Massive increase in Spam and Fake Landline Calls

booyaka

Moderator
Not had landline for about 2 years now but had 5-6 calls on my mobile from National Insurance scam and National crime office scam
 

Rebecca Riot

Well-known Member
Did the scammer ring back, Rebecca?

And did you call out their fakery after your chat with the Amazon representative?
No, he didn't ring back as I think he realised he'd been rumbled. He sounded very convincing at first and told me that a gift card for £160 had been ordered on my account to be sent to an address in London. I said it wasn't me that had placed the order and would he cancel it immediately but then he asked me if I had placed the order on a laptop, tablet or phone which seemed a bit odd. He then told me to go on to Google and he would tell me what to type in and that's when I started to smell a rat as a genuine Amazon rep would be able to cancel it through the account. I don't quite know how this scam works but I'm glad I thwarted him.
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
I'm getting a spate of phone calls from shysters pretending to be from Amazon saying there has been a suspicious payment on my account. Sometimes it's a recorded voice but sometimes it's a real human. The first time it happened I wasn't sure if it was genuine or not so I told the man there was someone at the door and would he ring back 10 minutes later. As soon as I had got rid of him I went to my Amazon account and hit the 'call me' button and within 15 seconds a charming man in India phoned me. After a few security questions he went to check my account and said there had been no suspicious activity whatsoever and the caller had been a scammer. He also told me that Amazon will email rather than phone if they think an account has been hacked.
My mum (84) came within a hare's whisker of getting stung by that scam in January. She is usually quite sharp on such things but on this occasion she was nearly caught. I hold Amazon themselves slightly responsible for her being lulled into believing the scammer.

Mum only really uses Amazon at Christmas. It is a convenient way for an older person to get presents that people actually want using wish lists and direct ordering. Unfortunately you have to be really very careful not to end up with Amazon Prime. I have added it twice in the past while trying to be very careful not to add it. Because the scammers speak of a payment which is simialr to the cost of Amazon Prime all but the decimal point, they got past first base.

The guy went onto say don't worry I can refund you the 79.99 and Mum went along with that for a while. Then it reached a point where the scammer said "OMG I have pressed the wrong keys and I have refunded you £7999.99. Oh no I will loose my job etc." He wanted Mum to now contact her bank to reverse his incorrect action.

Fortuantely at that point she smelled a rat. Hung up, rang my brother who is a software engineer. He found they had downloaded some junk on her computer which he removed. She also got in touch with her bank who assured her neither the original £79.99 payment or any other payments had been taken from her account nor would they. So all ended well but she was still visably shaken by the experience when I arrived several hours later.

If Amazon didn't do this slightly cynical lure into Amazon Prime and make it something you have to avoid rather that something to actively choose, she wouldn't have believed the chap's opening statement.
 
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Xenomorph

Member
We just moved house and literally the only call I've received on my landline is that Amazon delivery scam. They kept calling, sometimes early morning.
My phone is now disconnected.
 

Judge Mental

Well-known Member
I am automatically suspicious of any landline call these days. I’ve had all the BT, Amazon, HMRC scamsters and it’s sometimes quite fun to play along with them. Occasionally they can be quite alarming when they realise what you are doing but usually they just hang up. One time I had an interesting chat with a guy about what he was doing. His rationale was that it was the only job available and he had nothing so assumed the people he was scamming could afford to lose a bit of what they had. No sense of guilt or shame at all.
 

An Thropologist

Well-known Member
I am automatically suspicious of any landline call these days. I’ve had all the BT, Amazon, HMRC scamsters and it’s sometimes quite fun to play along with them. Occasionally they can be quite alarming when they realise what you are doing but usually they just hang up. One time I had an interesting chat with a guy about what he was doing. His rationale was that it was the only job available and he had nothing so assumed the people he was scamming could afford to lose a bit of what they had. No sense of guilt or shame at all.
Well I know I am preaching to the choir here but his rationale makes no sense. If they just skimmed a few pounds - say £10 from many people his reasoning maybe justifiable, although it is still theft and still dispicable. But they don't just take a few bob, they clean out the people they scam. In some cases depriving the widow from her mite, the old soldier from his life savings etc. If he has no guilt or shame then he should rot in hell - to continue the metaphor.
 

Gordon Streeter

Active Member
Well I know I am preaching to the choir here but his rationale makes no sense. If they just skimmed a few pounds - say £10 from many people his reasoning maybe justifiable, although it is still theft and still dispicable. But they don't just take a few bob, they clean out the people they scam. In some cases depriving the widow from her mite, the old soldier from his life savings etc. If he has no guilt or shame then he should rot in hell - to continue the metaphor.
I couldn't agree more, do any of these "crooks" ever get prosecuted ? I have never seen any cases that have been in a court ? The Indian scamming shops are big business and it looks like nothing is being done to stop them, they assume it's a normal job of work !
 

Lucy Van Pelt

Distinguished Member
Not a clandline
I couldn't agree more, do any of these "crooks" ever get prosecuted ? I have never seen any cases that have been in a court ? The Indian scamming shops are big business and it looks like nothing is being done to stop them, they assume it's a normal job of work !

I was wondering that myself, is it because they are outside UK jurisdiction and therefore can do what they like?

Obviously not only India

Yesterday I checked a missed call (which I ignored on purpose) on the WhoCalledMe website

Some number based in Cote D'Ivoire (or Ivory Coast)

My phone number must be orbiting Jupiter
 

deans6571

Member
...since buying one of these, I can truthfully say its cut our spam calls down by 99%!!!

1621005666804.png


😎
 

Gordon Streeter

Active Member
Not a clandline


I was wondering that myself, is it because they are outside UK jurisdiction and therefore can do what they like?

Obviously not only India

Yesterday I checked a missed call (which I ignored on purpose) on the WhoCalledMe website

Some number based in Cote D'Ivoire (or Ivory Coast)

My phone number must be orbiting Jupiter
There has been a few cases in India and some have been given prison sentences, however these were for multi million pound scams and a few years back. I would hazard a guess that a blind eye is turned to a lot of them for a few bob as there are possibly hundreds of small scamming shops under the guise of "call centers" around the world. Unfortunately they can be set up in a very short space of time somewhere else if they get closed down.
 

Cassandra1956

Well-known Member
We were receiving up to 6 calls per day from automated numbers at one point atthe beginning of the year. It was infuriating. I didn't answer them, as the phones have caller display and I knew they were spam. I did attempt call blocking but found, like so many others, that the numbers change ever so slightly each time so you are constantly playing catch up.

Then I discovered our phone had a 'do not disturb' option. And with that you also have the option to ensure any numbers you call regularly or are in your personal phone book can be transferred to a preferential list, so they can still get through.

Switched on 'do not disturb', transferred all my preferred numbers over and voila! No more calls from spammers since. Nada. Zilch. None. Bliss.

They were mostly 'BT Internet Dept' (which is a non existent title. It's simply BT Internet, sans 'dept'). I have Virgin, so I knew they were spam. The other was Amazon Prime (which I am always very careful not to subscribe to. Sneaky sods make it difficult, though. The Prime option is in large letters, in an outlined box, whereastye opt out is in quite faint singular writing (no box) alongside. But I'm an expert at it now).

Few years ago, I did receive a call from 'Microsoft' purporting to be from the technical dept, informing me Windows was sending error messages. I told them I didn't have a computer (I do. I lied). I then told him he wasn't from Microsoft as they don't make unsolicited calls to anyone. And eventually, the guy swore at me, called me a motherf***** and my mum and son the same (told him my mum was dead and I don't have kids, which is true). Eventually I asked if he kissed his mother with that mouth and hung up. He stayed on the line, blocking my phone for several minutes after but I was going out anyway and figured he'd get bored eventually and go away. He did.
 

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