Matching surround speakers - which is more important: tweeter or midrange/bass?

phAge

Active Member
I have a setup with XTZ 99.36 fronts, 99.26 centre and an old Cerwin Vega sub. I'm looking for a new pair of rear surrounds (had XTZ 70.12's earlier - WAY to small for my 32m2 room) and now I'm torn between the XTZ 95.22 and the 93.21MK2.

I've noticed that the 93.21MK2 is decently sized (physically) for my room, can be wall-mounted AND has the same size 6.5" driver that is in my 99.36 fronts and 99.26 center. However, the tweeter is a softdome and not the ribbon that is in the other three speakers. The 95.22, on the other hand, only has a 5.25" driver but comes with a ribbon tweeter.

I'm not sure which is more important when it comes to matching rear speakers with front/centre ditto and if the different tweeters means that the speakers aren't sonically compatible? Also, is one type of tweeter inherently better suited to act the role as surround speaker? The rear speakers will be wall-mounted about 130 cm to the sides of the main listening position.

If cost isn't an issue, which would you recommend for rear speakers in my setup - the 95.22 with the matching ribbon tweeter or the 93.21MK2 with the bigger driver but softdome tweeter?
 

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
I would go for similar sounding top end so in this case the 95.22 which by the were designed specifically to compliment the 99 series. Its as close to a uniform sound as you'll get from direct firing rears and if you have the space ideally a 7.1 setup.
 

phAge

Active Member
Cheers. What about directionality, though - I thought softdome tweeters were better in this regard when used as rear surrounds?
 

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
It depends a lot on speaker design. It is inherent characteristic of high frequencies to be highly directional just as lower frequencies are omnidirectional, so directionality at higher frequencies is really a non issue and if one tweeter is less directional than another than that would suggest one is perhaps more capable of recreating higher frequencies or has been specifically designed with certain application in mind.

With surrounds the question really is one of dispersion characteristics, intended use, design, application and of course distance. Ribbon tweeters are well known for their wide horizontal dispersion and narrow vertical dispersion characteristics. In a large room with correct setup i would imagine these characteristics would be desirable for surround application to create that sense of envelopment that all surrounds aspire to. Of course using four of these surrounds in a 7.1 setup would likely increase coverage and overall widen the sweet spot.
 

phAge

Active Member
Re: Dispersion (and this may be a silly question) - but I'm assuming that good horizontal dispersion refers to a ribbon tweeter in a horizontal position (like this: ---) whereas good vertical dispersion comes from a ribbon oriented vertically (like this: ]).

I'm only asking because the tweeters in the 95.22 are vertical, which I'm assuming isn't what you want from a rear speaker? Again, I might have things entirely the wrong way around (and it seems odd for XTZ to make such a mistake - the tweeter in the 99.26 centre speaker is horizontally oriented...). :)
 

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
Re: Dispersion (and this may be a silly question) - but I'm assuming that good horizontal dispersion refers to a ribbon tweeter in a horizontal position (like this: ---) whereas good vertical dispersion comes from a ribbon oriented vertically (like this: ]).

I'm only asking because the tweeters in the 95.22 are vertical, which I'm assuming isn't what you want from a rear speaker? Again, I might have things entirely the wrong way around (and it seems odd for XTZ to make such a mistake - the tweeter in the 99.26 centre speaker is horizontally oriented...). :)
Its the other way round.
 

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