Marantz SR6012 Light Weight Receiver

annamiata

Novice Member
I just bought a used Marantz SR6012 for $700.00. Everything works as it should but I am full of regret. As soon I opened the box and felt the weight (or no weight at all). It felt like an empty box. It reminded of my college dome Sony Receiver of the early 90s. I owned two receivers. They are the Pioneer Elite THX ($700.00 when new in 2000) and Onkyo TX-SR-805 THX Ultra 2 ($1,000 new) certified since last ten years. These two receivers were two beasts and each weight around 50 pounds. Pioneer Elite was an old school and I removed from movie theater and still used in my bed room. I just swapped out the Onkyo yesterday and replaced with Marantz SR6012. The main reason was HDMI 2.2 for the new projector and ultra HD player HDMI connections. I tested the Marantz internal amp and compared to the Pioneer and Onkyo internal amps. Both of my Pioneer and Onkyo receivers' sound level put Marantz SR6012 to shame in my large theater room. I recalled both Pioneer (110 watt rms x 5 at 0.05% THD ) and Onkyo (130 watts x 7 into 8 ohms (20-20,000 Hz) at 0.05% THD) had no problem and played with authority in my large theater room. I do have a dedicated 3,000 cubic feet plus, large home theater, with dedicated 18 channels THX separate amplifiers for all channels and four separate THX amps for four subwoofers. Both Onkyo and Pioneer have dedicated THX reference mode for watching movie which Marantz does not have only used the Pioneer and Onkyo internal processors with dedicated amps. Marantz will be used a processor only as well.

Another issue, Marantz display is a gimmick. A tiny display only shown source and level. I have no idea what audio option the processor choose or what audio option I have chosen in blueray of UHD menu.

Stay away from the Marantz SR6s line if you have large room of 3,000 cubic feet. I guess no one makes receivers that can driven all channels like they used to be. I will hold on to these two old beasts.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Most information can be seen via the onscreen display options. The receiver will mix its own graphics into the video passing through it. If you wanted a full sized display then you'd have been better suited to the Denon AVRX3400. This is basically the same as the Marantz SR6012. Either tis of look at the model above yours which has both the potyholr display and a full sized display concealed under a drop down flay on the front.

Weifgt is something you'd find has reduced on all models. It is basically a matter of the PSU being made differently and not needing to be the size =used previopusly, but yes, cheaper chassis cinstruction is also to blame.

If you'd a large room then why buy an AV receiver that has a power rating such as that of the Marantz model in question? You want or need more power means you'll pay more for it. You could simply add external power to the AV receiver in order to attain the required power.

There's nothing wrong with the SR6012. You simply bought a receiver that isn't powerful enough. THe power ratings are quire easy to access for this receiver so why didn't you buy a receiver with the power you'd need?
 
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Mr Wolf

Active Member
Sounds like something's wrong here - maybe the SR6012 is running in some ECO mode or set for 4OHM speakers or something. Either that or I think you were sold a dud.

In practice, 110W per channel shouldn't sound appreciably down on any other AVR's output. Take a top of the line Denon AVC-X8500 or Yamaha RX-A3080 which are both rated at 150W/channel. While this is 36% more Watts than 110W, this should only yield an extra 1.3dB which equates to a paltry 10% increase in perceived loudness. And that's assuming you actually need the extra watts in the first place.

I've never got to the bottom of the weight loss observation. I'd always assumed it was due to using smaller heatsinks and becoming more reliant on fan supported cooling.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Think you'll find that all the figures you have quoted on the Pioneers and Onkyos are just for two channel driven, not the full compliment of channels available. All AV amps draw their power from one PSU and the power gets shared around. Marantz say that with all channels driven the output is 70%. So very comparable to what you've previously experienced.

If you feel power is lacking, or your bigger room needs filling then the Marantz has the requisite pre-outs to enable a power amp to be integrated into the system.
 

annamiata

Novice Member
I was just testing the internal amp and was not intent to use internal amp at all. Receiver was not in Eco mode and not 4 ohms setting. I bought this unit for the pre-amp processor usage only. I do have separate THX certified amplifies for all channels and subwoofers. I just checked THX website and looked for certified THX receivers and there were non from Marantz, Pioneer, Yamaha, nor Onkyo that have THX ultra certified for 3,000 cubic feet room. Manufacturers would have to sell receiver in the four to five thousand dollars to have a receiver with 11.2 THX ultra certification. Set up I have now are three Kenwood KMZ-1 amps. They are all THX certified and each has 6 channel rate at 130 watt rms with less than .05% . I am only using 11 channels. These used to cost couple thousand dollars each in 1996. I also used four Kenwood MX-500 THX certified in bridge mode at 270 watt rms. I hope these amps lasted me a lifetime. I upgrade
IMG_0368.jpg
processor every 5 years or so.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
THX certification means little if anything. Many AV receivers would surpass what is required for such certification. Yamaha explained it best and said "Why do we need someone else to tell us what we already know?". No one bothers with it because they don't need a third party to tell them that their products can do something they built that product to do and then charge them for telling them what they already knew. You'd simply be paying for the badge and THX certified products are not better or superior to those devoid of such certification. It isn't even an official standard.

THX is no longer as well regarded as they used to be, especially since refusing to make public what they are testing and after some of the products that were certified turning out to not actually meet the known criteria for certification after being scruntinised by independent authorities on the subjrct.

The problem is that your average consumer thinks the moment they see the THX logo, something magical is going to happen and it will be like the old Maxell ads of the man being blown back in his chair by the amazing sound of his stereo. Without some major tweaking, which is usually best down by a THX certified installer, you’re never going to get the true quality of the system from just placing the speakers around your room as you see fit.

There have been many to raise this question before us if THX was worth it, and even to go so far as to wonder if it was a scam to make the consumer think they are getting more for their dollar. We would never go so far as to say it is a scam, but we would say there are many high quality pieces of equipment out there that don’t carry the THX certification logo. If you find yourself debating two pieces of equipment, and one of them happens to have the THX logo and costs a bit more, then we say skip it. If it’s the same price, then why not go for it?

I think people would rather pay extra for physical improvements and better components as opposed to a THX badge?

People are more likely to own a THX T-shirt or a mug than anything actually THX certidied and THX are quite happy to sell people T-shirts and mugs.

Why on earth are you moaning about the SR6012's power if not using it? AS I said earlier, its rated output isn't a secret and Marantz have never claimed it to be a power house receiver. It is basically a budget 9 channel receiver. People buy it to attain the features associated with a 9 channel model at a price they can afford. The thing you'd be sacrificing is the power associated with the higher tier models that cost more.
 
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Mr Wolf

Active Member
For home audio, THX Certification (quite rightly IMO) went into decline about 15 years ago when Yamaha and Denon stopped seeking it for their higher end receivers. It added unnecessary cost to products, particularly those with short lifecycles. Also with the growth of technical review sites like AH and S&V consumers preferred to rely on rigorous independent product testing than a (paid) stamp of approval from a self-appointed authority that refused to even publish details of the standards it was accrediting.

Denon's official position on THX certification

"Why do our A/V receiver not have THX (ultra) certification?

Since the end of 1998 there has been two standards, THX Ultra and THX Select. THX-certified theaters provide a high-quality, predictable playback environment to ensure that any film soundtrack mixed in THX will sound as near as possible to the intentions of the mixing engineer.

The certification process for Ultra is rigid. THX also provides certified theaters with a special crossover circuit whose use is part of the standard to play in larger rooms .THX Select is a low-cost variant, intended for smaller premises. For summer 2002, the THX standard has been revised.

This new standard with more stringent requirements is THX Ultra 2 These standards comply with our AVC A1SE upgrade A1SR AVC, AVC A1SRA, AThx,11XVA AVC, AVC-A1HD, AVP-A1HD and AVC A1XVA. Most A/V receivers over £500 meet or exceed the requirements of the Select or Ultra-norm by far. Equivalent circuits for THX Re-Equalization (Cinema EQ), Bass Management and Timbre Matching (Room EQ).

Since it makes little sense from our point of view to invest in this at additional cost we decided to forego this certification."
 

annamiata

Novice Member
THX certification means little if anything. Many AV receivers would surpass what is required for such certification. Yamaha explained it best and said "Why do we need someone else to tell us what we already know?". No one bothers with it because they don't need a third party to tell them that their products can do something they built that product to do and then charge them for telling them what they already knew. You'd simply be paying for the badge and THX certified products are not better or superior to those devoid of such certification. It isn't even an official standard.

THX is no longer as well regarded as they used to be, especially since refusing to make public what they are testing and after some of the products that were certified turning out to not actually meet the known criteria for certification after being scruntinised by independent authorities on the subjrct.



I think people would rather pay extra for physical improvements and better components as opposed to a THX badge?

People are more likely to own a THX T-shirt or a mug than anything actually THX certidied and THX are quite happy to sell people T-shirts and mugs.

Why on earth are you moaning about the SR6012's power if not using it? AS I said earlier, its rated output isn't a secret and Marantz have never claimed it to be a power house receiver. It is basically a budget 9 channel receiver. People buy it to attain the features associated with a 9 channel model at a price they can afford. The thing you'd be sacrificing is the power associated with the higher tier models that cost more.
A $1,500.0 retail price for a receiver is not considered a budget price to an average consumer. I do agreed of dislike logos on shirt and hats. THX badges meant third party certification of what ever listed are true numbers. I just swapped out the Marantz SR6012 back to my Onkyo TX-SR805. Sold SR6012 at $400.00 at a lost after less than one week of use. I only used four processing modes when I used the Onkyo receiver as a pre-amp. (Ultra 2 plus, THX 7.1 neutral, All Channels stereo, and direct).

Marantz SR6012

Pro: two subwoofers independent adjustment
HDR10 pass through compatible

Cons: Gimmicks display reads out.
Weak Power amplification
Annoying all channels stereo with 7.2.4 set up. 4 height ceiling speakers can not switch off while listening to all stereo channels.
Oven hot
Dolby Atmos hype
Audyssey calibration got wrong almost every time. My manual calibration using laser tape and sound meter turned out better sound.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
A THX badge on the receiver means nothing. It will not make that AV receiver perform any better than it performs without such a badge.

All that THX are doing is telling you what the manufacturer already knows. Why the hell would they need to pay a self affilated ombudsman for such a service? The certification is not a stadard nor independant and is devised, administrated and overseen by THX. THX a a for profit company.

Here's when things started going south for THX:

You suggest it isn't a budget model so I'll ask you what other 9 channels models is it you are comparing with that meet all your criteria and sell for less? You'd be looking at the comparable DEnon model with the exact same power rating or maybe a Pioneer or Onkyo model with less favourable reviews. THe comparable Marantz and DEnon 9 channel models than superceded the SR6012 are and havebeen the cheapest 9 channel options on the market year in and year out. THey are Marantz and DEnon's entry level 9 channel models. If you wanted more power then why didn't you buy a receiver with more power?

Stop repeatedly insisting it is under powered. It has a rated power output that match what Marantz publically quote for it. It is your fault ig you didn't ensure this was enough for your need prior to buying the receiver. If you need more power then you should have bought a more powerful AV receiver. Besides this, you suggest that you are using external power amplification so what difference does it make as to how powerful the SR6012 is?

By the way, all channel stereo is supposed to engaged all channels . THat is its purpose and is is supposed to portray steoreo sources using all of the speakers present. All AV receiver do the same thing with their implementation of thos or similar modes. Yopu dopn't appear to actually know what this mode is or what it does?

Atmos hype? Marantz didn't devise Atmos and it is a format devised by Dolby. How is this AV receiver or Marantz responsible for hyping it?

No, your manual calibration isn't correct because laser measuring devices measure distance and not audio delay. I can almost gurantee that the Audyssey mic measured the time it took the test tone to reach it more accurately than you with a tape measure or similar laser device.
 
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The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Marantz SR6012

Pro: two subwoofers independent adjustment
HDR10 pass through compatible

Cons: Gimmicks display reads out.
Weak Power amplification
Annoying all channels stereo with 7.2.4 set up. 4 height ceiling speakers can not switch off while listening to all stereo channels.
Oven hot
Dolby Atmos hype
Audyssey calibration got wrong almost every time. My manual calibration using laser tape and sound meter turned out better sound.

Having owned a 6012 for a couple of years in a dedicated room, only recently replacing it with an 8805 I find it strange that most of what you've written as Cons I disagree with, or are known features - which does beg the question, if you dislike it so much, why on earth did you buy it in the first place?

Display readout - it's on all Marantz models over recent years - if you really don't like it, buy the Denon equivalent!

Weak power amplification - not really, no. I used it in a 2600cuft room, and it played to Reference-10 (my usual listening level) with ease. I do have easy to drive speakers though, maybe you should look there before declaring something is underpowered? Having said that, like you, I do run a couple of multichannel amps to actually provide the muscle - I just used the 6012 as is for a couple of weeks when I first bought it to make sure it actually worked as advertised - it did!

Annoying all channels stereo - Dante has pretty much covered that, and as it's a mode I don't use, I could care less!

Oven hot - yep. I can agree with that, even using external amps, the 6012 (and apparently it's senior siblings) get pretty toasty - you don't want to enclose it too tightly.

Dolby Atmos hype - Well, I have to laugh at this one - if you've never experienced a well set up Atmos system, I feel for you. Atmos, and other '3D' surround formats, have been the biggest audio upgrade in years - audibly akin to the move from VHS to DVD. If you haven't set up your speakers to take advantage of it, and left your surrounds where they were running just 7.1 or some such, there's a good chance you don't have decent separation between the base layer and the overhead speakers. i.e. it'll sound muddy - possibly.

Audyssey calibration - lots has been written about Audyssey over the years, some of it quite uncomplimentary, but equally, there are plenty of us that get along quite well with Audyssey, particularly XT32 paired with the iPad app - you did use the app, didn't you?!

Audio can be very subjective - people obsess over measurements using REW and the like (I know I've done it), but at the end of the day, it's your system, and should sound as you like it. As far as Audyssey goes, there are a multitude of things you can tweak to blend your subs for example and generally get a very pleasing sound that integrates well - but if you don't know the methodology, and just hit 'calibrate' and leave it at that, it can be a bit hit and miss, particularly in a challenging room. The less work it has to do (by treating your room) the better; oh, and stop it doing anything above 500Hz (which can only be done using the app)!

All in all, I've found the 6012 to be the best value AVR capable of providing 11 channels of processing out of any on the market, bar none! Used to provide exactly that in a 7.2.4 system, it excelled at everything that was asked of it - so much so that the step up to the 8805, so far, has been a little underwhelming! (I don't dislike the 8805, but I haven't got it dialled in fully yet, so the difference hasn't been night and day as I thought it might be)!

If you are using it in a lesser setup, say, without Atmos, or generally smaller speaker count, there may be other AVRs out there that compare well enough - but for what it does, there isn't another AVR to touch it. I like it so much that I've kept mine, as I plan on using it in the snug room (once I've found a way of fitting 9 speakers in there)!

Oh, I went from an Onkyo 818 to the 6012 - the only thing I'd say about the Onkyo, is that it was very 'forward', to the point of being brash - all muscle and little sensitivity. Which is great for 'wham bam' action movies - the Marantz is certainly a little more laid back - but it still doesn't lack power! And the Audyssey of the Onkyo wasn't a patch on the XT32 variant the Marantz has.
 

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