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Looking for good geometry... is it out there?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by warryor, Nov 1, 2001.

  1. warryor

    warryor
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    Hello people,

    I've tried 4 different TV sets this year, and only one has had good geometry;
    1 Panasonic 32TK20: (bad bowing on the right)
    3 Sony 32FX60 (2 bad bowing top/bottom, 1 large "dip" on right)
    1 Philips 29PT5515 (29" 4:3) Very excellent geometry, but very irritating "sync lines" or whatever in 16:9 mode.

    Now I have a Philips 28PW8506, which has a sloping picture (quite apparent, since I often use subtitling on both DVD and of course regular broadcasts (I live in Sweden))
    The picture also "dips" on the left side of the tube, which pronounces the problem even more, so the sync lines are visible even on this widescreen set.

    Now, I want a TV with reasonable geometry, and best posible picture for about £600. 50Hz ok if the picture is not obviously stripy (the 29PT5515 had GREAT sharpness and very little flicker for £450).

    Please help, I just want a normal TV ..... any ideas?
    All help is greatly appreciated.

    /Ze Warryor
     
  2. warryor

    warryor
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    Well, 5 sets actually.... but I'm sure you got that. =)
    If only the 8506 had a rotation adjustyment, but I was s**t out of luck even when getting into the service menu, as the rotation setting does nothing. =(
     
  3. LV426

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    The only "guarantee" of good geometry can be had from devices based on flat panel technologies - direct view Plasma or LCD, or LCD projection. These devices intrisically can't suffer from pin or barrel effects. Direct view ones can't suffer from image tilt or convergence errors either. LCDs can't suffer from "bounce". But they can all suffer from inaccurate width and position settings, usually correctable via a menu.

    Direct view and RP CRT TVs are intrinsically difficult to get right. In these days of everything being built down to a price (rather than up to a standard) there just isn't time in the factories to get them right, and in many cases, the menu adjustments won't fully correct problems or wide tolerances in the physical assembly. And only the very best (read, expensive) TVs (eg Loewe) get even close to solving voltage regulation "bounce".

    But, for colour rendition and contrast, CRTs have still yet to be equalled by other technologies. You pays your money and......
     
  4. Paul G

    Paul G
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    If only large screen crt's had geometry that's as good as a computer monitor.

    If only!....
     
  5. warryor

    warryor
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    Yep, but monitors are not very large.... =)
    My 19" Samsung, which is very good, has a slight bowing, but so slight you never can tell unless you stare at the lower edge real close (so, not of interest at all)

    Well, it's true, I came to the conclusion that I need to spend like £1300 to get something "perfect", but I'll get the 8806 replaced until a get one that's good enough. (it's not a bad set for the price)
     
  6. warryor

    warryor
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    Bah, after a couple of days I've seen that the set introduces quite noticable noise no matter what's connected. Also the RGB input/handling is bad on this set, a lot of bleeding, I needed to switch to S-Video (can live with that), but this noise is... just too much.
    (strangely enough both my 8 year old 270GBP Philips and my friends equally simple 10 year old Toshiba set can manage to not do that, and pass the PLUGE test. amazing what TV:s have developed over the years)

    So, I'll give it a shot again ;), perhaps someone can give a recommendation, this is what I'm looking for at max 600GBP:

    28" widescreen
    1 RGB scart
    1 S-Video connection
    1 composite connection
    Reasonable geometry (less than 1cm top/bottom bowing, certainly not 1 inch or thereabout)
    Limited noise on RGB and S-Video (like no crosstalk from antenna or wherever it comes from)
    100Hz if can be fit in the price, or 50Hz without annoying flicker (if you've seen a Philips 29PT5515 you know what I mean, an good implementation)
     
  7. Ian J

    Ian J
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    Warryor,

    have a look at the JVC AV28WFT which meets all of your criteria and is available for less than your target price.

    I have the 32" version which is a good set but does suffer from geometry problems in 4:3 mode

    I think that the only sets with perfect geometry are those expertly set up at the factory to be sent to the magazines for testing, or am I just being cynical.

    Regards

    Ian
     
  8. warryor

    warryor
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    Woohoo! (dare I get my hopes up?)

    This could be my "lucky day". The vendor who I bought the Philips 8506 from actually lists the AV28WFT, at roughly £570 (that is including the nice 25% VAT we have here).

    Actually, for the record, I'm primarily interested in vertical geometry, as this is what's irritating when watching widescreen material (I rarely use the real 4:3 mode on widescreen sets, unless the material really requires it). Of course, the 1 inch (no exaggeration) bowing I had on the right side of the Panasonic 32DK20 was nothing to laugh about, it made the 4:3 mode "useless".
    If only I could audition the TV at the store..... got to fix that somehow, we're all tired of transporting these bigass sets.

    Thanks for the tip, Ian!
     
  9. LV426

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    AFAIK, JVC TVs have a service menu in which you can make a number of adjustments to geometry. Depending on exactly WHAT is wrong with it, you may be able to tweak it out. My 24WT2 suffered from sever pincushioning on NTSC material. After a couple of hours' work, it's much better now. However, all but the most esoteric (read, expensive) TVs will have cheap power supplies that make the picture shape change slightly with brightness. So, you can set the geometry up fine for a darkish iumage, but it will begin to bend as the picture gets brighter. Short of turning brightness/contrast down, you can't fix this problem.
     
  10. warryor

    warryor
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    Yep, I know the deal with the power supplies. That I can take easily, doesn't matter much, as long as it doesn't change the geometry along the vertical lines much, and I haven't seen anything that bothers me on any set regarding that.

    (The thing is that there is (almost) always picture information on the left/right edges, so you can expand the picture and get rid of the worst nastiness (if any). But not so vertically, with 1.85:1, 2.35:1, etc, where you always have high contrast areas (the black bars, of course).)

    Btw, I found an access method to some JVC sets here:
    http://members.accessus.net/~090/awh/how2adj.html#5.11
    Might be of interest......
     

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