Monopole or Bipole??

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by le hutch, Jun 19, 2001.

  1. le hutch

    le hutch
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Firstly my setup is as follows

    Arcam DV88 DVD and AVR100 Receiver
    Monitor Audio silver 9i fronts and 12i centre.

    I took some 3i monopole and FXi bipole speakers home over the weekend for a demo, and have come the the following (basic) conclusion...

    Monopoles have more bass

    and

    Bipoles sound louder....

    Thats what it comes down to! I'm swaying towards the bipoles because even when I set the rears to thier highest setting, the mono's dont sound loud enough.

    One question though...as the frequency range for the Bipoles is 55hz to 25khz, what is the frequency range for DD and DTS for the rear speakers?

    Ta!
     
  2. Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    DD and DTS 5.1 have full bandwidth on rears (20hz-20khz i believe)
    DD EX and DTS ES have full bandwidth for side surrounds with a "shelved" bandwidth for back surround.
    DTS ES Discrete has full bandwidth for all 6 (of 6.1) channels.
     
  3. Reiner

    Reiner
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2000
    Messages:
    3,316
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    Germany
    Ratings:
    +13
    Hm, interesting conclusion.

    Both actually would depend on the construction and make of the speaker, but bipoles do have the advantage of more bass over dipoles, hence they might present the best alternative between those and monopoles, i.e. providing reasonable bass but also a wrapping effect.
    Monopoles are perhaps most effective for multi-channel music.

    As for the "louder" issue the same IMHO applies, it depends on the speaker design which is directly reflected in the sensitivity (dB) stated, i.e. the higher the easier the speaker is to drive.

    In any case the volume of all speakers should be balanced first using a SPL meter and tweaking the settings (volume level for each channel) at the amp.
    If that is not done the conclusion of bipoles being louder would not be correct or rather cannot be generalised.
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice