Military/Travel

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Yohinan, Feb 26, 2014.

  1. Yohinan

    Yohinan
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    I wasn't sure if this should go in the General Chat or Travel section, if I have made a mistake please mods correct me and move to the appropriate location. One benefit when retiring from the military (United States) is having the ability to travel the world via Military transport through a program called Space-A or Space Available (SA). You pay roughly 25 dollars (15.02 British Pound Sterling) for each flight. In my mind a fantastic benefit, yet you could be in remote location for a week or longer at times if space is UNAVAILABLE. Basically unless there's SA then your waiting as each flight arrives and departs. Being retired that's not a huge concern yet at times it can be if some type of emergency arose.

    I have spent some time abroad alongside British service members and during all those times working together the thought never occurred to make inquiry so I decided better late then never.

    Is there any type of similar benefit to those individuals whom decide to make the service a career and retire?

    What type of other, if any, benefits/privileges are granted/awarded if you retire from the service?

    What's the minimum number of years to reach retirement? Here it's 20 years minimum normally, unless extenuating circumstances exist and if that's the case you can have as few as 2 or 3 years and be permanently retired.

    Is there a maximum time you can spend during your contract's which eventually expire and your forced to retire? For us if you reach 30 years that basically it and you must retire.

    Any other pertinent details you wouldn't mind sharing would be most welcomed. If you have any questions your interested in sending my way feel free and I will answer to the best of my ability.

    TIA! J
     
  2. Doug the D

    Doug the D
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    After 11 years in the British Army, the only thing I've got from them is some good stories!

    In all seriousness, there isn't anything which is comparable to SA , as far as I know (I left 7 years ago). But there are some very good perks for the service leaver, which although are useful, aren't really advertised as such to people leaving the forces. An example of this is that I've just found out that I can claim £1000 per year to educate myself. Lucky for me that I've just found out, as I can use this claim on 3 occasions (£1000 per time), but only up until 10 years after leaving (I'll just manage to get the 3 claims in, phew!)
    If I'd left after 13 years service instead of 11 like I did, I'd be entitled to £2000 per year for 3 claims. The military does spend alot of money on resettlement - I got over £5000 spent on me to re-train for civilian life. Thank you, your majesty!

    With regards to retirement, the normal full career length is 22 years for a full pension, although you can leave after 12 and get a half-pension. I'm not sure of the upper age at which the Army force you to leave, but I know that extensions to service must be put in if you want to serve past the 22 years served/ 40 years of age limit. This extension is by no means a sure bet, lots of guys get turned down. A typical extension is 2 or 3 years.

    I'm not sure if the Royal Air Force or Royal Navy have different terms of service.

    I hope that answers some of your queries!
     
  3. Desmo

    Desmo
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    Whatever you guys get...it's not enough. Thank you for your service....the pair of you.
     
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  4. phil t

    phil t
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    With the Royal Navy, it very much depends on the requirement of the service.

    As a general rule, you have to leave on or before your 55th birthday. As already said, only if they want/need you. There can always be exceptions to that rule.

    I left 5 years ago aged 41, having completed 22 years and was offered 5, 10 or 14 years extension.

    Sometimes I wonder why I turned it down!!!

    :)
     
  5. SteveCritten

    SteveCritten
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    Ditto Desmo, as usual the ones that give the most get the least.
     
  6. Yohinan

    Yohinan
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    We have something similar to what you (Doug the D) describe when it come's to educational benefits, although all service members are eligible, this is NOT a retirement benefit. There are a few different programs depending on the era you joined the service and you must have chosen to have a small portion of pay deducted for a certain period of time.

    The current benefit is called the post 911 GI Bill and it is absolutely fantastic! For all the terrible things some go through while serving this is one of those great perks for those whom choose to participate. Under the current GI Bill you have 15 years to use your benefits after discharge before you permanently lose them.

    As stated previously the GI Bill is not a retirement benefit though, anyone that completes at least 90 days of active service and chooses to have the appropriate financial requirements deducted from their pay gains this benefit. There are a few other requirements; one of them being you must serve your term and be honorably discharged.

    If one chose to participate and meets all requirements yet is dishonorably discharged this benefit is lost. Furthermore, if you're "awarded" a Big Chicken Dinner (BCD aka Bad Conduct Discharge) you lose not only this benefit but any and all benefits so you must maintain a certain minimum conduct during your time served.

    The GI Bill prior to the post 911 GI bill (Montgomery GI Bill) was rather decent in itself, however the new version is drastically improved including allotments for living expenses (housing), books and supplies stipend, tuition and fees which are paid directly to the school, tutoring stipend, one time payment limited in amount for moving expenses. Also you're not limited to only traditional educational avenues, however they must be previously "approved." These would be vocational schools, flight training, apprenticeships, and a few others. If you decided to participate and then choose not to use this benefit there are ways of not losing it, you can actually transfer the benefit to a family member, child or spouse.

    Between the 5 different branches of military service for the most part retirement benefits apply across the board and they are all basically one in the same. Am I forming the wrong impression in what I am reading in that depending on the branch served in your neck of the woods you have different benefits? Maybe I am just reading too much into things and this is in fact not the case.

    Very interesting reading about how things work for you all.
     
  7. nheather

    nheather
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    I'm a civilian working in the defence sector , currently on an aircraft project that takes me to the US regularly. Just in the times I have visited it is clear that the US respects and values its veterans much more than the UK. I have seen plenty of events where veterans are given free entrance or products by organisations and they are happy to include some of my colleagues who are ex-RAF. You don't see anything like that happening in the UK.

    I'm afraid that as a country in general we are not very good at being proud of our nation and the people her serve for it.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  8. Doug the D

    Doug the D
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    No, you read it correctly :)

    I'm not sure about how things are now, but generally speaking there were different terms of service applied between the 3 Armed Forces in the UK.

    Don't even get me started on how cushy the RAF used to have it on exercises/ operations! - I've known guys that were living in shell-scrapes in woodland in Scotland during the winter whilst the RAF that they were working alongside during the day were sleeping in a 5* hotel on St. Andrews golf course...This was many years ago though. Perhaps the RAF have got tougher, and send their guys into the field properly. Or not [​IMG]
     
  9. nheather

    nheather
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    I know what you are saying, there are lots of jokes made about it, and not limited to the UK by any means.

    But in all fairness, when times get nasty, aircrew face the biggest probability of being killed or captured - must be pretty scary.

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  10. Wardy257

    Wardy257
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    The rules are the same for all 3 services so no excuses if your sleeping arrangements were poor. I have planned and executed UK and overseas exercises with staff from the 3 services taking part and the rules don't change. All to often the army senior officers insist their guys get it rough so blame them.
     
  11. Courtjezter

    Courtjezter
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    There is a similar travel system for the military, but it only applies for serving military and dependents on military flights.

    The name of the system has gone out of my head at present* but it works similarly to the US system in that you take up space, on a flight, on a fill-up basis and you just pay a nominal cost. For example i think you could pay £15 for a seat on a flight to Cyprus. The price depends on destination, though. The only issue with the system being was you weren't ever guaranteed a seat and you were the lowest priority passenger, so if a full fare paying passenger came forward they could take the seat, but you would be refunded your fare.

    I have always felt that the US takes better care of the veterans than the UK does, though.

    *Edit*

    It is called Indulgence travel, that has been bugging me for half an hour now.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  12. Courtjezter

    Courtjezter
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    Never assume that all RAF are aircrew, but you can generally tell the aircrew from the rest. They are the ones with nice samsonite suitcases with labels from a lot of nice touristy destinations on them and generally ask if they can go into the VIP lounge, the non aircrew generally carry around 'proper' luggage and don't mind who they sit next to or with.
     
  13. Courtjezter

    Courtjezter
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    It is the same for the RAF.

    If i had stayed in i would be 5 years off my 22 and i could of retired at 41, oh well back to the grindstone.
     
  14. Yohinan

    Yohinan
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    It does seem that there's a big difference in benefits between the US and the UK services.
     
  15. Sonic67

    Sonic67
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    Just like penguins, one in a million actually flies.
     
  16. Courtjezter

    Courtjezter
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    But at least the RAF just send their officers to war.
     
  17. Wardy257

    Wardy257
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    At least the turn up first and don't have to set sail for 3 weeks.
     
  18. reevesy

    reevesy
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    that made me chuckle
    ....don't remember it being like that on op granby ;).....or in belize.....or in NI for that matter...though I do remember in NI being amazed that they had chocolate milk on tap !
    ......and as for Germany...the only uk bases I ever went on that had more than a naffi was 'crab air' ones
    ...not bitter :D

    mind you I'd swap sand in me never regions for a G and T by the pool :D


    ....oh and they do " turn up first"......as long as there is an airport....or if some nice Royal Engineers build them a strip to land on ;)

    back on topic ....this country has always been lousy with regards to their ex servicemen compared to many others....not so much as a railcard let alone a flight.

    I do remember on my final medical been told as I joined before 1989 I was entitled to apply for compensation if I was to have hearing problems

    .....I did reply "pardon"
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2014
  19. Sonic67

    Sonic67
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    Anyone notice this recently?

    BBC News - RAF planes 'grounded' after 'in-flight issue'

    The RAF has "grounded" its fleet of military Voyager transport planes following, what the Ministry of Defence calls an "in-flight issue" .

    The BBC has been told a Voyager carrying British troops back to Afghanistan dropped a few thousand feet while in Turkish airspace.

    As a precaution the pilot diverted the plane to Incirlik - a US military base in southern Turkey.

    About 200 military personnel were on board.


    The solution has been found:

    Report: Sudden Plunge of New UK A330 Caused by Wedged Camera | Defense News | defensenews.com

    [​IMG]
     
  20. John

    John
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    I read a notice from the CAA the other day regarding PEDs. This is obviosly where it originated from then
     
  21. indianwells

    indianwells
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    When I was in the RAF this was the reason it was known as the "sensible" Service. Only the Ruperts put their neck on the line.:thumbsup:
     
  22. Sonic67

    Sonic67
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    In the US Reservists get preferential access to job vacancies, universal tuition fees can be made for and there are tax breaks for firms. All not currently done in the UK.
     

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