Mark’s garage conversion thread

Tempest

Member
It's a really thick pile carpet (i thought too nice a quality for a play room... but i got out voted), so those lines are hover marks so carpet fibers going in different directions. It's so thick we can't close the door and need to plane it... o_O

Thanks, I thought that might be the case, could not quite work the pattern out.

May I make a little suggestion to think about as opposed to wrecking the door for future needs?
Just change the hinges for some of these type and no messing with wood cutting and door bottom repaint?

 

Tempest

Member
^ Note, when you mention the topic of "Rising Butt" to your good lady, make sure you 1st explain you are talking about the door/carpet problem, and not something to address her saggy backside as you may get a slap ;)
 

MSW

Distinguished Member
So i guess this isn't the end of the story yet.... building control came out today and started questioning about insulation in the roof (the garage sticks out from the main property), and want evidence that there's insulation in it. So need to go up and move a few tiles and see if there is any, shouldn't be too much of an issue if there isn't, looking online it's just a case of getting some insulation and ramming it under.

That’s annoying, seams to me if they mentioned that at the begining of the build it’s so easy to cut a hole in existing garage ceiling to both check insulation and if necessary, cut a bigger hole to make it easier to fit any insulation. A
 

Tempest

Member
^ you can "blow in" insulation fibre" though via one of just a few very small holes if you want though.
Like cavity wall. little bits of rockwool fluffy clumps :)
 

markie g

Distinguished Member
Is that Invictus carpet?
Erm, i'm not sure actually. I just remember it being called Juno or something similiar (but that's likely the model of carpet,not the brand)
Building Control normally give you a timeline for the various inspections. Can’t remember now when your BC got involved?
They've been involved throughout (before work began, foundations, after brickwork, before and after flooring and before plasterboard went up) and it's annoying they now want pictures of the roof insulation. I guess it's for the best though, if it's not it could create cold spots, and leave to potential damp (apparently)
 

Tempest

Member
Just email them this photo.....
Should keep em happy :thumbsup:

32b76e95eb191333f1f74b0211044d00.png
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
They've been involved throughout (before work began, foundations, after brickwork, before and after flooring and before plasterboard went up) and it's annoying they now want pictures of the roof insulation. I guess it's for the best though, if it's not it could create cold spots, and leave to potential damp (apparently)
Ok only commented as my BC commented, about inspecting insulation before covering, and I haven’t even started. Guess they are all different.
 

markie g

Distinguished Member
Ok only commented as my BC commented, about inspecting insulation before covering, and I haven’t even started. Guess they are all different.
Insulation where? They did check we had insulation on the outer wall whilst doing brickwork. They're happy with just a picture for the roof side of things.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Insulation where? They did check we had insulation on the outer wall whilst doing brickwork. They're happy with just a picture for the roof side of things.
Converting my garage to a home cinema, taking old ceiling down to acoustically proof, they want to check existing insulation there. Then room within a room, and want to see the new stud work and floor insulation.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Erm, i'm not sure actually. I just remember it being called Juno or something similiar (but that's likely the model of carpet,not the brand)

They've been involved throughout (before work began, foundations, after brickwork, before and after flooring and before plasterboard went up) and it's annoying they now want pictures of the roof insulation. I guess it's for the best though, if it's not it could create cold spots, and leave to potential damp (apparently)

Sounds the same as when we done it. They came out pretty much after each step. Underpinning, came out and signed off. Flooring, came out and signed off. Windows, came out and signed off. The daft buggers who fitted the windows took all the stickers off and binned them. We had to dig them out and stick them back on :)

They had an issue with the windows because you could lock them. If there was a fire in the kitchen you have to use them to get out. I promised I'd never lock them and they accepted that. When they left I locked them. But I have the keys handy.
 

ruffage

Distinguished Member
Ours came back at the end of the extension build and said we'd need two mains fed smoke alarms. Good job it was before the new landing carpet went down so we could run the cables.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I'm so glad we did ours 20 years ago when we got planning and they said we didn't need building control...
The only stipulation: it was for office space, not living space. Which became living space 7 years later. And 13 years later we've passed the 10 year milestone too.
 

Tempest

Member
Would I be right or wrong in feeling this is all a load of old bull.

They will come down, all important and check things have been done to their standard.
But, if in x years time, either you or someone else have a problem with some aspect of it.
They will totally deny any responsibility for anything that is not correct.
 

Tempest

Member
I'm so glad we did ours 20 years ago when we got planning and they said we didn't need building control...
The only stipulation: it was for office space, not living space. Which became living space 7 years later. And 13 years later we've passed the 10 year milestone too.

Hey, if it's lasted this long than good chance it'll be fine for another 5 - 10 years.
So look on the bright side as by then you probably won't be around to need to worry ;)
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Would I be right or wrong in feeling this is all a load of old bull.

They will come down, all important and check things have been done to their standard.
But, if in x years time, either you or someone else have a problem with some aspect of it.
They will totally deny any responsibility for anything that is not correct.

You get paperwork issued stating it is all done to current standards.
 

Tempest

Member
You get paperwork issued stating it is all done to current standards.

Thanks.
Would be interesting to see in the future if something was found that's not, due to a poor inspection at the time, or someone simply skipping something, if they are then legally liable.
Or if it's more like an MOT on your car.
The second you leave the MOT station, it's not their fault as they can just say it was ok when they looked at it :)

It's only that I have a bit of a niggle, when some get all uppety about something you have, and insist on things, but if something goes wrong, they want nothing to do with it.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Thanks.
Would be interesting to see in the future if something was found that's not, due to a poor inspection at the time, or someone simply skipping something, if they are then legally liable.
Or if it's more like an MOT on your car.
The second you leave the MOT station, it's not their fault as they can just say it was ok when they looked at it :)

It's only that I have a bit of a niggle, when some get all uppety about something you have, and insist on things, but if something goes wrong, they want nothing to do with it.

They sign off on all the important stuff. From underpinning to insulation. You have to leave stuff exposed for them to get in and have a look. If you don't you run the risk of opening stuff up so they can inspect. I don't think there is any scope for skipping anything.

Pretty sure the guy overseeing ours was out at least six times. He was also very helpful.

As @ufo550 says. The only annoying thing is the lack of consistency from one council to another.
 

Tempest

Member
I’m not sure where all this criticism of Building Control comes; they are only requiring you to comply with the Approved Documents. I think the only true criticism, is the lack of consistency between councils and sometimes Inspectors.

Apologies, it was getting late, and I might have been in grumpy mood ;)

I was just thinking how annoying it can be, if you get some over zealous person being overly picky about some aspects of work, or requiring things to be stopped or un-done for some reasons.

Honestly I understand why and fully support that things are done correctly. NOT for the current resident/owner, but for future ones, so they know they are not buying into problems

I was just (grumpy mood) pondering that, ok, so the inspectors are coming round, and making sure everything MUST be done to THEIR standards. That's great.
So if that is the case, then in 10 years time, if there is a problem, and it turns out something was not 100% they will take some liability for saying it was back then and not washing their hands of it.

That's all :)
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Building regulations change all the time. All you can do is ensure what you are doing is up to scratch at that moment in time.

The council are very helpful and try to make it as easy as possible, from my experience. Also, any tradesmen you have to get in know their stuff. They have to do stuff right or they won't get paid.
 

mikes48

Distinguished Member
It's a really thick pile carpet (i thought too nice a quality for a play room... but i got out voted), so those lines are hover marks so carpet fibers going in different directions. It's so thick we can't close the door and need to plane it... o_O

Tip of the day - make sure you plane the bottom of the door, not the top, as a dim-witted former work colleague of mine once did after having new carpet fitted - then wondering why is was still tight 🤔 :facepalm:.
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
Tip of the day - make sure you plane the bottom of the door, not the top, as a dim-witted former work colleague of mine once did after having new carpet fitted - then wondering why is was still tight 🤔 :facepalm:.

Last year when redecorating my sons bedroom he opted for a thick pile carpet rather than wooden floors. This meant I'd need to plane off the bottom of the doors. We have solid mahogany doors which are very heavy.
I checked a few Youtube videos and it seemed fairly straightforward, leave all fixings in place, remove the hinge pins and slide the door off. Only thing I didn't have was a wood plane.

Fast forward a few days and my 80 yr old father in law said he would do it for us. I came home from work to find him in the garage sawing an inch off the bottom of the door with a hand saw, having removed all the brackets :eek: . Fortunately, we got the door back on and his rough work can't be seen but it was a lesson learned for me. We are about to redecorate another couple of bedrooms and again my daughters have opted for carpet so the job will have to be done again, but this time I'll be either doing it myself or getting a joiner in.
If people don't know what they are doing, why volunteer?
 

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