Mere mortal looking for advice

Kammando90

Novice Member
Hello,
I am looking advice to buy a new tv and looking for the best picture. After researching a little bit I am about to bite the bullet based on HDTVtest advice that Panasonic OLED is the best out there. I also found it got the Best in Class award by avforums, but was further confused by the Highly recommended award for the Philips which seems to have more 9's and 10s than the Panasonic.

After researching QLED and OLED, I am afraid to pick on the OLED because I really hate movies where its dark and you can't see anything and they say OLED does not represents shadows well- is this exaggerated by reviewers? On the other hand I am afraid to pick on the QLED and get grey blacks like a bootlegged VHS. Meanwhile Linus says the new Samsung QLED Mini LED has near exactly same black levels on the LG OLED, as in he can't tell the difference.

If you think its worth the wait as new better miniLED tvs are coming along or even microLED I can do that. If you think I won't see a worthy difference between my 2013 Samsung and a modern tv please tell me so I can save my money. Last thing I want to do is get a new tv and tell myself "I notice nothing different".

One thing to note here is that the premium tv's are all outrageous sizes at 50+ inches. I come from the CRT days and my current 46 looks large and I am looking for maybe a smaller size. So are 42inch premium quality is even a thing?

Another question: I hear Sony has the best video processing. What does this mean? is it true?

thank you for your time and help.
 

vickster

Distinguished Member
Note QLED is just another name for LCD.

TVs under 48 (OLED) or 49 (LCD) can’t handle HDR as they don’t get bright enough so HDR content will look dark.

Does your 46” have a wide bezel? If so, the Sony 49xh9505 May not look as big as you expect (cracking TV too that can handle HDR)

There are rumours of a 42” OLED but nothing confirmed
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
MicroLED is a game changing tech if it succeeds. Right now the trouble with it is getting the LEDs small enough to use on consumer sized TVs. TVs that do have that tech, and prototypes are larger 100inch screens.

MiniLED is a means to light an LCD TV, the only difference between LED and MiniLED is the LEDs themselves are smaller. On very high end TVs with hundreds or thousands of dimming zones this can make a difference. On most high end TVs though, including the QN90A it actually isn't a big deal.

The limiting factor with LCD TVs isn't how small its LEDs are, but how many zones the TV has behind the panel, and how well the dimming algorithm can decide when one zone is opened and another closed.

QLED is more marketting blurp, a bit like MiniLED, in essence it means very little. The Q stands for quantum, which otherwise is known as quantum dot. This just means TVs marketed as QLED use a quantum dot filter to reproduce colour on the TV. Other companies have similar tech that does the same thing, but with different names....Sony- Triluminous, LG- Nanocell. Best thing is to just ignore it.

Deciding between an LCD TV and OLED really should depend on your own personal preferences and your viewing conditions. They are different beasts, suited to different people, different rooms. One mans perfect TV will be an LCD TV, anothers an OLED.

I tried to compare them here if it helps:

Regarding which OLED (if you decide on one) they are all remarkably similar in picture quality because they all share the same panel made by LG. This is why when you read reviews there's very little difference in score between all. Differences are in smaller areas outside the panel such as picture processing, smart TV, features and connectivity.

To use an example from my comparison and the TVs you've mentioned. Philips OLEDs are a good choice for someone who likes the sound of Ambilight, wants Android TV built in and also values motion to be good on a TV. Perhaps because they watch sport.

On other other hand Panasonic TVs are really popular by AV enthusiasts who value picture accuracy and intend to use the TV for films. There smart TV is more basic, but when someone cares most about how close the TV is to the directors intent, that doesn't matter.

Its worth also considering value for money at the moment. Unless you are buying a 2020 model right now, you'll be stuck with only overpriced 2021-2022 models. I'd advise if you do set your eyes on a 2021 model, wait to buy at a time when they aren't so expensive. Black Friday each year is a good time to start shopping.

Regarding size, 55" is considered small by manufacturers nowadays and is the baseline size for higher range TVs. Because of this you'll end up paying the same, if not more for a 48" model compared to 55".
 

Kammando90

Novice Member
MicroLED is a game changing tech if it succeeds. Right now the trouble with it is getting the LEDs small enough to use on consumer sized TVs. TVs that do have that tech, and prototypes are larger 100inch screens.

MiniLED is a means to light an LCD TV, the only difference between LED and MiniLED is the LEDs themselves are smaller. On very high end TVs with hundreds or thousands of dimming zones this can make a difference. On most high end TVs though, including the QN90A it actually isn't a big deal.

The limiting factor with LCD TVs isn't how small its LEDs are, but how many zones the TV has behind the panel, and how well the dimming algorithm can decide when one zone is opened and another closed.

QLED is more marketting blurp, a bit like MiniLED, in essence it means very little. The Q stands for quantum, which otherwise is known as quantum dot. This just means TVs marketed as QLED use a quantum dot filter to reproduce colour on the TV. Other companies have similar tech that does the same thing, but with different names....Sony- Triluminous, LG- Nanocell. Best thing is to just ignore it.

Deciding between an LCD TV and OLED really should depend on your own personal preferences and your viewing conditions. They are different beasts, suited to different people, different rooms. One mans perfect TV will be an LCD TV, anothers an OLED.

I tried to compare them here if it helps:

Regarding which OLED (if you decide on one) they are all remarkably similar in picture quality because they all share the same panel made by LG. This is why when you read reviews there's very little difference in score between all. Differences are in smaller areas outside the panel such as picture processing, smart TV, features and connectivity.

To use an example from my comparison and the TVs you've mentioned. Philips OLEDs are a good choice for someone who likes the sound of Ambilight, wants Android TV built in and also values motion to be good on a TV. Perhaps because they watch sport.

On other other hand Panasonic TVs are really popular by AV enthusiasts who value picture accuracy and intend to use the TV for films. There smart TV is more basic, but when someone cares most about how close the TV is to the directors intent, that doesn't matter.

Its worth also considering value for money at the moment. Unless you are buying a 2020 model right now, you'll be stuck with only overpriced 2021-2022 models. I'd advise if you do set your eyes on a 2021 model, wait to buy at a time when they aren't so expensive. Black Friday each year is a good time to start shopping.

Regarding size, 55" is considered small by manufacturers nowadays and is the baseline size for higher range TVs. Because of this you'll end up paying the same, if not more for a 48" model compared to 55".

thanks your advice is most appreciate. Is there any difference between 2020 and 2021 models? I doubt tech change muched? Do you think its worth it to upgrade from my 2013 or will I not notice a difference as tech as not really advanced much?

ps. 55 is humongous , these are intended for living rooms areas or a theater like situation meanwhile I watch tv in the bedroom.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
We'll have to disagree on the size bit. I have a 65" TV in my living room and a 55" in the bedroom and wish both were bigger. My in-laws have a 85" TV in their living room and bedroom. I think its a personal preference, I don't really understand the whole 'dominating the room' thing people sometimes say about TVs...but I'm sure room size plays a part too. The sad thing is, to benefit from 4k, you need to view almost with your eyes stuck up to the screen on a smaller TV...kinda makes the entire thing pointless (apart from HDR, which is not resolution dependent).

Between 2021 and 2020 models the only TVs that have a picture quality difference are the 55" and up LG G1, Sony A80J, A90J, Panasonic JZ1500 & JZ2000. These models come with a new panel type that can get brighter for better HDR picture quality, and more durable. The very high end models also have a cooling backplate which makes the TVs even brighter again.

For SDR though, when brightness isn't a concern, there's not a big difference. With a newer TV you do tend to get more up to date smart TV so you see updates a year longer and in the case of Panasonic, Sony and Philips you get updated connectivity with HDMI 2.1 too. (LG already had HDMI 2.1 back in 2020).

As for noticing a difference the general rule to upgrade a TV is if you intend to use it to view the latest and greatest quality content. If you want to use the TV with UHD and HDR you will get the largest gain from a new TV. If you are expecting it to be better handling lower quality content you may be disappointed, so only upgrade with a view to the use the TV mainly with high quality sources.
 

Kammando90

Novice Member
We'll have to disagree on the size bit. I have a 65" TV in my living room and a 55" in the bedroom and wish both were bigger. My in-laws have a 85" TV in their living room and bedroom. I think its a personal preference, I don't really understand the whole 'dominating the room' thing people sometimes say about TVs...but I'm sure room size plays a part too. The sad thing is, to benefit from 4k, you need to view almost with your eyes stuck up to the screen on a smaller TV...kinda makes the entire thing pointless (apart from HDR, which is not resolution dependent).

Between 2021 and 2020 models the only TVs that have a picture quality difference are the 55" and up LG G1, Sony A80J, A90J, Panasonic JZ1500 & JZ2000. These models come with a new panel type that can get brighter for better HDR picture quality, and more durable. The very high end models also have a cooling backplate which makes the TVs even brighter again.

For SDR though, when brightness isn't a concern, there's not a big difference. With a newer TV you do tend to get more up to date smart TV so you see updates a year longer and in the case of Panasonic, Sony and Philips you get updated connectivity with HDMI 2.1 too. (LG already had HDMI 2.1 back in 2020).

As for noticing a difference the general rule to upgrade a TV is if you intend to use it to view the latest and greatest quality content. If you want to use the TV with UHD and HDR you will get the largest gain from a new TV. If you are expecting it to be better handling lower quality content you may be disappointed, so only upgrade with a view to the use the TV mainly with high quality sources.

thanks for the help, I appreciate it. My 2 cents on on tv size is I feel big screen tvs feel like going to the theater with front row tickets, the screen is just too big to view the whole picture.
 

Repoman666

Active Member
Just my two-penneth on size if I may :) It depends how far you sit from the screen.
It would be silly (and a waste of money) to pay for a 48" OLED Ultra HD TV and then
be sitting 3 - 4 metres away. You would not see any benefit of all those extra pixels all
the fine detail would be lost.
I have the HZ2000 65inch and sit 3 metres away (I feel 70" would be better).
For Ultra HD viewing I found this formula seems to work =
Work out in inches how far your eyes are giong to be from the screen then muliply
this figure by 0.535 and that will give you your screen size for UHD viewing.
in my case it is 120 x 0.535 = 64.2 inches :)
 

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