LG HDR Effect

Discussion in 'LG TVs Forum' started by Intamasica, Nov 3, 2017.


    1. Intamasica

      Intamasica
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      Hi,

      I just purchased an LG 492810V which says it had Active HDR with Dolby Vision.

      I took this to mean the TV has a HDR display, but once I set it all up the picture modes confused me...

      There’s a ‘HDR Effect’ picture mode with various settings, does this mean HDR won’t work unless you select this setting, or is this to try and mimic HDR on content that doesn’t usually support it?

      I bought my TV for the purpose of gaming and to take advantage of both 4K graphics and HDR supported games, and I was wondering if to take advantage of this HDR, would I need to have my TV in one of these HDR Effect settings or because the screen (I think) is HDR itself, I would see the benefits when just playing in gaming mode?

      I’ve seen that people have had an issue with LG TVs and their HDR being too dark, which I encountered with using the HDR effect settings while watching Netflix. Hopefully I’m wrong but is this all I hope to achieve, a viewing/playing experience where everything is too dark half the time?

      Thanks for any help.
       
      Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
    2. raymondo77

      raymondo77
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      The "HDR Effect" mode is there for standard dynamic range (SDR) content. It's LG's attempt at faking HDR and personally I don't use it.

      When the TV is fed HDR content it will automatically detect it and switch into the appropriate mode:

      • When HDR 10 is passed in it'll show a popup with something like "HDR" displayed and there will be specific display modes for that type of content.
      • When Dolby vision is passed in you'll see a popup with the Dolby logo and "Dolby Vision" displayed, and there will be specific picture modes for that type of content.
      • When HLG is passed in a popup will show with "HLG" as the text, and there will be - you get the idea.

      You will need to ensure that HDMI Ultra Deep Colour is enabled on and HDMI ports you'll be passing HDR content into, but otherwise it should "just work".
       
    3. Intamasica

      Intamasica
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      Thank you so much, you’ve somehow been more help than hours of internet scouring and instruction manuals combined.

      So I guess even though you don’t get much of a choice between which HDR is activated, what’s the difference between the 3 you mentioned?

      Now all that’s left to do is to fine tune my picture for gaming...
       
    4. raymondo77

      raymondo77
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      The TV will react to the content it's being sent, so if the content is Dolby Vision then it'll select Dolby Vision.

      This is a real oversimplification but:

      • HDR10 - the "base" HDR, this is what all UHD Blu-ray (with HDR) will support, and all Amazon UK content with HDR. It uses what's called "static" metadata. Games with HDR are generally in HDR10.

      • Dolby Vision - Some UHD Blu-ray discs have this, and most of the Netflix HDR content is also Dolby Vision (for TVs without Dolby Vision, HDR10 is displayed instead). It uses "dynamic" metadata and is great for displays which cannot go up to and above 1000 nits.

      • HLG - A standard developed by BBC and NHK, it'll be used for broadcast TV.

      I think there may be a more comprehensive guide to what the different types of HDR are (there's also HDR10+ which Samsung use but no use to LG owners), on the site somewhere but I think that about covers the basics.
       
    5. SunnyIntervals

      SunnyIntervals
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      Worth adding that when you are watching something in HDR (you'll see a pop up in the top right to confirm you are) you can then go to the settings and make changes to it. Many of the default settings you would normally turn off for non HDR viewing may be activated, so it's worth turning them off. Stuff like True Motion, etc. Some of the settings will be greyed out as they are fixed within that viewing mode.

      HDR looks great though, I think it makes more difference to a programme than 4k resolution does
       

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