LG Nano816NA or....

Mattw924

Novice Member
Evening all,

We've found ourselves in the market for a new TV pretty sharpish, Toshiba 40TL963 being replaced after many years of service.

Budget of £700, would have to be a very VERY good reason to exceed as it's already been bumped up twice!

Usage is probably pretty normal - Partner likes her documentaries & trash TV mainly streamed, I'd like something a bit better for movies (combo of Netflix & Bluray via PS4) and PS4. Future proofing for PS5 would be a bonus, but not essential and I understand unlikely at my pricepoint.

Smart features not all that fussed on, but would rather Google Assist than Alexa if it was a choice.

We're pretty set on 55", TV will be in the corner of a north facing room with a window next to it, we sit around 10ft away.

This set from LG has caught my eye, however through a reward scheme at work I can get a Samsung Q60T for £720 - is that worth a look in comparison to the LG? Any other recommendations or advice gratefully received.

Thanks, Matt
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
First step when choosing should be to determine: Which panel type should I choose for my TV?

Once you have a chosen panel type most suited to your conditions you can narrow down TVs.

Also consider: The best time to buy a TV since buying right now isn't a very good idea.

In your shoes I'd try and obtain a capable HDR TV rather than looking at models like that LG. The Hisense U8Q is looking to be a great option and is already £800 so finding it for £700 come Black Friday shouldn't be too unreasonable.

Hisense 55" TVs use VA type.
LG 55" TVs use IPS.
Samsung models use both types, unsure which you'll get before buying their TVs. Q60T is probably VA.
 
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Mattw924

Novice Member
Thanks for taking the time to reply.

Is there a method of determining how well a TV will process HDR, or is it simply a case of buying the highest spec TV possible?

Looking at your guide, VA is the one I think that would be the best given the bulk of our "serious" viewing is almost head on. Is there a particular way to work out if a screen is VA or IPS?

I'd like to wait until Black Friday, but it's required a little more urgently than 7 weeks unfortunately!

Q70T is available to me at £799, £200 less then elsewhere.. how does it stack up against the U8Q?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Determining the panel type of a TV. - but I'm pretty certain your Toshiba is IPS.

For an LCD TV HDR baseline specs are around 1000 nits peak brightness with HDR, good local dimming and a wide colour gamut. First and cheapest TVs to offer that at 55" are:

Hisense 55U8Q - Around 1500 nits peak brightness
Samsung Q80T - Around 1000
Sony XH9505 - Around 1500

Q70T gets bright, but lacks local dimming. If you want a Samsung you are best shopping for the Q80T, but really its the higher end Q90T that can get as bright as the cheaper Hisense.
 

Mattw924

Novice Member
The Toshiba was bought without any proper research done prior to buying, I couldn't tell you/confirm what panel it has without guessing.

Hisense looks incredible value for money compared to the other two, plus £742 from Currys with 7% off voucher makes it a big contender
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
The Hisense specs and value for money are good but I'd urge you to read the review on-site and have a look in the Hisense area of the forum as they're not without issues.

 

craig808

Active Member
[QUOTE="Dodgexander, post: 28473748,

In your shoes I'd try and obtain a capable HDR TV rather than looking at models like that LG.

[/QUOTE]

Hi

I'm going tv shopping today and just come across this post. I'm a hifi man really so pleased forgive my ignorance if I'm about to ask a silly question.

I was also looking at the LG which the op mentioned. You have advised that he should go with an HDR tv rather than the LG 55NANO816NA. But looking at the description it actually says HDR.

Am I missing something here?

Or do you just mean that it's not a very good tv?
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
Am I missing something here?
Yes.

All new TV's are HDR compatible.

Only upper mid range and above are HDR capable.

In order to actually get a benefit from HDR an LCD TV needs 2 things. Brightness from the LED backlight, ideally at least 1000 nits and Full Array Local Dimming (FALD). If it doesn't have both of those it's not going to show HDR, it's not going to give good contrast and it's pointless watching HDR material on it.

I would urge you before you go TV shopping and listen to the mountain of BS a lot of the sales staff will tell you that you put it off and read the links in Dodgexanders signature line


It's a lot of reading, but choosing a TV is a much, much more difficult decision now.

You were going to look at that LG.

Why? What about it made you think that was the TV for you?
Do you need wide viewing angles? If not and you want good HDR then it's a really, really poor choice.

Also, buying a TV now is a bad idea, they'll be getting decent-sized discounts in a few weeks for Black Friday which is the first time you should consider buying that years model TV.
 
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craig808

Active Member
Yes.

All new TV's are HDR compatible.

Only upper mid range and above are HDR capable.

In order to actually get a benefit from HDR an LCD TV needs 2 things. Brightness from the LED backlight, ideally at least 1000 nits and Full Array Local Dimming (FALD). If it doesn't have both of those it's not going to show HDR, it's not going to give good contrast and it's pointless watching HDR material on it.

I would urge you before you go TV shopping and listen to the mountain of BS a lot of the sales staff will tell you that you put it off and read the links in Dodgexanders signature line


It's a lot of reading, but choosing a TV is a much, much more difficult decision now.

You were going to look at that LG.

Why? What about it made you think that was the TV for you?
Do you need wide viewing angles? If not and you want good HDR then it's a really, really poor choice.

Also, buying a TV now is a bad idea, they'll be getting decent-sized discounts in a few weeks for Black Friday which is the first time you should consider buying that years model TV.
Thanks for your input.

In all honesty I hadn't looked in to anywhere near enough by all accounts. I'll read those articles which you've have mentioned.

There was no particular reason that I chose that LG model other than budget i suppose.

I did go to look at some tv's today and the salesman actually said something quite sensible.

"Why are you looking at that tv. Yes it's 65" but it's not the greatest picture. Step back, don't rush into anything and wait for a Black Friday deal on a 55" OLED tv for around a grand".

So based on that I left and went home.

I did have a quick look at OLED tv's on the way out. Very impressive.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
@craig808 to use a HiFi analogy a HDR badge on the TV is like a High Res badge on a Amp or AV Receiver. It means nothing unless the equipment is manufactured good enough to reproduce that signal to begin with.

But its already been explained well above, so hopefully know you have a good idea of what constitutes to a true HDR TV.
 

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