Looking for a Wifi Router / Access Point that can use channels 100+ (Band B/C) on 5GHz

VykkuF

Active Member
I am looking for an access point or router (that will run in access point mode) that can use other channels than just the band A (channels 36-64). Looking to use it exclusively for an Oculus Quest 2, and in my home band A is completely overloaded, while the bands B and C are completely free.

Bought two different TP-link routers so far and both only allow 36 to 64 unfortunately. The stock Virgin Media router does allow channels 100-116, and that does improve the streaming performance a lot, but I can't move it around and it is a bit too far for some rooms.

Ideally as cheap as possible, as it is only going to be used by a single device within about 1-2 meters away with no obstructions, so I don't really need any fancy features other than supporting band B/C
 

VykkuF

Active Member
You want to check country settings, higher end 5 GHz channels vary by country.
Both band B and C are legal in UK, its just that TP-Link (unsure for others) seems to not include support for them at all in UK. Neither of the two TP-Link routers had country settings.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
A lot of cheaper stuff avoids the higher channels to save on implementing "DFS." Briefly, some of the channels are used by RADAR and the rules say that if any RADAR is detects, the Wi-Fi channel has to shunt down and shunt to something else. (Some clients are not particularly good at coping with this and it leads to one of the "dropped the signal" causes.)

I used to work at a University on the flight paths into Heathrow airport and lots of our AP's would go nuts when EGLL was on westerly ops.

There's plenty of kit that does offer the higher (and DFS) channels - but you do have to shop for it. I suggest that if it's not explicitly stated in the datasheets, presume absence.
 

leasty

Active Member
I've got an Asus DSL-AC68U that I run as an AP and that supports channels 100-116 and 132-140 on the current (latest) firmware level.
I would presume that the rest of the Asus range are likely to support those channels as well, as the AC68U is in the lower part of the Asus range. So would be worth checking out the rest of the Asus devices.
 

VykkuF

Active Member
I've got an Asus DSL-AC68U that I run as an AP and that supports channels 100-116 and 132-140 on the current (latest) firmware level.
I would presume that the rest of the Asus range are likely to support those channels as well, as the AC68U is in the lower part of the Asus range. So would be worth checking out the rest of the Asus devices.
Thanks, that's very much appreciated

A lot of cheaper stuff avoids the higher channels to save on implementing "DFS." Briefly, some of the channels are used by RADAR and the rules say that if any RADAR is detects, the Wi-Fi channel has to shunt down and shunt to something else. (Some clients are not particularly good at coping with this and it leads to one of the "dropped the signal" causes.)

I used to work at a University on the flight paths into Heathrow airport and lots of our AP's would go nuts when EGLL was on westerly ops.

There's plenty of kit that does offer the higher (and DFS) channels - but you do have to shop for it. I suggest that if it's not explicitly stated in the datasheets, presume absence.
The annoying thing is that pretty much none of the consumer routers i've checked mention DFS or the channels they support in the documentation, even the Asus ones that definitely support them
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I've got an Asus DSL-AC68U that I run as an AP and that supports channels 100-116 and 132-140 on the current (latest) firmware level.
I would presume that the rest of the Asus range are likely to support those channels as well, as the AC68U is in the lower part of the Asus range. So would be worth checking out the rest of the Asus devices.

I would never "presume" anything about IT equipment and presume absence until there is evidence of presence. If it's important and it's not explicitly stated in the datasheets, check with the vendor.
 

leasty

Active Member
I would never "assume" anything in IT, having had a 35 year career in various IT roles. As I said I "presume" it might have, based on experience, but check out the range of Asus devices. I have used various TP-Link and Netgear devices none of which supported the high 5Ghz channels, but that may have changed with their newer devices or firmware levels.
Seems a bit limiting of consumer networking equipment that contain WAP's not to support the high channels when most consumer phones, tablets etc do support them.
 

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