1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Longevity of DVD Media

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Slimline, Apr 25, 2005.

  1. Slimline

    Slimline
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi everybody. I've searched the forum (and many others) and trawled through yards of DVD media threads discussing the relative virtues of different brands and dyes.

    I have an NEC 2150 8x recorder and haven't really ever had a coaster - I don't think they're all that common any more. I'd be happy with any of a number of dyes. What I'm really concerned about are reports that some people have burned DVDs that worked just fine initially, but which stopped working months or even years down the line. This is a pretty alarming prospect, especially if the original data (home movies in my case) will be long gone by then.

    Does anybody have any experience or knowledge of what to avoid in this field? Have you come across any impartial studies of the effect of aging on recordable media? One guy claimed that his grade A Ritek G04 discs suffered this fate!

    Any help or advice appreciated.
     
  2. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,204
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,261
    DVDR media is not a particularly reliable mid to long term storage medium. Your best bet is not to look for the 'perfect' DVDR media - instead concentrate on making multiple backups on different types of media. Have a look at this article on the subject.

    Personally I have had discs fail within weeks of being burnt (Mirror for example) and have had a number of big brand discs (e.g. Verbatim) fail within several months. My personal current DVD backup strategy is to make:
    2 x DVD-R copies on different makes of discs
    1 x DVD+R copy
    1 x DVD-RAM copy on Panasonic/Maxell brand discs
    1 x Scratchproof DVD-R for 'daily' use
    ...and then every 18-24 months I make two more copies on DVD-R/DVD+R. I ensure all my discs are branded from major disc producers whose production standards I trust: Pioneer (no longer producing their own discs :( ), Panasonic, Maxell, TDK, Verbatim etc. Using this strategy I am yet to loose any data.
     
  3. Jules

    Jules
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2000
    Messages:
    5,074
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Ratings:
    +752
    All my discs burned from 2+ years ago (including cheap bulkpaq discs) still play fine.
    I'm not sure the average Joe would have the time, the organisation or the inclination to carry out such an extensive backup routine.

    I even read somewhere that the failure of DVD-R's over time if stored properly is a bit of myth. Air would have to get inside the disc which isn't going to happen.
    Look after them, use a decent burner / player and you'll be ok.

    I think the more likely cause of problems would be that the original burns might be sub-standard (perhaps a hardware issue) and the drive mechanism on the DVD player reading the disc is wearing out.

    Its might be prudent to do multiple burns but, but my Pioneer 106/108 drives on my PC make excellent burns to almost any media and I don't find it at all necessary.
     
  4. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,204
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,261
    Yes - so do many of mine. Infact I still have working DVD-Rs that are somewhat older than that. But it doesn't alter the fact that a significant proportion of discs have failed. These are discs that have been stored in a variety of conditions - including my vault - a room designed specifically for optical media storage and which is subject to climate control.

    And all my discs are carefully handled - in fact several of those that failed were only ever played in once or twice and for the rest of the time were sfaely encased in their cases out of sunlight and away from excess temperatures etc. I would advise everyone to instigate a similar backup policy to that I follow - if people choose not to, or they simply disregard the risk as a 'myth', then that is their choice. But don't say the risk was never explained if/when it happens to you!
     
  5. Paul Cooksley

    Paul Cooksley
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Messages:
    1,428
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Ratings:
    +136
    Obviously what Rasczak says makes perfect sense.

    I have some recordings coming up which will be absolutely priceless for me - my family and I are appearing in a major BBC3 documentary series for 6 days and, as it's unlikely to be repeated I need to make sure that I get good quality DVD recordings of this that will definately last.

    I know this sounds like utter madness, but I am thinking of transferring DVD copies to VHS cassette...Why??? Well, although I haven't had too many problems with DVD recordings, I am still a little wary of the whole media and can't help but sometimes look back on VHS video cassettes recorded some 24 years ago that I still have which play back perfectly - ok - picture quality isn't that brilliant compared to DVD of course. But my way of thinking is that VHS cassette (whilst not giving such a brilliant DVD quality picture) would be a medium for me to save my pricess recordings should discs fail. Yes, I will make 2 x copies on discs (in fact the show is repeated on BBC3 every night, so I can get another broadcast style copy anyway) but I wonder if anyone else shares my point of view re: absolute pricess recordings...

    Don't get me wrong - I know full well that VHS is a dying medium and that copies on cassette are not as good a picture etc etc.. but I just feel that tapes in general have lasted many many years whilst DVD recorders and recorded discs are a relatively new form of recording still, and the future as such of recordings is not really known....

    Paul
     
  6. Rasczak

    Rasczak
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2002
    Messages:
    21,204
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Argyll
    Ratings:
    +2,261
    I fully agree. I still have a large VHS archive of material that will never be released on DVD - even though I have transferred all of them to DVD as I know the tapes are reliable.
     
  7. Paul Cooksley

    Paul Cooksley
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2004
    Messages:
    1,428
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Ratings:
    +136
    ...pleased to know that you share my point of view, Rasczak... Many people think I am mad when I tell them that I'm putting copies of priceless recordings back to VHS....

    But the proof is that VHS of course (whilst dying out now a little of course) has lasted the test of time.... well about 24 years or so with me personally.

    I am going to make the dupes of my DVD recordings on good quality VHS cassettes on a decent Sony machine... that way I can just sit back and relax knowing that should the discs fail for any reason I have a *reasonably good* quality on a medium I know has (and should still) last...
     
  8. pjclark1

    pjclark1
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    4,411
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Thailand
    Ratings:
    +271
    I have had 50+ ritek G04 printables fail totally, after less than 1 year.
     
  9. Jules

    Jules
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2000
    Messages:
    5,074
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Ratings:
    +752
    That doesn't sound good. Were they from the same batch?
    What burner were you using?

    My brother has had problems with some discs after a while, but they were burned on an unknown DVD-RW drive in his PC.
    The same discs burned on my Pioneer 106 have been great. You can clearly see the difference between burns to the same disc in different drives.

    50 G04 failures sounds like something else could be the problem to me.
     
  10. Chris23

    Chris23
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Messages:
    274
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +7
    I agree that VHS has been a stable media & all my old tapes play well. The problem I foresee is that the hardware - VHS players- will become unavailable.

    It is one of the unspoken tragedies of out time that modern media is less stable that that used previously. Acid paper, electronic storage, modern photographic printing etc are all less stable than varieties previously used. I am not sure there is an easy answer. Everything is disposable now & that includes your data unless you are prepared to work at keeping it current.
     
  11. MartinImber

    MartinImber
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2001
    Messages:
    3,851
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    71
    Location:
    Worcester
    Ratings:
    +21
    My priceless stuff is either on DV (holiday videos) or on Beta - so DVD copies just give me an easy way to watch - worse case I can recapture.

    For Beta I do have THREE HiFi vcrs
     
  12. laser

    laser
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Messages:
    924
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Hartlepool
    Ratings:
    +28
    Burn your DVD's are lower speeds. This will ensure that a player has a better chance of reading a damaged DVD, possibly caused by dirt or scratches than one which is burnt at 8x.
     

Share This Page

Loading...