Looks like HDMI is a white elephant?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by PhilipL, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    One reason for HDMI was to get high definition from Blu-ray/HD DVD players, as it was planned that component outputs would be down converted to lower resolutions to prevent piracy. HDMI being digital could be encrypted of course hence it's real introduction, so we have all rushed out to buy HDMI equipped TVs.

    However in a change of heart by Sony and now other manufactures it looks like component analogue outputs will be allowed to output the full HD resolutions, so HDMI isn't necessarily required.

    Also worth noting on this report regarding upscalling for all those falling for the marketing regarding HDMI on standard definition DVD recorders/players:

    Sony and other consumer-electronics companies have also added the "upconvert" function to the next-generation players, in an effort to boost the image quality. However, to make the same disk look different after upconversion to HD resolutions would require a TV set of minimum 50 inches.

    Full report here: http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/News/Details.aspx?NewsId=16635

    Regards

    Phil
     
  2. ROYOLD

    ROYOLD
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    I never wanted it anyway.

    There was an item in Saturday's Daily Mail which stated that consumers were being misled by statements of "HD ready" on current TV's. Many of the TV's are not in fact ready it seems. Just a sales gimmick.
     
  3. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Maybe this is why the companies are back tracking now as they realise all these TV's being sold as HDMI and HD Ready are nothing of the sort, and not wanting a backlash, class action lawsuits and 1000's of refunds to issue have decided to allow full HD content via component leads instead.

    I know there is an argument over keeping the connection digital for better picture quality, but when I look at the two TFT monitors at work on my desk, from 60 cms away, each have 100% complete perfect pixel to pixel mapping at a resolution of 1280x1024, both looking exactly the same, yet one is connected by DVI (i.e. digital) and the other is connected by analogue VGA and I have long forgotten which is connected by which, then you realise that HDMI isn't going to give anything better in terms of picture quality, unless of course component connections are delibrately throttled back to a lower resolution, which now it looks like they will not.

    Regards

    Phil
     
  4. Mariner

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    Although I didn't read the article myself knowing the erm, quality, of Daily Mail reporting, I'd guess that they reported that 720p isn't 'proper' HD in comparison to 1080p. Not true, of course.

    Hmmm. I suppose it's possible that they were commenting on the fact that the HD ready televisions don't actually contain a HDTV tuner which is of course correct. Talking to one of my friends at the weekend, he didn't have any idea that a separate HD tuner would be required to use future high definition broadcasts with a 'HD ready' TV.

    That said, I still wouldn't wipe my arse with that paper. ;)
     
  5. DaveG_UK

    DaveG_UK
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    Over a year ago I got a Panny TX26LXD1 LCD TV. I'd done a lot of research before I bought it, so I knew exactly what I was getting. Which made me very curious as to why it was being called "Hi Def Ready" when it didn't even have a DVI (or VGA) input!

    I think a lot of sales/PR people who don't necessarily understand the technology are just looking at the resolution of the 'new' TV sets (e.g. the one I bought was 1280x768) and if it's high enough are calling it "Hi Def". Which in old-fashioned terms it is, the screen has a lot of "definition". Although this makes nothing of the fact that these screens never achieve their full resolution (DVD players, game consoles and freeview boxes don't go into the realms of 1280, correct me if I'm wrong), unless you plug them into a computer. Which in the case of the TV I have is never going to happen!
     
  6. ROYOLD

    ROYOLD
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    The article, in fact, was in the Sat. March 18 edition, so I was a week adrift.

    That was the arguement - that 99% of current TV's are only equipped for 921,600 pixels as against the 1080 lines with 1,920 pixels per line giving a total of 2,073,600 pixels. Currently only one set in the U.K. offers the latter which is the 37" Philips 37PF9830 which sells for £2,800. Sets from Sharp and others are currently becoming available.

    Usually the Mail gets thrown away unread. I only buy the one weekly newspaper and that is for the TV magazine. The one in the Mail is the best hence the Saturday purchase.
     
  7. cerebros

    cerebros
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    If you take a wander over the to Hi-Def forum here you'll find lots of discussion over the problems with the Daily Mail article, but basically it seems to boil down to the Mail publishing a load of tosh written by someone who either didn't understand that there are 2 main HDTV formats (720p and 1080i/p), or had fallen for Sony's "True HD" marketing which declares anything other than 1080p isn't truly HD.

    The fact is there are plenty of HD Ready sets available - ignore anything saying "HDTV Ready", "HDTV Compatible" etc - HD Ready is what you should be looking out for if you're buying a HD set in the EU.

    And personally I think HDMI is the way forward as not only does it allow you to keep everything digital as long as possible, once HDMI switching amps come down to the mass market receiver/amp range, we'll see an end to most of the spaghetti you get at the moment with having to hook components up to amplifiers and TV.
     
  8. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Keeping all digital certainly sounds good but analogue connections work fine, see my post in this thread where I compare analogue and DVI connections on monitors with both having perfect one to one pixel mapping, so how much better would HDMI be over analogue component?

    HDMI being digital was brought about for a couple of reasons:

    1) To encrypt the digital data to try and prevent piracy.
    2) For manufacturers to sell us new hardware, the new amps being a good example.

    As DVD/HD DVD/Blu-ray recorders have to have a digital to analogue convertor for analogue out as this is a must for almost everyone, and TV's have to an analogue to digital convertor to remain usable with most analogue sources, HDMI is always going to be an additional connection. If it just completely replaced all the analogue outs/ins in playback and TV equipment the stuff would be cheaper and simpler to manufacture, plus much less confusing for people using them, however that isn't going to happen anytime soon or at all.

    Before HDMI become the latest marketing must have it was component connections that would (and still will) carry high-definition, and there was never any concern component wasn't up to the job. With the trend now changing so that analogue is not down converted suddenly means all those people with HD TVs that only accept HD signals via component due to missing the HDMI connection, will now suddenly be able to have HD without buying a new TV!

    Yes I agree on paper and ideally digital is should be better, but when the hardware will continue to come with analogue circuits, and that these days analogue to digital conversions happen so well you can't notice a difference (example PC monitors via VGA or DVI), do we really need it?

    Regards

    Phil
     
  9. cerebros

    cerebros
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    In my opinion - yes. Regardless of whether there's any visible difference between component and signals sent over HDMI, I still prefer the idea of being able to use HDMI to minimise the number of cables required to hook everything up, once HDMI switching amps fall within my price range.
     

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