Monitor audio silver 6 or 8??

TheDeuce

Active Member
Hi all,

For quite some time now I have been a MA fan. I started with a 5.1 radius setup, then 7.1. Then grabbed a couple of bronze floorstanders for the music! I just love the way MA do things and I feel the fundamentally good engineering and passion is evident in the end product.

But now I have a dilemma! I covet the current silver floorstandars. But 6 or 8? And it's not a simple question as my room is small and the 8's are a perhaps too bassy. But the 6's, whilst right for the room, are only 2.5 way, not 3 way. And I don't think anyone will ever be able to convince me that anything other than a true full range speaker is 'as good in a different way'.

So what's the real trade off here in your view? Manage the bass for the sake of the full range prowess? Or go to the 6 and lose some of the fidelity for the sake of choosing a speaker to fit the room?

I'm sure many reading this will want to suggest a different, smaller 3 way speaker - but my mind is made up. The silvers suit my ears and I genuinely support what MA have pursued as a company. It has to be one of the two. And cost isn't a factor as both are frankly cheaper than anything else comparable, especially if you take aesthetics into consideration.

Tough one.. help?
 

TheDeuce

Active Member
Additional: the speakers will be driven by my trusty marantz. MA plus Marantz is a damn good combo imo. And whichever speakers I go for, will be second hand.

And if I may jump ahead... yes I know the silver's can be a little bright. It's hard to find a MA review that doesn't contain the word bright. But for me the Marantz tempers it well enough and the occasional brightness actually works for me - it wakes me up so that I keep listening for the other 90% that the silver's just do so perfectly!
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Which Marantz??

The Silver 8 are 4 ohms because they have TWO full time Bass drivers. The Silver 6, to the best of my knowledge, are 8 ohms.

But it is about determining how much you need. In a 2.0 system, I see a real advantage to having two bass drivers and a midrange. And the bass drivers in both speakers, 6 and 8 are 6". So, not a lot of difference, and I'm thinking of the size of the room here. If a room will accommodate one it is likely to accommodate the other.

But you are right TWO full time 6" bass drivers will give you noticeable more bass. Only you can determine how much is too much.

Silver 6

Silver 8

The Silver 6 are rated at 35hz which is decent.

The Silver 8 are rated at 32hz, which is better.

Silver 6 = 8 ohms nominal

Silver 8 = 4 ohms nominal

I don't think there is a bad choice. It is just a matter of working out the priorities in your space.

The 4 ohm rating might be a consideration depending on how strong your amp is.

Steve/bluewizard

Steve/bluewizard
 
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TheDeuce

Active Member
Which Marantz??

The Silver 8 are 4 ohms because they have TW Ofull time Bass drivers. The Silver 6, to the best of my knowledge, are 8 ohms.

But it is about determining how much you need. In a 2.0 system, I see a real advantage to having two bass drivers and a midrange. And the bass drivers in both speakers, 6 and 8 are 6". So, not a lot of difference, and I'm thinking of the size of the room here. If a room will accommodate one it is likely to accommodate the other.

But you are right TWO full time 6" bass drivers will give you noticeable more bass. Only you can determine how much is too much.

Silver 6

Silver 8

The Silver 6 are rated at 35hz which is decent.

The Silver 8 are rated at 32hz, which is better.

Silver 6 = 8 ohms nominal

Silver 8 = 4 ohms nominal

I don't think there is a bad choice. It is just a matter of working out the priorities in your space.

The 4 ohm rating might be a consideration depending on how strong your amp is.

Steve/bluewizard

Steve/bluewizard

Yes the 8s are 4ohm and the 6s 8 ohm. But the amp should be fine in either case, it's the SR7007, I checked the true specs as tested here: Marantz SR7007 A/V Receiver HT Labs Measures (which for once are actually very close to the quoted outputs - well done Marantz)!!

It's also worth saying that the 8's if I get them, wouldn't be part of the 7.1 setup. That will remain all radius speakers, with the floorstanders used only for music. So there won't be any mixing of speakers with wildly different resistance.

I have heard the 8s demo'd and was very happy. The 6s are probably more room appropriate in many ways but they aren't a true 3 way speaker. It's a shame but I'm sure MA had their reasons for that choice. The 8s I heard, the crossover between drivers was imperceptible for the most part. I'm just worried that won't be the case with the 6s...
 

droidlike

Active Member
2 1/2-Way vs 3 Way

my local MA dealer asked for me this specific question to local MA tech_rep
and the reply was :

both formats have 2 cross-overs

silver-6
2 1/2-Way cross-over format
==================
LF: 700Hz drives 1 x 6" RST® Bass driver only, from 0Hz up to 700Hz, then cut everything up
MF/HF: 2.7kHz drives 1 x 6" RST Bass/Mid driver only from 0Hz to 2.7KHz , then cup everything up

the 1 x 1" (25mm) C-CAM® gold dome tweeter start from 2.7KHz and go up to 35kHz
(maybe it has only a proper series capacitor as a simple and efficient high-pass filter)

3 Way cross-over format
================
LF/MF: 500Hz drives 2 x 6" RST® Bass drivers, from 0Hz up to 500Hz, then cut everything up
MF/HF: 2.7kHz drives 1 x 4" RST Mid-range driver, from 500Hz to 2,7KHz then cut everything up

the 1 x 1" (25mm) C-CAM® gold dome tweeter start from 2.7KHz and go up to 35kHz
(maybe it has only a proper series capacitor as a simple and


as you can see in the cross-over specs
MA gives

more air/margin on the silver-6 for the LF, up to 700Hz, since it has only 1 x 6" RST® Bass driver
less air/margin on the silver-8 for the LF, only up to 500Hz, since it has 2 x 6" RST® Bass drivers

Beware, all this comes form my MA dealer that he got from MA tech_rep.

hth
 

TheDeuce

Active Member
So same crossover electronics, just set differently.

But of course, it still physically has 3 mechanical ways. In the end, the hardware exists in the 8 to create a more complete image.

I have to say though I'm somewhat reassured that the cut off is 500hz in the 8s. In the 6s the extra 200hz above that would effectively be lost from midrange and instead muddied by mixing with the lower frequencies in the bass driver. I imagine that the overall sensation of bass would therefore be about the same for both speakers, just that the 6s would be a little less distinct.

I'm thinking getting the 8s is pretty much a foregone conclusion now tbh. If I could easily get a demo if the 6s I would, but honestly hardly anyone has them now. Those that do have silver's all seem to have the 8s! I suppose that's a pretty clear sign that the 8s are an overall better product, they certainly review well and presumably sell easily... also at just 1m tall and 19cm across, they're physically able to fit in just about anywhere.

That said if anyone has demoed both, is love to hear their opinion!
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
2 1/2-Way vs 3 Way

my local MA dealer asked for me this specific question to local MA tech_rep
and the reply was :

both formats have 2 cross-overs

silver-6
2 1/2-Way cross-over format
==================
LF: 700Hz drives 1 x 6" RST® Bass driver only, from 0Hz up to 700Hz, ...

Uh... no... not quite. The speakers are configure as Low-Bass and Mid-Bass. In a 2.5-way design one speaker does not get a full-way designation because it shares a frequency range with another speaker. So, in the range of 0hz up to 700hz, BOTH bass drivers are working. Above 700hz only ONE bass driver is working. Then that one bass driver above 700hz hands off to the tweeter at 2.7khz.

Speaker that are a full-way, as in 3-way, each set of drivers get their own frequency range. In a half-way system, as in 2.5-way, speakers share a frequency range which is why the additional speaker in that range does not get a full-way designation.

3 Way cross-over format
================
LF/MF: 500Hz drives 2 x 6" RST® Bass drivers, from 0Hz up to 500Hz, ....

hth

As explained, in a full 3 way system, the TWO bass drivers are always in the circuit and both cover the range of 0 to 500hz. The Silver 8 also has a large cabinet, which helps contribute to better bass. Between 500hz and 2.7khz, the range is covered by the 4" midrange speaker, which then hands off to the tweeter at 2.7khz.

Here is a graphic that was created for another purpose but may serve here as an illustration.

Bass-1 combined with Bass-2 makes a 3.5-way system. Bass-1 and Bass-2 share a section of the low-bass range.

3_5-way_xo1-gif.161363


If this were a plain 3-way, Bass-1 and Bass-2 would still share the low-bass range but they would share the same low-bass range from 0hz to 800hz.

Steve/bluewizard
 

TheDeuce

Active Member
Thanks Steve,

But surely it's still 2 crossover points. Irrespective of the driver hardware or abilities, it's still true (based on what an MA rep apparently said), that both speakers have two crossover points. Is that what you're disagreeing with?

Of course, either way, it's still very important that the crossover delivers the signal to hardware which can accurately reproduce the sound. So whilst the 6 shares the same number of crossovers as the 8, it simply doesn't have the full range, distinct 3 driver types to take full advantage. For that reason I have never heard a 2 or 2.5 way speaker that absorbs me as much as a 3 way. I can always sense the gaps which I find a little distracting.
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Thanks Steve,

But surely it's still 2 crossover points. ... Is that what you're disagreeing with?

I'm not disagreeing with anything or anyone, I'm simply explaining the difference between 2.5-way and 3-way. In a 3-way each set of speakers has its own unique frequency range to cover. In a 2.5-way, some of the drivers share a frequency range. True the both have 2 crossover points, but they don't operate the same way.

Of course, either way, ... distinct 3 driver types to take full advantage. For that reason I have never heard a 2 or 2.5 way speaker that absorbs me as much as a 3 way. I can always sense the gaps which I find a little distracting.

It seems the decision is made they. You like 3-way, so do I. If that is what you like and that is what you want, then isn't the decision made?

Steve/bluewizard
 

TheDeuce

Active Member
Yes, as i said earlier.. I sense I have made decision haha. Just wanted to get some other opinions.

But as it happens, the course of this thread has simply reinforced and reminded me why the 8s are my obvious choice. It's a proper full range, not a compromise solution. I'd rather have a slightly lighter wallet than spend the next several years listening out for reminders of the compromise I made ;)

When I've settled on a deal for the 8's, I'll hopefully get round to putting up a review of sorts as to how they are to really live with, and how they go with the amp.
 

droidlike

Active Member
My MA dealer concluded that a 3-way speaker is always better in sq
because it has a DEDICATED mid freq driver ,
that is, in the silver-8 the 4" cone, dedicated for that exclusive task,
delivery only the freq from 500 to 2.7KHz.

In the silver-6 the mid driver is as big as the bass driver 6.5"
(so it is bigger then the 4" mid driver in the silver-8)
and that big mid driver in the silver-6
has the double task (double trouble ?) of
delivering the low freq together with the bass driver up to 700 Hz
and then continue to work up to 2.7KHz

The dedicated mid driver in the silver-8 is a smaller 4" only
and so the mid freq are clean from bass freq
and those mid freq in the silver-8, from 500 to 2.7KHz,
are delivered by a single and proper cone size
with dimensions physically related by the wave lenghts of the mid freq range, that is,
a driver with dimensions between 3" and 4" in size ,
in the silver-8 it is a 4" driver .

That is, a percepible and better Sound Quality in the mid freq .

That said my MA dealer

ps:
by the way I personally ended up looking at GOLD 200
which are 3-way with almost the same 4" driver size of the silver-8(but different material)
and a more better sound quality also at higher freq
with a special ribbon tweeter upped at 60Khz
and with a similar lower freq response of silver-8, 35Hz for gold200 vs 32Hz for silver-8.

In the words of MA, Golds share the same Platinum dna, at a fraction of Platinum price.
 
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TheDeuce

Active Member
You seen the price of even second hand golds?? :)

There is a weird thing about MA speakers... if you really follow the tech they develop you see that they're constantly bumping the top end stuff down to the lower end products each time the release a new generation of speaker. All manufacturers do this to a degree, but its literally a constant stream of hand me down tech with MA because they develop new flagship tech as fast as they release new generation speaker ranges.

I feel the current silver's hit a particularly sweet spot value wise though. I imagine it's because they're an effective re-launch of the silver range after the happy legacy left by the RS/RX speakers. I think they handed the mid range enthusiast a very good deal with the silver's.

The other issue is that people generally sell current gen speakers second hand for around half what they cost as new. And I literally just missed out on a pair of silver 8s for around 450. I coudnt hope to get an equivalent set of current gen golds for that kind of money as they cost so much more to begin with.

I should also add that I'm not entirely sure ribbon tweeters are quite worth the hype just yet. I totally understand the technology and the potential, but the engineers have had decades to perfect the dome tweeter and crucially decades worth of real world feedback on their efforts. Following a listen to some platinum Ma's, I didn't feel I was listening to a top end that wasn't achieved by other speakers without ribbon tweeters. I fully expect in 5-10 years time that will change, but for now it's just not a deal breaker for me.
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
My MA dealer concluded that a 3-way speaker is always better in sq
because it has a DEDICATED mid freq driver ,
that is, in the silver-8 the 4" cone, dedicated for that exclusive task,
delivery only the freq from 500 to 2.7KHz.

In the silver-6 the mid driver is as big as the bass driver 6.5"
...
and that big mid driver in the silver-6
has the double task (double trouble ?) ...

A 6" to 6.5" driver is struggling to reach up to 2.7khz. They manage to great effect, but a large diameter speaker can have midrange or bass, but it can't have both. So the compromise on both ends to make it work.

However, for a 4' midrange to cover 500hz to 2.7khz is a piece of cake, easy. Which is why I prefer 3-way speakers. Why make two drivers struggle when 3 driver can easily cruise through the same range.

In fact, if you are building your own speakers, it make picking 3-way drivers so much easier. You can pick a woofer that goes low with no concern for its midrange performance. For midrange there are several full range drivers than would not strain in the least to cover the typical midrange. It also makes choosing the Tweeters easier. In a 2-way, the bass driver have to go up higher than they should, and the tweeter have to go a bit lower than they actually should. In a 3-way, the Tweeter crossover is typically well above the low end of the working range of the tweeter in effect increasing its power handling ability.

So in large speakers, my preference has always been for 3-way or 3.5-way.

The Half-Way aspect can also solve a problem know as Baffle Step. As the frequency rise, regardless of frequency range, the beam of sound tends to get narrower. Low-Bass is omni-directional (360°). However, a fixed amount of sound is spread for 360°, when that same amount of sound narrows to less than 180° all that sound is now concentrated forward. At that frequency, related to the width of the front baffle, the sound output is bumped up about +3dB.

Generally to compensate for this +3db bump, attenuators are used to bring the level down above the Baffle Step.

However, in a 2.5-way or 3.5-way the extra bass driver running in parallel and crossing at the Baffle Step Frequency off sets this. The extra driver at and below the Baffle Step boost the output by +3db, making the speaker flat from the lowest frequencies up to the Mid and/or High crossover.

So the extra bass driver running in parallel with another bass driver in a Half-Way configurations balances the bass down to the lowest frequencies, assuming it is applied at the Baffle Step Frequency, which is not always done. But that is one reason for using a Half-Way system.

Steve/bluewizard
 

TheDeuce

Active Member
I suppose logic would dictate that as the 6 is 2.5 way due to the dual purpose 6", the 8 could have been 3.5 way, utilising the hybrid 6" instead of 2x plain 6" bass drivers..

In fact I'm sure at some point in the development process they must have considered that. Makes sense on paper! But then as with all these things the on paper theory doesn't always follow through. For all I know they tried several combinations and ran them past several test audiences and for whatever reason the 6 ended up as a 2.5 and the 8 ended up as a 3 way when it could easily have been a 3.5.

One thing I'm pretty certain about: they designed the 8 to be the speaker that made sense, then took something away to achieve a cheaper 6 in the range, and added something not needed to also create a more expensive 10. It's hard to argue that the 8 is the best value of the 3 silver floorstanders and is effectively what the range is all about.
 

droidlike

Active Member
You seen the price of even second hand golds?? :)
.
.
.
.
I should also add that I'm not entirely sure ribbon tweeters are quite worth the hype just yet. I totally understand the technology and the potential, but the engineers have had decades to perfect the dome tweeter and crucially decades worth of real world feedback on their efforts. Following a listen to some platinum Ma's, I didn't feel I was listening to a top end that wasn't achieved by other speakers without ribbon tweeters. I fully expect in 5-10 years time that will change, but for now it's just not a deal breaker for me.

There is no way to find out around a complete idiot that
down-sells his phenomenal Gold 200 for a fraction of the real price .

The alternative is to find an MA dealer
that gives away ex-demo Gold 200s with a real discount (30-40% ?)

mmm...

Before going the route of Gold 200s
I started long ago hearing/auditioning the difference between
metal/soft dome tweeters and ribbon tweeters of some brands(mundorf/elac/MA)
and I personally found out that the ribbon tweeters
are already there
and really well done
in these days.

(didn't they started some/more than 20 years ago developing the ribbon tweeter tech ?)

It is so life like the ribbon tweeter
and so much more detailed in the nuances in the upper end freq
without being so Ssss-ibilant or bright/harsh at all
and they can give even a more tri-dimensional sound-stage, fwiw.

At least
I personally can appreciate right now
how good/better are the ribbon vs metal/soft dome tweeters.
 
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BlueBlitz

Active Member
Very informative thread @BlueWizard @droidlike thanks.

Sorry to hijack @TheDeuce, What's your room size if I may ? I have been following MA for sometime now and had the same question. One thing stopping me from Silver 8 was 4ohm Impedance plus the new series is already out. Planning to demo Silver 200/300 series in a week or two.

Within the same crossover context, from the spec
Silver 8
LF/MF: 500Hz
MF/HF: 2.7kHz

Silver 300
LF/MF: 570 Hz
MF/HF: 3.5 kHz

How do you read this numbers to be better or worse in comparison ?
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
...

Within the same crossover context, from the spec
Silver 8
LF/MF: 500Hz
MF/HF: 2.7kHz

Silver 300
LF/MF: 570 Hz
MF/HF: 3.5 kHz

How do you read this numbers to be better or worse in comparison ?

The speakers are designed to cover the range in which the drivers will work. It is nice to know the numbers, but you have to trust that the designers did what was best for that particular group of drivers.

The two speakers are ...essentially... the same.

Note that the new Silver 300 is rated at 8 ohms.

I can only speculate that the older Silver 8 were 4 ohm because they wanted to reduce the number of drivers in a given range to keep the cost down. To have two bass drivers running in parallel and producing 8 ohms, they have to be 16 ohm bass drivers. However, with a one design of 8 ohm bass driver you can have 8 ohm and 4 ohm speakers. I suspect that's what they did but the found the market more reluctant to embrace a 4 ohms speaker, so in the new series, they bit the bullet and went back to 8 ohm drivers and 16 ohm drivers.

Steve/bluewizard
 
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BlueBlitz

Active Member
Thanks @BlueWizard

Say if a new speaker came out with LF/MF : 600 Hz and MF/HF : 4.5 Hz.

Usually we say, its better to have high sensitivity for speakers, similarly do we really look at this range ? Can we say 500(silver 8) is better than 600 for LF/MF or viceversa ?
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
@BlueBlitz - I'm not sure what you are asking. The crossovers are dictated by the Drivers, by finding a frequency where both drivers will blend together smoothly.

If you look at the frequency response of this 6.5" (165mm) woofer, you will see that it is only really good up to about 1khz, though it could be stretch up to nearly 3khz.

https://www.parts-express.com/pedocs/specs/295-305-dayton-audio-dc160-8-specifications-46146.pdf

Now here is the 8" Version of the same speaker, notice it is not functional to as high a frequency -

https://www.parts-express.com/pedocs/specs/DC200-8 8_ Classic Woofer 8 Ohm Specification Sheet.pdf

The 10" Version has even poorer midrange response -

https://www.parts-express.com/pedocs/specs/295-315-dayton-audio-dc250-8-specifications-46150.pdf

This tweeter claims response down to 1300hz, however, you would never crossover that low because you would lose power handling ability; the excursion would be too high at higher power for the Tweeter to handle.

Also notice that the Minimum Impedance is lower than the Rated Impedance. The tweeter can drop down to as low as 5.4 ohms, but that is Free Air Impedance. With Cabinet Loading, at certain frequencies that can driver the functional impedance lower.

Many of the 8 ohm rated Bowers-Wilkins speakers can drop down near 3 ohms at one specific frequency. So, this is not uncommon. This is also true of 4 ohm drivers, they can easily drop to about 3 ohms or a bit less at the rated minimum impedance, and perhaps lower with Cabinet Loading.

On the same spec sheets I linked to, you can also see the Impedance response of a typical speaker.

The tend to look something like this - (Blue Line) -

http://diyaudioprojects.com/Drivers/W3-1878/TangBand-W3-1878-Driver-Frequency-Response.jpg

However, when placed in a cabinet, it can then look like this - (Blue Line)

http://diyaudioprojects.com/Speaker...Kit/Tang-Band-D4-1-SPL-Impedance-response.jpg

Notice that typically just above the high peak in impedance at about 70hz, the impedance drops to its lowest point. In this example at about 350hz.

So, speaker design is very complex and very dependent on the specific drivers used. The location of the crossovers does not reflect the quality of the design, merely the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the specific drivers used.

Steve/bluewizard
 

BlueBlitz

Active Member
@BlueWizard Thank you so much for that, those links were really helpful.

So ideally a 3 way speaker is best, so mid range will have its own driver.

Once you leave the LF to be dealt with a sub, say less than 500 Hz and since midrange will deal with 500 to 2.7 hz what exactly are the two bass drivers in a large floorstander doing ?

May I ask, what speakers you have ?
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
... So ideally a 3 way speaker is best, so mid range will have its own driver.

Perhaps, but not necessarily, 3-way is easiest because each driver covers a narrower range of frequencies.

Once you leave the LF to be dealt with a sub, say less than 500 Hz and since midrange will deal with 500 to 2.7 hz what exactly are the two bass drivers in a large floorstander doing ?

May I ask, what speakers you have ?

The Sub would never be as high a 500hz. Likely it will be in the 50hz to 200hz range, with 80hz to 120hz being very common. So, between the Sub/Front Crossover, and the Woofer/Mid crossover, the Front Bass driver are adding pretty significantly.

Using a far more common Crossover of 80hz, that means the Woofers in the Front speaker are covering 80hz to 500hz. There is also something called the Bass Presence Range, that is the area where you perceive bass most, and that happens to be in roughly the 80hz to 120hz range.

Also remember that the Crossovers are not brick walls or sheer cliffs. At those frequencies, the sound for each driver is fading in or out. It is rolling off at a gradual slope.

Steve/bluewizard
 

BlueBlitz

Active Member
@BlueWizard Ty again, I have a soundbar, so never had to worry about cross overs but yea, I get the picture now.

So other than the juice, is there any benefit having two sub drivers on the floorstander? I mean people say having two subs is better for dynamic range/lower distortion etc, any such technicalities there ?

For a medium room, is there much difference having a floor stander with one bass drive and a sub as opposed to having a floor stander with two bass drivers for a given( medium)volume ? They say bigger floor standers wont bring the best out unless played at an increased volume.

My room is 1500 sqft, still debating Silver 200 or 300, hence :)
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
This is close to my system now. I've replaced the Yamaha RX-797 Stereo Receiver with a Rotel RA-1570.

Speakers -

Wharfedale Diamond 9.6
DIY 12" 3-Way

Turntable -


Pioneer PL35A turntable

i49-sysall2s-jpg.302986
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
...
So other than the juice, is there any benefit having two sub drivers on the floorstander? I mean people say having two subs is better for dynamic range/lower distortion etc, any such technicalities there?

I think you mean two Woofers, not two Sub-drivers. Multiple smaller woofer will be narrower than one large bass driver, and people seem to like that today. You really don't see that many speakers today that have 10", 12", or 15" woofers.

There is perhaps an advantage to having two Subwoofer, though room dependent, in that you get more uniform coverage in the room.

For a medium room, is there much difference having a floor stander with one bass drive and a sub as opposed to having a floor stander with two bass drivers for a given( medium)volume ? They say bigger floor standers wont bring the best out unless played at an increased volume.

My room is 1500 sqft, still debating Silver 200 or 300, hence :)

1500 SqFt, that's 39ft x 39ft, that's a pretty large room by most standards. Are you sure you got those numbers right?

Typically listening space is smaller than the overall room size, in my case, my listening space is 16ft x 16ft, but the overall open-floorplan room is 16ft x 36ft. That additional space, especially in the direction the speakers are firing is a definite advantage, especially with larger speakers.

But in a room 39ft x 39ft (12m x 12m), you can use just about any speakers you want. For movies I use both the 12" 3-Way and the Diamond 9.6 (2x8" ea). For music, just the Diamond 9.6. Today, 2x8" is about the largest you will find.

Depending on your listening distance, pretty much any speaker you like that you can afford should work well. Though as a general principle, the larger the speaker, the more space it will need around it. Generally for a larger floorstanding, you need 12" to 18" behind the speaker. In my case, I move the speaker forward even with the front of the TV/Equipment stand and that gives me roughly 12" to 14" behind the speakers.

In a room 39ft x 39ft that should not be a problem.

Steve/bluewizard
 

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