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Maximum length of cable to set top box

Pingcrosby

Standard Member
Hi

I am planning on moving my virgin set top box to another room in the house. The new position will mean i will need a cable from the cable entry point (white box) approximately 10 metres in length.

The current cable is approximately 3.5 metres in length so I plan on replacing the current cable with a 10 metre length of CT100 cable and F type connectors.

Will this distance be too great?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
You should be fine and even if you do find that you're losing the signal, VM can always come out and increase it.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
And charge you £35 for tampering with the cables

and how will they know unless you tell them? Simply report a fault and someone will come out to you. They'll test the signal strength at the STB and then adjust it if needed via the main box outside on the street. They don't come to your house and instigate a site survey or bring thumb screws with them (not unless you specifically ask for thumb screws in writing and in advance).

Many people install their own coax around their homes and I don't see a glut of reports saying installers refuse to use such cabling or that the customers are being charged for using their own cabling? You are actually awarded the right to some degree to install your own cables by law. It is the same law that prevented BT charging extortionate amounts for telephone point extensions which require more knowledge and skill to install than a length of coax. If VM insist on charging people £100 to simply provide a longer length of coax terminated with F connectors then I'd like to see them substantiate this in a court when the BT ruling is cited???? The BT ruling sets precedence. VM can offer the service at that price or quote whatever they want, but VM have no right to stop someone from doing it for themselves for much less!

Apart from this, if the signal is too weak to cope with a 10m length of coax then the signal was too weak to begin with and it is VM's responsibility to rectify it without incurring additional charges to the customer!
 
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jb66

Active Member
and how will they know unless you tell them? Simply report a fault and someone will come out to you. They'll test the signal strength at the STB and then adjust it if needed via the main box outside on the street. They don't come to your house and instigate a site survey or bring thumb screws with them (not unless you specifically ask for thumb screws in writing and in advance).

Many people install their own coax around their homes and I don't see a glut of reports saying installers refuse to use such cabling or that the customers are being charged for using their own cabling? You are actually awarded the right to some degree to install your own cables by law. It is the same law that prevented BT charging extortionate amounts for telephone point extensions which require more knowledge and skill to install than a length of coax. If VM insist on charging people £100 to simply provide a longer length of coax terminated with F connectors then I'd like to see them substantiate this in a court when the BT ruling is cited???? The BT ruling sets precedence. VM can offer the service at that price or quote whatever they want, but VM have no right to stop someone from doing it for themselves for much less!

Apart from this, if the signal is too weak to cope with a 10m length of coax then the signal was too weak to begin with and it is VM's responsibility to rectify it without incurring additional charges to the customer!

They will know if you use non virgin approved cable, I've charged many customers due to this as the satelite cable they use is rubbish for the return path. My point is, if you decide to tamper with the cables then be prepared to fix the fault yourself or face a £35 charge.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
They will know if you use non virgin approved cable, I've charged many customers due to this as the satelite cable they use is rubbish for the return path. My point is, if you decide to tamper with the cables then be prepared to fix the fault yourself or face a £35 charge.

Why did you feel any need to charge them anything and why not just simply fit the cable required? The money doesn't go into your pocket. The customer already pays for a service and your time at their home is already accounted for within their service charge, whether you attend or not!


Virgin approved cable? You mean bog standard WF100 coax? Do you pay the customer if they are using better coax???? :D


Are you the installer they refer to as 'Jobsworth'? How much do you charge for reseating an HDMI lead :D

Can I charge VM if the person they send out cannot find a fault and I end up having to point out to them where to look? So VM deduct £35 from you each time you fail to satisfy the customer and rectify faults?
 
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jb66

Active Member
I feel the need to charge them as if they cant do it properly then they shouldnt be doing it at all, I use good quality shielded RG6 with decent f connectors, not the crappy screw on ones you would use.

Do you have any other myths or wrong information you want me to correct?
 

Boostrail

Distinguished Member
I feel the need to charge them as if they cant do it properly then they shouldnt be doing it at all, I use good quality shielded RG6 with decent f connectors, not the crappy screw on ones you would use.

Do you have any other myths or wrong information you want me to correct?

I recently had my street to house and entry points re-routed as am having major extensions built.

The installer was excellent. I discussed the possible re- distribution of the VM signal to other locations as the work progresed. He suggested using the 20 odd metres of cable he had just replaced and left with me :D
 

PaulBox

Active Member
They don't come to your house and instigate a site survey or bring thumb screws with them (not unless you specifically ask for thumb screws in writing and in advance).

I am getting really sick of this....... How come I haven't received an email about the thumb screw service...:lease:

Probably gone to new customers first again...:rolleyes:

Don't they realise how VIP I am...:lesson:
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I am getting really sick of this....... How come I haven't received an email about the thumb screw service...:lease:

Probably gone to new customers first again...:rolleyes:

Don't they realise how VIP I am...:lesson:



Like I said "not unless you specifically ask for thumb screws in writing and in advance". The same goes for nipple clamps.
 

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