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Linn Sekrit Bi-Amp impedance

Alex Lake

Member
I'll be installing some Linn Sekrit in-wall speakers shortly and can go bi-amped with a Denon 3312 driving. I know that most people would consider that a mismatch, and suggest that I buy a better amp, but I'd like to give this a go!

The speakers are notionally 4ohm impedance, but I presume that is for single input. If running in bi-amped mode, I would guess that the impedance might be doubled or halved. In the first case - happy days. In the second, 2 ohms might be a big ask for the Denon.

I could just wire them up (unmounted) and see how it sounds, but before I do, any ideas as to what I should expect?
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
4 ohm speaker are something of a problem when connected to an AV amp. An AV amp is already a bit short on current delivering capabilities. If you have the speakers, they are probably OK, but they wouldn't be first on my list.

Though one would expect very good things from Linn speakers.

As to bi-amping, are you running the in-wall speaker terminals to surface mount speaker terminals plates like this -

Keene Retail Ltd, Electronics making AV happen, Products and accessories for video, photography, home cinema and AV

If so, just put two PAIR of terminals and short them together for standard wiring, or separate them for Bi-Wiring, that way it is not hardwired into the wall.

We can only assume what the various section of the speaker are in terms of impedance, but when you break a speaker into sections like low, mid, high, each section becomes an independent speaker. So, if the overall speaker is a 4 ohms, then each section is a 4 ohm. And when you put the sections back into one speaker again, it is still 4 ohms.

You also need to give us precise model numbers so we know what we are dealing with.

Steve/bluewizard
 

Alex Lake

Member
Is seems that (as you suggest) moving from bi-amping to single-amping just results in tweeter and mid-range unit linked in parallel. I would have thought that in plain old DC "resistance" terms, it's impossible that two things, each with impedance of 4 ohms, would still be 4 ohms when wired in parallel. Maybe they could each be 8 ohms - which would make them easier for a non-ridiculously-expensive AV amp to drive. But in the crazy world of AC and impedance, my knowledge rapidly runs out of steam.

I guess the thing would be to ask Linn. Not sure that there is a model number as such.

The speaker housings are now in a wall of sorts (although the wall isn't finished, so the baffle is somewhat non-existent). Maybe I should see if I can try them out as they are to get a vague idea of if it'll struggle. What might a sensible test be? I presume we'd be talking about loud music here.
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
But they are not in parallel, they are separated by the Crossover Network.

The Mid and Tweeter only play high frequencies, and the woofer does not. The Woofer only plays low frequencies which the Mids and Tweeters do not. The low frequencies see only the woofer, and the higher frequencies only see the Mids and Tweeters.

At any given frequency away from the crossover points, only one driver is playing.

At the crossover points, two drivers might be playing but they are attenuated, some variable crossover impedance is eating part of the signal and keeping the impedance high.

The secret is in the crossover network.

Steve/bluewizard
 
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Alex Lake

Member
Ah yes, that makes sense. I still think (but will check) that they are wired in parallel*, but the differing frequency response effective separates them.

*by this I mean the input terminals, not the drivers themselves
 

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