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listening position

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by redbean, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. redbean

    redbean
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    hi,

    it seems that my sweet spot for getting the full wallop from my subwoofer is about 25 ft from away. this is at the end of my room. my usual listening position is about 10 ft.

    knowing that the wavelength is pretty long, is there a way of listening at 10 ft and still feeling the full impact? at the moment i can turn it loud. but even then i could not get the same punch as from 25 ft and at lower volume.

    any advice will be appreciated.
     
  2. recruit

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    Redbean - Have you tried different positions for the sub? or are you limited to where you can locate it as you might have better results moveing it.
     
  3. Nimby

    Nimby
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    redbean

    If your sub is at one end of ther room and the loudest bass is at the opposite end of the room then there must be an acoustic pressure point at the far end. While your listening position may be in a null point.

    But it all rather depends on which frequency you think is responsible for the best bass. If the sub has a big hump in its frequency response curve at a particular frequency then that will be the sound you hear loudest and most often. This hump (if any) may be responsible for your perception of greatest slam.

    It might help to adjust the phase knob *if you have one*. But if you just have the simpler 0-180 phase switch on your sub then try changing that and see how that sounds from your listening position.

    Normally the loudest and smoothest bass is supposed to come from a subwoofer placed in a corner. If your sub isn't already in a corner then try it in whichever makes most sense. Then try it in another one to see if it's worse or better.

    It is always difficult to predict the effect of subwoofer placement. Just keep moving your sub about the room a few inches at a time and then sitting in your listening position and see what the effect is on film or music.

    You may find that eventually you have to have the subwoofer close-by your listening position to achieve maximum slam. Use a variety of program material to judge which is the best sub position. Using just one film or music track to test with may be just what the sub needs if it has a huge hump in the frequency response. It might also be the worst possible test material for your sub in your room if it produces a boom.

    It is always fun to walk down a room while playing deep bass test tones and hear how the sound gets much louder and quieter depending on where you are in the room. These positions will change completely with each frequency of test tone. Browse for <snapbug> for short downloadable tones. You can learn a great deal about your sub and your room's effects on its performance from these.

    Have a look at this website for ideas on how sound waves behave in different sized rooms. Enter your room size to see the likely results in your own room. This works best in "normal" rectangular rooms. With L-shaped rooms you can try entering your longest room dimensions.

    http://www.mcsquared.com/modecalc.htm

    Nimby
     
  4. redbean

    redbean
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    hi recruit and nimby,

    actually i have a floor to ceiling cabinet on one end of the wall. the sub is located in the centre bottom cabinet, and in betw the two speakers that are 10 ft apart.

    i am limited to move it too much, maybe 2-3 ft sideways or in and out of the cabinet.

    have tried mainly rock. the music only came alive and with much greater bass at the far end of the room. it is clean and solid, not boomy. actually i like the thud in the heart. i tried the volume at 11 o'clock and the room felt like collapsing. quite nice betw 9-10 o'clock. funny thing, i get better bass at lower volume than if i am at 10 ft away. it's easier on the ears too.

    i will try to shift it around a bit and see how it goes. hope i can get to listen at my normal position.

    thanks anyway.
     
  5. Nimby

    Nimby
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    You are not alone with this problem. The bass kick drum on rock music is much better half way down my 30 foot room and the really deep stuff is only clearly audible outside or in my workshop 20 yards away! :blush:

    None of these are very practical as comfy seating positions for listening to music. :D

    Nimby
     
  6. bob1

    bob1
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    My sub allways sounded better in the next room ,when you walked into the room it wasn't as good.
    With the new sub and bfd i don't get the same effect at all and the best place for bass is were i sit.I'm shure the bfd as a big part to play in this as i used to get a large peak in the corner oposite the sub, this as now gone.
    You are probably sat in a null ,i get very little bass in the center of the room ,i would look at moving the sub more than you would like if only to see if it cure's the problem.
     
  7. Nimby

    Nimby
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    You should remember that you can always move yourself (and the sofa or chair) to a better listening position. If it's actually possible within the constraints of an acceptable room layout.

    I'd play some bassy music then wander slowly round the room listening for a bass hotspot. Though there are no guarantees of complete success wherever you place your listening chair or the sub (or both). But at least it adds one more dimension of flexibility to a difficult room layout or a tightly controlled subwoofer position due to opening doors.

    Few have the luxury of an empty room to call their own.

    Nimby
     
  8. redbean

    redbean
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    hi,

    tried to shift the sub a little. just a little. not much room to play with. as expected, too little to make any dif.

    resigned to leave it where it is. got to juggle my position if i want the thump. i get better soundstage at the 10 ft listening position.

    played some of my old country cds. it seems there is much reduced bass in them. wondering whether it is normal, presuming they didn't want too much bass in the past during recording or due to technology.
     

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