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Making a DIY screen any help

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by realitybites, Jun 4, 2003.

  1. realitybites

    realitybites
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    I have seen a few posts on DIY screens, anyone got any sort of design they have used successfully and wouldn't mind sharing with the world (Patent pending ):laugh:
     
  2. theritz

    theritz
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    realitybites,

    You'll find a decent description/instructions here . Versions vary as to the exact construction of the frame, and I used blackout lining (you'll get it from any shop that sells curtain material - cheap, "rubbery" surface on one side, usually 54" wide, sold by the yard.


    Sean G.
     
  3. Captain chaos

    Captain chaos
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    I had an estimate of how much a pull down screen (blind) would cost to make. I was given the figure of around £100 for a 2 metre wide by 1.5 up.
    This I gather is still quite dear, this quote was from John Lewis, im sure a cheaper bathroom / blind shop can offer a better price.
     
  4. realitybites

    realitybites
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    Thanks for info, will give these a go and find the cheapest
    cheers
     
  5. tonytigerrr

    tonytigerrr
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    realitybites,

    I used the info at this link to build my screen
    http://members.shaw.ca/danhanson/Theater/screen/screenproject.htm

    Similar to the one theritz pointed you to but it contains a useful link to an artist site which explains how to stretch canvas over a frame properly - using the right technique will help avoid nasty wrinkles in the screen.

    I built an 80 x 45 inch screen, total cost £17 (I already had the wood) - good luck ........
     
  6. Insp.Gadget

    Insp.Gadget
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    Tupplur roller blind from Ikea, 2 metres wide, no construction required, in white or grey (same colour as Da-Lite HCCV material) and only 20 nuggets :)
    oh, and no noticeable ripples either.
     
  7. realitybites

    realitybites
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    Keep em comin, seems to be getting cheaper and cheaper, might get to the point where they'll pay me to use their screens with any luck.
     
  8. Thrash

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    The screen I constructed was made from 2x2 timber made into a box section with angle brackets then blackout material stretched over the frame and stapled with a staple gun. The screen is perfectly smooth with no ripples and gives a great picture. All the bits were bought from B&Q and the price including a cheap stable gun was less than £25. This is obviously a fixed screen but if you don't need to hide it then it's the cheapest option.
     
  9. Berko_Stan

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    65" diagonal piece of thin MDF painted with Dulux Icestorm 5 (or was it 6) over the fireplace. Fireplace limits the size.

    I wonder how many newbies (I'm not far off one) on here use a white screen for their LCD projector, not knowing the difference that a grey one makes.

    I literally stood open mouthed in amazement when I went from a matt white painted wall (and a standard white screen, which was identical) to my Icestorm.

    There was a David Attenborough thing on at the time, and it was like looking through a window into the Savannah (or wherever he was).

    At first it looks weird as you lose the brightness, but that loses all relevance once you get used to the new dynamics, with deep, rich colour, and something actually approaching black!

    Couldn't watch a white screen again...

    Ian.
     
  10. browsking

    browsking
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    Can you remember if its 5 or 6 (icestorm) cos I think I'm gonna give it a go?
     
  11. Berko_Stan

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    Go to a DIY shed that has a Dulux paint mixing doohickey.
    Look at all the sample cards in the rack. Toward the end you'll find the greys and the Icestorms.
    Go by shade. I went for the darker one because I'm a Real Man with muscles on my teeth, but you could wimp out and go for the lighter one.
    Just remember; the darker the shade, the darker the viewing room needs to be, but the richer the colours and the deeper the 'blacks' will be as you lower the bottom of your dynamic range.
    The down side is that your whites will start to look grey if you go too dark with the paint, but you really don't notice once you have no pure white to compare it to.

    Your mileage may vary, as I project a smaller, brighter image than most, due to size restrictions.

    You can buy a £1 tester pot of each before you commit yourself, but remember not to do half and half comparisons, as you'll always write the darker colour off as reducing the whites too much. Once you're watching movies for real, it's a different story.

    BTW, I get a perfectly watchable image for Eastenders type viewing in a normally lit room with my AE100. We use (used) it as our main telly.

    Good luck.
    Ian.
     

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