Mount speakers on which wall to annoy neighbours least?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by kingnothing83, Dec 29, 2016.

  1. kingnothing83

    kingnothing83
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    438
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +22
    We are moving soon and looking to build a small kitchen diner downstairs extension. I'd like to wall mount the tv and Dali Kubik One sound bar on the wall which will give least disturbance to neighbours.

    The house is a Victorian terrace and the neighbours both sides have already build similar extensions.

    So the options are to place on:
    1) existing plasterboard wall which is a party wall to neighbours kitchen diner (from original 1900 or so building)
    2) newly built brick wall (we are going for a bare brick effect) which is a party wall to neighbours kitchen diner in a newly built side return. Neighbour on that side had just finished building a slide return too so both these walls are new

    Would either wall be better at not transmitting sound?

    Thanks

    Simon
     
  2. kingnothing83

    kingnothing83
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    438
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +22
    Bump!

    It's a boring question I know but any thoughts welcome
     
  3. Thresherinc

    Thresherinc
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    Messages:
    243
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Tring
    Ratings:
    +76
    Do the two new walls have an air gap? If they do, I'd use that one.
     
  4. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    Interesting. I had a solid party wall with an open chimney breast. TV noise was audible from my neighbours but very quiet. No other noises could be heard.

    We have just taken out the chimney and 'sealed' the room. In addition to the wall I have had fitted 12mm acoustic plasterboard, skimmed and painted with an air gap in between. For whatever reason I can now hear the TV more and occasionally other noises.
     
  5. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    That's annoying for you. Do you have any idea of what could have caused it?
     
  6. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    Not really unfortunately. Could the air gap act as a reverberating chamber, amplifying the noise in a similar way to how a violin works? That’s really the only thing I can think of.
     
  7. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    It's possible. How is the Plaster board fixed? Did you use stud work? And if so then how is that fixed?
     
  8. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    It was dot and dabbed but using the soundbloc board inbetween, i.e. dot > plasterboard off cut > dot > main plasterboard.
     
  9. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    That's unfortunate as there is now a clear path for sound to travel from the original wall through to the outer layer of Plaster board which is probably acting like a soundboard and amplifying the original sound. There's not a lot you can do now. If the problem is very annoying the best thing to do would be to rip it all down and start again but read some of the soundproofing threads on here first. It might be possible to dampen some of the sound vibrations using green glue or Tecsound then a 3rd layer of 15mm Acoustic Plaster board but there's no way of knowing whether this would reduce the sound level enough for it to be worthwhile.
     
  10. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    The plasterboard is supposedly meant to dampen down the sound. I would have thought that having the offcuts between the original wall and the new plasterboard wall would have broken up that path.
     
  11. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    ...also if the board is amplifying the sound would it work the other way too or would it reduce the sound for our neighbours (I'm thinking grammar phone in reverse)?
     
  12. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    Plasterboard is quite rigid and transmits vibrations extremely well. Your Dot & Dab and offcuts of plasterboard will have done nothing to reduce sound passage from the original wall. Your new plasterboard should have been installed so that it was 'decoupled' from the party wall.
     
  13. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    How does acoustic board differ from regular plasterboard then?

    I understand that decoupling would have been the best way, just not sure how you actually do that.
     
  14. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    Acoustic Plaster board is denser than regular Plaster board so it blocks and absorbs a little more sound. One layer of Acoustic Plaster board isn't going to make much difference on its own as it needs to be combined with other products and methods to maximise sound reduction. Better to use 2 layers of 15mm Acoustic Plaster board with a layer of green glue or mass loaded vinyl in between. To decouple a wall from a party wall you would fasten it to the ceiling, floor and possibly the return walls and have no attachments to the party wall at all. You need a gap between the walls of at least 25mm. There are plenty of build threads on this forum which tell you exactly how to do it.
     
  15. N1ck

    N1ck
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +18
    Ok thanks. We have only just had our room done and I value my marriage to much to do any of the above just yet, haha. On the plus side there is a 25mm - 50mm gap between the wall and the plasterboard. I guess it’s just the dots that are causing the issue.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2017

Share This Page

Loading...