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lighting and digital cameras

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by davepop, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. davepop

    davepop
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    How do digital cameras perform in low light. Like early evening when the sun is down low in the sky, or indoors (concerts, some sporting events, etc), with no flash.
    I know I could use a slower shutter speed, but I don't want to use a tripod, and some of the action may be quite quick.

    For a film camera I can increase the film speed (400, 800+) to get around this problem.

    I am thinking of getting a Cannon A-80.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. m@rk

    m@rk
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    On the Canons (and others) there is an ISO setting (up to 1600) under the manual settings BUT you may find that the photos become quite grainy if you do this.

    Always better to use a tripod with slow shutter speed and low ISO but as you say, this is not always practical.
     
  3. seany

    seany
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    Well i have the canon ixus 400. It will have many of the same features. Mine and the A80 have a max iso of 400. Without the flash you're going to find it hard not to have noise in your pics.

    One of the reasons

    "A CCD is an analogue device, this means it outputs a certain voltage (normally VERY small) for a certain amount of light which is subsequently digitised by the analogue to digital converter, when you increase the sensitivity you're really just turning up the amplification of this signal (like the volume control on a stereo amplifier), the trade off is that you also amplify the "dark current" (noise) and so higher ISO images from digital cameras often exhibit noise."
     

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