Looking for new 55'" TV

tamulionis

Novice Member
Hi, I have 5 year old SONY KDL-40W605B and want to replace it with something bigger. I'm looking at Philips 55PUS7304, Hisense 55U8B, Hisense 55B7500. Mainly it will be used for gaming on PS4 and watching TV shows/movies.
Any suggestions?
 
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mdrav

Novice Member
I'm in the same position and used for the same reasons as well as sports. The LG C9 is on my current shortlist along with the Sony AG9 and the Samsung Q90.

I'm quite concerned about burn-in with OLED so right now leaning towards the Q90. I think it's a crazy world when you have to worry or be careful with the way you watch TV because of burn-in risk after potentially spending the best part of 2 grand on a TV. At least you don't get that risk with QLED.

Can anyone advise on the above? Is burn-in a real danger or is it all exaggerated? The fact they don't offer burn-in warranty does send alarm bells ringing in my head. A salesman in Currys was telling me the static images on the AG9 are on every day for hours on end with no burn-in but he is a salesman.... I do play a lot of PS4 including FIFA and that's supposed to be a game that has caused burn-in issues on OLED TVs previously.

I've always been a Samsung fan and like what I've read about the Q90 although I know the picture can never match the other two OLED.

Regarding the C9 and AG9 I would lean towards the latter if I did risk going OLED because of the superior processor in the Sony but not sure I could justify the price gap either.
 

Leo31291

Well-known Member
Might vary panel by panel but I game for long sessions on my old and no issues.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
I'm in the same position and used for the same reasons as well as sports. The LG C9 is on my current shortlist along with the Sony AG9 and the Samsung Q90.

I'm quite concerned about burn-in with OLED so right now leaning towards the Q90. I think it's a crazy world when you have to worry or be careful with the way you watch TV because of burn-in risk after potentially spending the best part of 2 grand on a TV. At least you don't get that risk with QLED.

Can anyone advise on the above? Is burn-in a real danger or is it all exaggerated? The fact they don't offer burn-in warranty does send alarm bells ringing in my head. A salesman in Currys was telling me the static images on the AG9 are on every day for hours on end with no burn-in but he is a salesman.... I do play a lot of PS4 including FIFA and that's supposed to be a game that has caused burn-in issues on OLED TVs previously.

I've always been a Samsung fan and like what I've read about the Q90 although I know the picture can never match the other two OLED.

Regarding the C9 and AG9 I would lean towards the latter if I did risk going OLED because of the superior processor in the Sony but not sure I could justify the price gap either.
Hi, I have 5 year old SONY KDL-40W605B and want to replace it with something bigger. I'm looking at Philips 55PUS7304, Hisense 55U8B, Hisense 55B7500. Mainly it will be used for gaming on PS4 and watching TV shows/movies.
Any suggestions?
Hisense U8B will give you the best overall TV if you want a TV that can get a bit brighter with HDR and has better motion controls.

Otherwise the B7500 or even U7B is your best bet.

The Philips probably isn't great value and will be using a questionable panel type at 55".

The alternatives would Samsung RU8000, or perhaps the Panasonic GX800 although the Panasonic's motion is not fantastic for an expensive TV.
 

jpr141

Well-known Member
Funny old game this burn-in lark.

I agree with the poster about having to worry about how you watch TV. I think it might do some people's head in. I mean on a weekend or whenever, do people suddenly think oh no the TV has been on 4hrs straight I better turn it off for a bit. Do you OLED owners think a lot about these things?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Funny old game this burn-in lark.

I agree with the poster about having to worry about how you watch TV. I think it might do some people's head in. I mean on a weekend or whenever, do people suddenly think oh no the TV has been on 4hrs straight I better turn it off for a bit. Do you OLED owners think a lot about these things?
Its not a new phenomenon though, its the nature of self emissive display technology. Was the same with Plasma TVs and is the same with OLED phones.

If you don't want to think about how you use the TV, then its just not a technology for you and you still have option to buy LCDs today.
 

jpr141

Well-known Member
Its not a new phenomenon though, its the nature of self emissive display technology. Was the same with Plasma TVs and is the same with OLED phones.

If you don't want to think about how you use the TV, then its just not a technology for you and you still have option to buy LCDs today.
So what what happen if someone literally has an OLED on all day into the evening watching various content, and they haven't turned it off once that day?

Will it be wrecked by the end of the night. Riddled with image retention?
 

martin 39

Active Member
I've used my Panasonic oled for 10 months now just use it like a normal TV . If were home its on .like my two previous plasmas no problems as yet . More hype than reality I believe
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
So what what happen if someone literally has an OLED on all day into the evening watching various content, and they haven't turned it off once that day?

Will it be wrecked by the end of the night. Riddled with image retention?
It depends what they watch, if they are looking to keep the TV on all day you expect the life expectancy of the TV to dwindle compared to someone who uses it half as much, and because compensation cycles are performed when the TV is placed in standby then it greatly reduces the chance of any burn if there has been some image retention.

If there is no image retention though, and the content is mixed, its likely they will never encounter burn in.

Its just generally recommended to power off the TV after a few hours so it can perform those cycles, its not a big deal when you can automatically set up a sleep timer on all TVs anyway.

If that is a problem, and you for whatever reason don't want to put the TV in standby, or don't want to think about it, then don't get an OLED.

But people forget, LCD TVs can have burn in too, they are just less likely to get it. If someone uses the TV enough with the same static content it can get burn in, ever seen LCDs with burn in, in pubs?

Anyway, my point is every electronic equipment has a way it can fail, LCD TVs will gradually lose brightness over time, the same as OLED/Plasma pixels do. The power consumption of higher end LCDs can also be a lot higher than OLEDs if using HDR as they get very bright, which will only make for more heat and for the TVs power supply to fail sooner.

So all the talk of OLED burn in and we have already seen this kind of discussion before in the Plasma era. Its not really changed, some people back then didn't buy Plasma TVs because of the risk just the same as people now will not buy OLED.

That doesn't mean though that their TVs lasted longer, they could have had a failure with the backlights or screen uniformity issues which are more common in LCDs.
 

jpr141

Well-known Member
It depends what they watch, if they are looking to keep the TV on all day you expect the life expectancy of the TV to dwindle compared to someone who uses it half as much, and because compensation cycles are performed when the TV is placed in standby then it greatly reduces the chance of any burn if there has been some image retention.

If there is no image retention though, and the content is mixed, its likely they will never encounter burn in.

Its just generally recommended to power off the TV after a few hours so it can perform those cycles, its not a big deal when you can automatically set up a sleep timer on all TVs anyway.

If that is a problem, and you for whatever reason don't want to put the TV in standby, or don't want to think about it, then don't get an OLED.

But people forget, LCD TVs can have burn in too, they are just less likely to get it. If someone uses the TV enough with the same static content it can get burn in, ever seen LCDs with burn in, in pubs?

Anyway, my point is every electronic equipment has a way it can fail, LCD TVs will gradually lose brightness over time, the same as OLED/Plasma pixels do. The power consumption of higher end LCDs can also be a lot higher than OLEDs if using HDR as they get very bright, which will only make for more heat and for the TVs power supply to fail sooner.

So all the talk of OLED burn in and we have already seen this kind of discussion before in the Plasma era. Its not really changed, some people back then didn't buy Plasma TVs because of the risk just the same as people now will not buy OLED.

That doesn't mean though that their TVs lasted longer, they could have had a failure with the backlights or screen uniformity issues which are more common in LCDs.
Obviously there are some households where someone or other will be at home all day for at least some days. My household is like that. People working from home, disabled people etc will obviously be at home more than the average. If these people do put their OLED TVs into standby once every four hours or so for a while, and do also watch various content. Would you recommended an OLED?

I'd be intrigued to know if any of the OLED owners on here are in a similar situation to those I've mentioned. Be interesting to know how they get on.
 
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