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Macro v Super macro with flowers/insects

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by kbfern, Aug 26, 2005.

  1. kbfern

    kbfern
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    I am looking at getting a new digital slr style camera like a minolta Z5/6 or Fuji 5500 or the new 5600 when it comes out in a month or so.

    My question is when taking close up's of flowers and insects for instance do you need supermacro or can you get just as good a picture with macro focusing at around 4" rather than the 10mm of supermacro.

    I am asking this as I like the look of the new fuji 5600 as reading reviews on the 5500 show it to be an excellent camera and the 5600 seems to improve on it with faster start up and less lag between shots and also some form of camera shake control.The Z5 has these atributes already and also has supermacro where the fuji's don't and as I intend to do a fair bit of close work I wonder how much better the supermacro feature is.
     
  2. kenlynch

    kenlynch
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    If you are taking photos of flowers and insects you want to be much further away than 10mm. You'll block out any light and scare away what you want to take a photo of (if it's an insect).

    Although compact camera manufacturers go on about how close you can focus, macro is nothing to do with how close you can focus but about creating an image on the sensor that is the same size as the subject or better. Most SLR lenses that are for macro usually specify a ratio 1:1, 1:2 etc but I don't think they bother to specify this with compact cameras, which makes a comparison hard as focusing distance doesn't give you any indication about magnification.

    From what I can tell about "super macro" is that it is only going to be useful on back-lit subjects and therefore probably not that useful.
     
  3. Ikki

    Ikki
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    It's a problem that I have been wrestling with using a compact (Pentax Optio 750z) for a while. You will need to use the standard macro setting at the telephoto end. The downside of this is that digi compact zooms are a bit slow at this end requiring slower shutter speeds, combined with excessive noise at higher iso numbers. The second problem is that trying to sharply focus on a small, possibly moving object with a depth of field of a few millimetres on an lcd screen or an evf is almost impossible to do with a high rate of success and the cameras autofocus in my experience has great difficulty with this sort of target.

    As a result I am probably going to go down the dslr route with a proper macro lens. The new KM 5D looks interesting with the antishake which could be useful. Not ruling out compact/prosumers completely, I am going to have a look at the new Fuji 9500 as it looks otherwise excellent, but I think that it will still fail on the focussing issue.

    If you do want a compact/prosumer, make sure that it has the following: good minimum focussing distance and large aperture at the telephoto end in macro mode. A flip out and twist display. Antishake would be good. The ability to either screw in close up lenses to the end of the lens such as the Fuji 7000 & the Olympus 8080W or to take a lens adapter/closeup combo such as the Canon A95. I don't think that the Fuji 5600 has any sort of antishake, they just whack the iso setting up to max allowing faster shutter speeds. The evf has 115,000 pixels, which is not really enough for this type of focussing, but try it out, it may be ok.
     
  4. kbfern

    kbfern
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    Thanks for the info gents,I need to look into this a little more before I make my mind up which camera will suit my needs better.

    Ikki,regarding the advance info on the forthcoming Fuji 5600 it is supposedly going to include some sort of anti shake feature,As my budget is only going to be around £250 I will probably have to make some sort of compromise on the spec of the camera.
     
  5. Ikki

    Ikki
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    kbfern, check out the info on the Fuji S5600

    Fuji 5600

    All they do in anti blur mode is increase the iso setting and therefore the shutter speed, it's not the same as ccd or in lens antishake as found in KM and Canon cameras as well as others. These latter methods of controlling camera movement can be used in low light and with low shutter speed. Also have a look at the Panasonic FZ5 which is near your price and has an image stabilised 12X zoom.
     

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