Looking to buy a NAS based on two scenarios

Bman

Active Member
Hi :)

I'm looking to get into the NAS business for my Music & movie library.
In my current setup, I have 4 external HDDs (varying from 8 to 12TB each) connected to a windows pc.

My main concern is with backing up my music HDD, so I'm guessing that a 2 bay NAS will suffice, but I'm also open to the idea of getting a 5 bay NAS and to populate the 3 spare bays with my 3 movie HDDs. My movies are mainly in 1080p and 4k mkv's & ISO files, so I need a NAS that can stream full UHD files 4K with ease.

I understand that the synology 5 bay nas diskstation ds1019+ is a good fit for this job, although its from last year.
I also understand that there are options to mod my current HDDs and use them with the NAS, but it's not ideal and it's a real pain in the 🍑

So my question is do you think I should go with a 2 or 5 bay NAS and which one should I get for each scenario?
 

cjed

Well-known Member
My main concern is with backing up my music HDD, ...

Could you elaborate on this a bit ? Why not just get another external HDD to use as the backup ?
Also bear in mind that adding existing HDDs to a NAS will usually wipe them, so if you intend using your existing HDDs in a NAS you'll need additional storage to copy your content to before adding your HDDs to the NAS.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
It depends on what you want, you can buy DAS (RAID 1 mirror) for USB drives, see My Book Duo for example but if you want to decouple the PC but retain access to the media than the NAS is the way to go.

If all you really care about is the music then just get the cheapest 2 bay.

If you want the NAS to take over movie streaming duties too then get the 5 bay.

The NAS will wipe the drives beforehand and with 8-12TB HDD's thats a lot of data to move around. You might want to buy 2 new HDD's at least for the NAS to give you room to maneuver.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
You want 2 bays for music, 1 for the music and the other for backup.

RAID isn't backup. It's redundancy. If your NAS fails, if it gets stolen, fire, flood... where's your backup?
Right next to your primary copy, that's not backup.

If you want backup then keep an external drive for backup.

Then you want 3 drives for your movies, so you're looking for a 5 bay?

What about new movies, data etc. You need more than 5 bays as your library expands.
 

Bman

Active Member
You want 2 bays for music, 1 for the music and the other for backup.

RAID isn't backup. It's redundancy. If your NAS fails, if it gets stolen, fire, flood... where's your backup?
Right next to your primary copy, that's not backup.

If you want backup then keep an external drive for backup.

Then you want 3 drives for your movies, so you're looking for a 5 bay?

What about new movies, data etc. You need more than 5 bays as your library expands.
I'm looking at all possibilities and their advantages/disadvantages.
My reasoning for a 5 bay NAS is that 2 are for music (One of these is a backup copy) and 3 bays to stream movies. I don't intend to expend them in the near future but I understand that there's an option to add another bay to an existing one.

I'm open to all options 'cause I'm not well versed in that area.

Maybe a NAS is indeed a waste of time/money and my current setup is good enough. I just don't know.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
(One of these is a backup copy)

It's not a backup. It's a copy on the same device.

If you delete something accidentally it's gone from both copies.
If your NAS fails. It's gone (until you get another NAS or you can work out how to get the files off the HDD)
If your NAS is stolen or damaged, both the copies are in the same device.

That's not backup.

You have 3 drives with movies on them?

You won't buy any more movies?
You won't need anymore storage space for new movies?

That's what I'm getting at. If you need a 5 bay just now, then you need more than 5 bays to allow for expansion, unless your drives are small and you buy larger drives to fill the NAS, which yours are not.

Note that you can't just stick your drives in the NAS and it will all work. The first thing the NAS will do when you insert a disk is wipe it. So you need some new drives to populate the NAS and start copying things over.

Also, depending upon the NAS, if you're using any form of RAID then if you stick mixed sizes of drives in it, then they'll all only be seen as the smallest size and the rest is gone to waste.

I think you really need to do a bit of homework before you commit to buying a larger size NAS,
 
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Bman

Active Member
Thanks, @Sloppy Bob
It looks like it's a bit too much for me right now.
I think that for now, I'll go with your advice and just buy another external HDD to backup my music drive.
 

PLCMAN5580

Standard Member
I have a SYNOLOGY 8 Bay NAS and am currently using five bays. The NAS will allow me to have a single drive failure and continue to operate while the system repairs itself. I can also add additional drives to increase the space.

If you consider a NAS, factor in your future expansion. Purchasing a NAS with expansion capabilities will pay off in the future. I have all my music , videos and other documents stored on the NAS. Most NAS's can be configured with multiple RAID configurations. Choose the the configuration that best fits your needs.

As other have indicated a NAS is not a replacement for a good backup and I make backup of all of my files on regular basis to external drives

FYI, I progressed from 2 Bay Netgear to a 5 Bay Synology and then to the current 8 Bay. In all cases the move was made due to increased storage requirements.
 

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