place plus it has the weight of upstairs and the screws keeping it in place. The noggings that go between are also wedged in but they are there to brace the uprights and unless they have bee screwed correctly into the uprights, might not be strong enough.

    You can get a 'beam finder' from Wickes or Jewsons or similar to find where the beams are through the plasterboard, failing that, the cheaper option is to drill through the wall and move across 2" until you find a beam. The distance between uprights are normally 12-14".

    HTH,

    Richie.
     
  3. gilesm

    gilesm
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    Hi Ian

    Had the same dilemma a couple of weeks ago. Luckily for me, my lounge backs on to some cupboards so I had the luxury of being able to take out some plaster board to see what was there. It's probably a good job I did. The horizontal studs were only just 'hanging' in, they were too short and you could see the nails they'd used in a gap. Also there were only two nails holding the horizontal studs. Also the vertical ones were in the wrong place.

    Had no idea how much the Spheros was going to weigh so I built essentially a wooden tray, used standard batton stuff for the sides. Found some spare wodden cladding the builders had used on the front of the house - about 3/4 inch thick, and then screwed the tray sides into the vertical studs so the bottom of the tray was touching the plaster board.

    The Spheros wall bracket has six holes to screw through and these went straight through the boards, and is really very very solid now. Glad I looked actually, the cross studs definately wouldn't have held it

    Giles
     
  4. pacman

    pacman
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    Hi Ian,

    Would agree with Richie's comments. However, in my stud wall the uprights were at least 600mm apart although. Luckily I found one in the middle of the wall and then I kept moving outwards until I found one either side.

    I inserted two 100mm x 50mm x 600mm beams between the uprights and then placed blocks under each end of the beams to add additional support. I tested the supports by hanging on them - I weigh 75Kg and each side held my weight without any movement.

    Everything was then covered with a liberal helping of Bonding (available at builders merchants) and plaster to finish.

    Hope this helps

    Peter
     
  5. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Hi Giles

    Nothing in the instructions to explain how to align the bracket. Im working within fairly tight tolerances in the vertical, about 1". I currently have a table top stand. Do you think that it would be safe to align the bottom of the wall bracket with the existing mounting point on the table top stand?

    If I use a 6" by 2" batton secured to the surrounding stud work, do you think it will be enough or would the screw holes of the bracket be too close to the edge and split the wood? I actually wan't to mount it a couple of inches proud of the wall since I want to make a duct either side of the wall bracket to allow warm air to escape from the TV cabinet below that houses the media box. Its going to be baffled so it does not affect the panel itself.

    What screws did you use? I need to secure the batton to the wall and the bracket to the batton.

    Also, how may people helped you? Loewe recommend 3 people to lift the unit! I recon I could lift the Xelos (its lighter than the Spheros and only 32") on my own but im not sure about feeding the wires.

    If you have any more tips, it tomorrows project!

    -Ian
     
  6. gilesm

    gilesm
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    Hi Ian

    Sounds like you're about to have some fun, I take it you've now got the wall bracket? My TVs up now, but the bracket is 6 inches wide by 11 inches tall and the TV stands 2 inches proud of the wall when fitted (at the bottom, it's at a 5 degree angle - not sure if thats adgustable). It has 6 holes, and their centers 11cm from each other vertically, and 12cm horizontally (2 wide 3 down). The bottom of the bracket on my spheros fits into a gap at the bottom of the TV (the bracket is in two parts, one fits to the TV, the other to the wall then they just slot together), so the bottom of the bracket will be (give or take a couple cms) be the lowest point on the wall. Ours is mounted 120cm up to the bottom of the TV / bracket.

    I had my Hifi company come and fit it, just 2 of them, and me hindering where I could. One of the guys could hold it himself, but he was straining heavily. To get it on the wall bracket it took the two of them to lift it and me to feed the cables through the wall. The cable incidentally doesn't feed through the bracket, it has to go to one side. Also the plugs loewe use are these dodgy tamper proof things, thus making the hole in the wall even larger - luckily covered by a TV now. Actually getting the TV and the bracket to locate appeared to be a little tricky, it basically slots in and you have to lift it over the bracket, although thats probably the height we have ours mounted (which in hindsight is probaby about 20 cm too high).

    For fixing as I say I made a tray and used Screwfix Turbogold 5mm * 70mm to hold the bracket through the plaster board and into my tray, and a large washer bracket side of the wall, there was certainly plenty of length there and they are phenominally strong too.

    As for tips, makesure you get the bracket dead level, as it's only 6 inches wide, and it's goto support a meter width (in my case) any slight deviation will mean the TVs not straight - very annoying, mines out very slightly so when I take it off the wall next I'm going to adjust it slightly.

    If you want I've got some pictures but not sure how much use they'll be, as I say I had the luxury of removing a large piece of plaster board from the cupboard behind it.

    Hope that helps anyway, and good luck :thumbsup:

    Giles
     

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