Lightening

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Hercules51

Guest
Dont worry Steve, I dont intend to ask for another mini competition. :nono:

But has anyone taken a photograph of a forked lightening strike?

Lets see them :smashin:
 
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Alan D

Guest
Sorry to be pedantic - but the electric stuff that comes from clouds is "lightning" - there is no "e" in it. "Lightening" means making something lighter or to lighten.
 

stevegreen

Well-known Member
Alan D said:
Sorry to be pedantic - but the electric stuff that comes from clouds is "lightning" - there is no "e" in it. "Lightening" means making something lighter or to lighten.
I like the apology and the ..........but :laugh:

I have never even considered trying to photograph lightning to be honest. I would guess it either takes a very quick finger or a tripod and a long exposure. I only have one of the three and I don't think I could hold the camera steady enough for a long exposure.

Be interesting to see what people have managed though, good idea :smashin:
 

T0MAT01

Well-known Member
Is it safe to take a photo of lightning?

Especially on a long exposure, I wouldn't think it's that much different from taking one of the sun. Although dull stuff in the distance probably can't hurt.
 

kenlynch

Standard Member
Of course it's safe to take pics of lightning, barring being struck by it that is.

You ideally need a camera with a bulb option, this keeps the shutter open whilst the shutter button is pressed. You also need a tripod and a cable release so you don't knock the camera whilst the shutter is open.

Focus manually on the hyperfocal distance so you don't have to worry about auto focus. Set the aperture manually as well, about f8 should be fine. Set the camera to a low ISO like 100 to minimise noise.

Point the camera at an area where the storm activity is and press the shutter and take a few test shots to see how long you can keep the shutter open before overexposing (If it is really dark, like at night, then you probably don't need to worry about overexposure). Then simply press the shutter wait for lightning to strike in your frame and then release or leave open for multiple strikes. If lightning doesn't strike in the frame before the time given by your test exposure then just release and start again.

It is essentially a case of trial and error and patience.
 

kevandalice

Active Member
if you cast your mind back to july, remember the storms over the south coast around poole area?

the same pic was used in all the papers and it shows a large lightning strike over studland bay. also in the picture was a fairly large boat. the blurred effect of the boat gave away that a long exposure is used until lightning strikes
 
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Hercules51

Guest
I always thought that lightning photos were generally still shots from video film somehow. But now I can see how an open exposure shot may work.

If no one has tried succesfully to do this themselves, how about other extreme weather conditions :cool:

This isnt one of mine, but take a look at this
 

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Iain Shields

Active Member

Chris Muriel

Well-known Member
Hercules51 said:
I always thought that lightning photos were generally still shots from video film somehow. But now I can see how an open exposure shot may work.

If no one has tried succesfully to do this themselves, how about other extreme weather conditions :cool:

This isnt one of mine, but take a look at this
Where and when was that shot taken ?

Only thing I ever saw like that was an ice storm in New England about 8 years ago ; I was north of Boston myself where we were just clear of it. Vermont (next door state) got it really badly.

Chris Muriel, Manchester
 
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Hercules51

Guest
The tag on the photo says Geneva, So I guess it was next to the lake, but I dont know when. Like I said, the photo isnt mine, it was circulated to me by email some months ago.

I seem to remember we had a freezing rain storm in the west country some years back, when my car got iced like this but not nearly as bad.

Heres a wider angle shot that came with it :hiya:
 

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Overlord69

Active Member
Hercules51 said:
The tag on the photo says Geneva, So I guess it was next to the lake, but I don't know when. Like I said, the photo isn't mine, it was circulated to me by email some months ago.

I seem to remember we had a freezing rain storm in the west country some years back, when my car got iced like this but not nearly as bad.

Heres a wider angle shot that came with it :hiya:
Here's the full set. ;)
 

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Hercules51

Guest
Thanks overlord :smashin:

I only had the 2nd 3rd 4th and 5th one wmailed to me.


There not your photos that have been ripped off by someone are they? :eek:
 

Overlord69

Active Member
Hercules51 said:
Thanks overlord :smashin:

I only had the 2nd 3rd 4th and 5th one were emailed to me.


There not your photos that have been ripped off by someone are they? :eek:
No, they were emailed to me by a mate in Canada :ca:
 
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Hercules51

Guest
It looks like something that might happen in canada, rather than europe :D
 

Overlord69

Active Member
I've got no idea where they of, I'll email him and see if he knows.

PS: I've found a couple more...
 

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Hercules51

Guest
I thought so :clap:

It was a bit different when I was there, the jet d'eau was still working and not frozen
 

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ctcrm

Standard Member
Alan D said:
Sorry to be pedantic - but the electric stuff that comes from clouds is "lightning" - there is no "e" in it. "Lightening" means making something lighter or to lighten.
actually lightning comes from the ground upwards to the clouds ! :hiya:
 
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Hercules51

Guest
Not sure you are right there.

Lightning is caused by highly charged particles in the atmosphere grounding themselves on conductors fixed to the ground which will usually be negative charge like the earth. Only positive electrons actually move :lesson:
 
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Hercules51

Guest
well I never!!!

Unfortunatelt its been about 20 years since I did A level physics (and failed :D )
 

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