Mic for DSLR

Overbeyond

Novice Member
I use a Fuji XE1 camera and I would like to fit a Mic to hot shoe. I just want to pick up ambient noises; birds, light wind etc. The built in mic makes wind sound like noise. Any suggestions please. A budget model will suit as anything over 100Euro is beyond what I can afford. Is such a Mic available at that cost?
Any help at all will be fully appreciated.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Have a look at the BOYA VM190P mic. Good performance.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
And consider a dead cat or rycote additional wind filter for it!! Makes a huge difference when working outdoors.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
And consider a dead cat or rycote additional wind filter for it!! Makes a huge difference when working outdoors.
The Boya actually comes supplied with foam filter and a fur filter. Both can be used together over the mic to reduce wind noise. All you will need is a battery.
I don't know if your DSLR comes with a headphone socket but, if it does, headphones are an excellent way to monitor what the camera is "hearing".
 

Overbeyond

Novice Member
Thank you so much Terfyn and Noiseboy for your assistance. Very helpful.
I have a nice shortlist now and hopefully will buy soon.
 

12harry

Well-known Member
Hi, I suspect your requirements ( birdsong, etc.) may mean getting something a tad better than an on-camera mic. You will find that birdsong is significantly quieter than it appears ( when we listen for it ), due to the processing our brains perform . . . when we concentrate on the birdsong we ignore the other sounds about. In addition to needing to prevent wind-noise getting to the mic ( Foam+Fur is a good start, but a proper Blimp is likely to be better - although bulky.).
Don't spend too much initially, as you may need to buy a hand-held recorder ( several by Zoom, typically start at £80.) and this will increase the makes/style/prices... with a shotgun-style mic. at the top.. these will need a Blimp to remove any wind-noise - but the blimp may cost more than the recorder, as blimps don't have large sales, to encourage competition.
Of course, you can DIY once you understand how the mic fits inside and can support the blimp without both handling+cable noises .
BTW, wind-noise is "almost" impossible to record.... for a scene on the bleak moors I ended up starting with a howling chimney, multi-tracked and run at different speeds ( to change the frequencies ) and then each track was randomly changed for volume along its duration. When combined it represented a howling heath, with the intensity varying in a semi rhythmic pattern.
It's on the screen for a few seconds, but SFX can take a lot of time to get "right" =What the audience expects. Ideally, they shouldn't notice!
For less critical uses, there are many On-Line providers of SFX but trawling-through can be a pain, esp. if you "know what you want". Some are Royalty-free !

Cheers
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Have you tried the BOYA VM190P Harry? It does what it says on the box.

If you are serious about sound, I would suggest the TASCAM DR-60D MkII recorder. It is an excellent recorder which records to SD card but with an output to sync an audio signal to the camera. I run mine with a pair of matched Berhinger condenser mics (Phantom power supplied)
I then use the higher quality recorded output in my video editor to align with the track recorded on the video.
 

Overbeyond

Novice Member
Hi, I suspect your requirements ( birdsong, etc.) may mean getting something a tad better than an on-camera mic. You will find that birdsong is significantly quieter than it appears ( when we listen for it ), due to the processing our brains perform . . . when we concentrate on the birdsong we ignore the other sounds about. In addition to needing to prevent wind-noise getting to the mic ( Foam+Fur is a good start, but a proper Blimp is likely to be better - although bulky.).
Don't spend too much initially, as you may need to buy a hand-held recorder ( several by Zoom, typically start at £80.) and this will increase the makes/style/prices... with a shotgun-style mic. at the top.. these will need a Blimp to remove any wind-noise - but the blimp may cost more than the recorder, as blimps don't have large sales, to encourage competition.
Of course, you can DIY once you understand how the mic fits inside and can support the blimp without both handling+cable noises .
BTW, wind-noise is "almost" impossible to record.... for a scene on the bleak moors I ended up starting with a howling chimney, multi-tracked and run at different speeds ( to change the frequencies ) and then each track was randomly changed for volume along its duration. When combined it represented a howling heath, with the intensity varying in a semi rhythmic pattern.
It's on the screen for a few seconds, but SFX can take a lot of time to get "right" =What the audience expects. Ideally, they shouldn't notice!
For less critical uses, there are many On-Line providers of SFX but trawling-through can be a pain, esp. if you "know what you want". Some are Royalty-free !

Cheers
Many thanks. A lot for me to take in but I will study your response.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
I suspect you may need to define what it is that you want to record and, as Harry says, you might need to carry out independent recordings.

For example a mic on the camera will give you a synchronised audio with the video recording but you may not need this. Example: Birds and birdsong need not be recorded at the same time, the birdsong could be included as an accompaniment to a video of birds. (same breed - of course.:facepalm:)

An on board mic is needed for synchronised video and audio. (Although, as I explained above, there are recorders that will do both at the same time)
But often it is better to record the audio separately, again an example might be a play on a stage, The camera would normally be at the back of the auditorium but the sound should be recorded close up to the stage.
 

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