Lyngdorf MP-60 AV Processor Review & Comments

Rob Sinden

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Speakers are not perfect, but most people I deal with spend a great deal of time and money choosing models they really like. When they have found them, they don’t want them changed. They want them to sound the way they designed to sound in their room.

Dirac etc. do not give you the choice of leaving your speakers the way they were intended. Whether you choose a target curve or you run the default, it will be changing the characteristics of your speakers.

If you have good quality speakers, this makes no sense to me. Its like buying a Ferrari and then using software to make it run like a Porsche.

Why would I say the system that is more fun is worse? That would be ridiculous.

Most people like a bit more bass when watching movies or say dance music. If this is applied in the room correction, you will have too much bass on all content. Excessive bass on say jazz or classical music will ruin the sound.

This is why room correction should preserve the qualities of your speakers while removing room errors.

Tonal changes such as adding more bass should be applied separately, once correction has been done. You need different Voicings depending on the content being listened to, the volume level you are playing, personal preference etc.
 

KelvinS1965

Distinguished Member
Dirac etc. do not give you the choice of leaving your speakers the way they were intended. Whether you choose a target curve or you run the default, it will be changing the characteristics of your speakers.
Sorry I can't help myself: Dirac allows you to limit the range that you are correcting, so if you chose to just correct the frequency response up to (say) 500Hz and leave the rest of the speaker's range intact, then you can.

Also If you really want to you can follow the frequency response of your speakers and adjust the target curve to a point between fully correcting and no correction. Admittedly that is one for the advanced fiddlers, but it's still possible. Even a combination of the limit (say 10Khz) and following the response to reduce the correction and retain the speaker's response.

Or you can just use a default target curve, or import one if you want the easier route: That's the only option that 'changes your speakers' in the way you keep saying.

I had mistakenly thought that the voicings were adjustable, so I appreciate the feedback as I was tempted by a used MP50 I've seen, though I really don't need to be spending money like that at the moment, especially on a non essential like AV...
 

iamimpossible

Active Member
Thanks I was just writing a similar response.
 

Rock Danger

Distinguished Member

Rock Danger

Distinguished Member
I also think there's a little bit of confusion here - saying 'you can only eq up whatever hz' is all well and good within whatever room eq eco system you're using, including your curves, curtains etc. I think ARC Genesis will do this too and maybe even the new Audyssey app?

This doesn't mean necessarily that you're going to get the same results to your ears that Room Perfect delivers. There's plenty of testimony to that, especially those listening to 2ch audio, which a lot would argue is the more critical test.

Also with Dirac, it's never really finished, has numerous bugs (depending on what manufacturer you choose) and has several different versions, again depending on what you buy. This is not the case with Room Perfect, it's pretty much flat across the range.

My only concern is that I hope they don't use this as an excuse to rest on their laurels, but when you see what they're doing behind the scenes with new products then there is some hope.

I didn't buy my speakers, put them in the room and think, well I like this about them but not that - I made sure I heard them on different systems and different rooms - In my case they are and remain a pretty neutral speaker, in comparison the B&W for example which is to my ears a bit aggressive on cutting treble.

Room EQ is not created equal and certainly not the set up and reliability of the results. Just to be clear I'm not anti Dirac, the best version I've heard of it has been the Storm, but I don't think it was as tight in the bass on the same system in the same room but a good product imo.
 

Rock Danger

Distinguished Member
Interested!
Please share
Nothing room perfect related and not sure I'm allowed to and the stuff I do know is limited. Lyngdorf play their cards pretty close. I can say that the new and much delayed 8ch power amp, should in effect completely pimp slap everything out there.
 

markymiles

Distinguished Member
Isn't it based on the same Purifi modules that are in use by NAD, Nord etc. So more likely, it will in fact be very similar to those but with a very much inflated price, certainly compared to the NAD. Rather strange decision going for 8 channel too. What's that for, 7 base layer speakers and one height :D
 
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Rock Danger

Distinguished Member
Isn't it based on the same Purifi modules that are in use by NAD, Nord etc. So more likely, it will in fact be very similar to those but with a very much inflated price. Rather strange decision going for 8 channel too. What's that for, 7 base layer speakers and one height :D
Purify modules yes. But there's more to it than that and when it's out next year you can look at all the specs on it and decide on the VFM side of it.

I thought 8 was a weird choice too - I suppose the thinking is that you'd have 16ch and have 2 of them? Steinway Lyngdorf have a 4ch power amp - I'm not sure why, I never cared to ask because it doesn't affect me personally.
 

PascalP

Active Member
Isn't it based on the same Purifi modules that are in use by NAD, Nord etc. So more likely, it will in fact be very similar to those but with a very much inflated price. Rather strange decision going for 8 channel too. What's that for, 7 base layer speakers and one height :D
8 channels for surrounds and heights in a 7.1.4 setup and a separate 3 channel for LCR?
 

markymiles

Distinguished Member
Actually, I've amended my post, if comparing it to the Nord it's not too badly priced and will of course match your other gear which some people like to do. Either way, will be a great power amp.
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member
Rather strange decision going for 8 channel too.

8 channels for surrounds and heights in a 7.1.4 setup and a separate 3 channel for LCR?
8 channels is right as far as I’m concerned. A lot of 16 channel processors now, so 2 of these works pretty much perfectly. If it was a 7 channel you’d be short even if you had 2 of them.

It’s the same with the trinnov amplitude.
 

markymiles

Distinguished Member
I suppose it does make sense for a bit of future proofing. Wonder how many people will have 16 speakers in their room?!?
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member
I suppose it does make sense for a bit of future proofing. Wonder how many people will have 16 speakers in their room?!?
Me 😎

But in all seriousness, if they’re making 16 channel processors, they need to accommodate the channel count in their power amps. I think you’ll find more and more people increase channel count if they can. The difference for me from 7.x.4 to 9.x.6 even in a small room has been massive.
 

Rock Danger

Distinguished Member
Me, I suppose? These things are marketed towards high end theatre systems of which there are some. The reality is that 5.1 is the most commonly used AV setup by far and usually something from D&M.

I'd also say that a fair few that have only 7ch and want a really nice power amp will likely buy it too so i guess that's another few percent?
 

markymiles

Distinguished Member
Haha, I don't doubt but I wouldn't put you in the normal person category. I'm sure you're waiting for 20, 24 , 30 channels being the norm. In fact why bother with walls and ceiling at all :D
 

Saul Goodman

Distinguished Member
8 channels is right as far as I’m concerned. A lot of 16 channel processors now, so 2 of these works pretty much perfectly. If it was a 7 channel you’d be short even if you had 2 of them.

It’s the same with the trinnov amplitude.
Wouldn't one of those 16 be a subwoofer though?
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member

Rob Sinden

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
When Dirac is operating, it will be changing the native response of your speaker to something different. You can reduce the frequency range is affecting but the other frequencies will be changed.

It is not correcting the sound of your speakers to minimise room errors, it is changing the sound of them to match a pre determined response.

The direct measurement that RoomPerfect takes creates a curve unique to your speakers and you room. This combined with the additional measurement helps it understand the natural characteristics of your speakers. From here is can preserve them while removing room errors.

Dirac has a PRE DETERMINED curve built into it, or that you can create that has nothing to do with your speakers or your room. Run it on three different speakers and they will all sound tonally similar. Do the same with RoomPerfect and they won’t.

Please try it, its very easy to hear.

It is not possible or desirable to take an ideal response of your speaker and to try and mimic it.

Again, please try it and you’ll hear it sounds awful.

The Voicings are adjustable.
 

mb3195

Distinguished Member
True, but some do custom configs. So you've paid big bucks for a channel sat twiddling its thumbs.
But it’s a nice channel twiddling it’s thumbs 😎

I don’t think the likes of Lyngdorf, trinnov, etc are interested in custom channel count, it’s simply not in their business model.
 

Rock Danger

Distinguished Member
I think if you're spending Lyngdorf, Trinnov or Storm (also do an 8ch) money etc, people aren't likely to be worried about one channel spare, should that happen vs a custom channel amp that's potentially not as good.

It's obvious that 8ch has become a normal thing in these price circles now, it's not like you're going to be slaving the above to a Denon or Arcam for example - there's power amps built to that price point and for that tier of AVR or processor.
 

Seriously Ltd

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
The Lyngdorf MXA 8400 is going to be an incredible power amp. 8x400w or 4x800w. 137db signal to noise ratio.
BTW Peter Lyngdorf is one of the guys behind Purify technology.
 

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