LG CX (OLED65CX) 4K OLED TV Review & Comments

jmacc

Distinguished Member
Just had my B7 approved for replacement by John Lewis as it suffered from screen burn and a replacement screen is not available. There was no quibble about it and I have ordered a CX. The cost to change was just £200 as the B7 was discounted for the best part of three years use. I could have had the C9 but felt the 2020 set would possibly have better screen burn protection.

Where I am a little confused is the additional insurance for £140 which appears to be good value. My original warranty from September 2017 didn't mention screen burn. Later policies appear to have had that added. The unknown for me is whether they honoured the original policy or this was a one off exchange based on the bad publicity that has appeared in the press. I have home contents insurance including accidental damage, so the only reason to buy a new policy is to ensure another replacement should screen burn happen again. I'm assuming all standard policies now specifically exclude screen burn, hence the opportunity to buy additional insurance.

Model wise, I always felt our B6 had a better picture than the B7, but that may be down to screen burn. It will be interesting to compare the B6 to the C10.
I imagine it was purely down to luck getting a decent person when you called. some people have luck, others don't.
At least with the new £140 protection there will be no if's or but's if it was to happen again... also covers you for accidental damage as well :) a no brainer for 140.
 
im more than happy with my 65cx coming from a 65c6 the colours are more vibrant motion seems better, pairs nicely with the arc i wouldnt say its huge leap but its definitely impressive and hopefully now im future proofed for a while
 

rtidrtid

Standard Member
Has anyone actually used the Gallery Mode on the CX yet? I'm putting mine up on Monday, but curious to see how people have found it so far?
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Finally wall mounted 77 inch cx. I’m happy. I think visually I’m at end game for a while.

Might upgrade when a 77 inch Sony 77inch oled comes out next year of the year after if it’s reasonably priced. Otherwise will sit tight with the LG oled.

If the 88inch ever becomes consumer friendly in price tag might upgrade to that too.


It’s just a beautiful picture. I’m happy. Firmware updates will continually improve the tv for the next 12 months probably.

Once I get my arendal towers back I’m gonna be very content bunny
 

jmacc

Distinguished Member
im more than happy with my 65cx coming from a 65c6 the colours are more vibrant motion seems better, pairs nicely with the arc i wouldnt say its huge leap but its definitely impressive and hopefully now im future proofed for a while
Hi mate
Motion for everything, sdr, hdr etc ? just less juddery on panning scenes? tell me more lol
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Hi mate
Motion for everything, sdr, hdr etc ? just less juddery on panning scenes? tell me more lol

the oled judder is gonna be there at times. its the nature of the tech. no oled is going to give u plasma level motion IMO.

taking people's reviews of it are just full of bias. just go out there and see one for urself, whether at a store or a friends house. even buy the smaller panel just to see what its like and return it.
 

irvsax

Active Member
In the review it was mentioned about both professional and user calibration to get the second set of results. Is it possible to know what settings were dialled in to get those results?
 

jmacc

Distinguished Member
the oled judder is gonna be there at times. its the nature of the tech. no oled is going to give u plasma level motion IMO.

taking people's reviews of it are just full of bias. just go out there and see one for urself, whether at a store or a friends house. even buy the smaller panel just to see what its like and return it.
I've had more oleds than you've had hot meals, :rotfl::rotfl: both lg and sony.
I want his opinion on why he thinks the motion on his lg 2020 model is improved over his old 2016 oled.
I know very well what lg oled motion has been like from 2014 - 2019, Don't have a 2020 model yet so I'm interested in his opinion.
Also many if not all reviewers stating 2020 lg oleds have much improved motion, not talking about plasma, crt or whatever, talking older gen lg oled motion to new 2020 gen lg motion from a real forum user and not a reviewer. :lesson:
:love:
 

chrismuk

Active Member
@Phil Hinton FYI just tried the stranger things test out on my 65” C9 using Cinema home (user) mode and had the same floating blacks posterisation you mention in the CX review. Knocked the brightness down to 49 and it completely went away, so maybe an issue not unique to the CX?
 

Roohster

Distinguished Member
Anyone can give me an in dept calibration settings for my 65CX?
It's pointless using someone else's in depth calibration settings as every calibration is specifically for that panel.
 

irvsax

Active Member
It's pointless using someone else's in depth calibration settings as every calibration is specifically for that panel.
is it pointless? I get what you are saying of course but the calibration they did on this review using the settings would still be closer than not using those settings right?
 

Roohster

Distinguished Member
.... using the settings would still be closer than not using those settings right?
Not necessarily, no.

If a display has good "out of the box" settings you'd probably be better off sticking with those rather than using someone else's calibration.

The basics (Oled light, contrast, brightness etc) from a calibration could be a good starting point, but once you go more in depth it could actually make the image worse.

Once you get into the multi-point white balance settings there will be little tweaks made, likewise to the colour balance.

Let's say a TV has been calibrated and (for example) the reds raised during the white balance setting.

If you applied them to another panel which already had slightly raised reds it would look considerably worse.
 
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irvsax

Active Member
Not necessarily, no.

If a display has good "out of the box" settings you'd probably be better off sticking with those rather than using someone else's calibration.

The basics (Oled light, contrast, brightness etc) from a calibration could be a good starting point, but once you go more in depth it could actually make the image worse.

Once you get into the multi-point white balance settings there will be little tweaks made, likewise to the colour balance.

Let's say a TV has been calibrated and (for example) the reds raised during the white balance setting.

If you applied them to another panel which already had slightly raised reds it would look considerably worse.
Fair enough, I thought the panels were very uniform with OLED out the box and therefore the calibration would be ok, but what you are saying does make sense of course.

I would like to know what the difference is between the two types that they did on this review. Was the manual one just getting readings and dialling in the settings until the readings got as good as they can then?
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Fair enough, I thought the panels were very uniform with OLED out the box and therefore the calibration would be ok, but what you are saying does make sense of course.

I would like to know what the difference is between the two types that they did on this review. Was the manual one just getting readings and dialling in the settings until the readings got as good as they can then?
Roohster is correct that you shouldn't copy calibration settings from one TV to another. There are a number of reasons why that doesn't work, which he covers well.
As for best settings, the Filmmaker mode is accurate enough for most users with the OLED light set for your room so it is bright enough.
The manual vs. automated approach is just that. It still requires expensive calibration equipment no matter which method you use. In the review, I compared a manual calibration that I did with my equipment, and then the automated approach also using my equipment, but the steps are automated and quicker to perform. There was no difference in either approach, but both need to be performed using the correct equipment. I hope that clarifies the point.
 

irvsax

Active Member
Roohster is correct that you shouldn't copy calibration settings from one TV to another. There are a number of reasons why that doesn't work, which he covers well.
As for best settings, the Filmmaker mode is accurate enough for most users with the OLED light set for your room so it is bright enough.
The manual vs. automated approach is just that. It still requires expensive calibration equipment no matter which method you use. In the review, I compared a manual calibration that I did with my equipment, and then the automated approach also using my equipment, but the steps are automated and quicker to perform. There was no difference in either approach, but both need to be performed using the correct equipment. I hope that clarifies the point.
Thanks for the clarification, that does make sense. I thought maybe the manual stuff was something that could be replicated by others, but clearly that is not the case because of the variations in panels. It sounds like the filmmaker mode on these new sets is pretty close and will certainly do as a good starting point at very least. Thanks
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
Well it must have been at least 10-15 years ago. Time goes fast as you get older!

But, yes, the launch prices of LG OLED's have been getting cheaper every year.
Just a few years ago the 65” was £4,500 at launch. £500 more gets you the 77”. Moving in the right direction.
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
Methinks was more than a "few" years ago.
I remember getting my dad a 32” Sony crt circa 2000 that retailed for £1,700. I managed to get John Lewis to price match an online company for £1,250 getting their 5 year free guarantee inc. Soon after they only matched the prices of physical stores.
 

Rob20

Well-known Member
OLED will always be a premium price product.

You don't have to buy it, but it's a nice option to have.

Same as leather v cloth or vinyl seats in a car.
No one wants leather anymore; we’re all going vegan! Just ask Tesla. :laugh:
 
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Rob20

Well-known Member
1: Is the PS5 going to really hit 4k/120fps?I don't think so. Its going to be 1440p/120fps as the most attainable framerate and resolution with good upscaling.. which shock horror.. hdmi 2.0b does at present.

2: I get if people don't want to buy a 77'' OLED because they don't have the money and time isn't right for them.

3: I think we're playing a fool's game by trying to 'time' when to purchase future proof TVs. The best thing to do is buy a 77'' OLED when you need a 77'' OLED.

4: To put it simply, do you want to enjoy a 77'' OLED today or do you want to wait and save your cash? Both are good decisions (and the latter very sensible).
1: I agree that PS5 is unlikely to be powerful enough for 4K 120fps, but it’s nice to be future proof for those that don’t upgrade their tv annually.

2: Personally, I’m not prepared to spend more than £3,000 on any tv and would prefer to wait until the tech reaches a price point I’m happy to pay: paid £2,500 for my 50” Pioneer plasma almost 12yrs ago and £2,300 for my C8 2 yrs ago. These days I’ll always wait for the Black Friday sales for tech.

3: I’d argue that nobody ’needs’ a 77” tv as smaller TVs fundamentally do the same job; just on a smaller screen, (obviously). My parents only replaced their tv when it broke: that is my definition of ’need’. I have broken that mould seeing as my 12yr old LX5090 is still in use in the lounge, but after 10 yrs I thought the time was right to move to Oled, 4K and a larger 65” screen; all for £200 less than the aforementioned plasma. Also, I love having apps built in more than I thought I would.

4: The great thing about tech is that you know prices will decrease relative to performance and TVs are a great example of this. Set the amount of money are you prepared to spend on a tv and wait until a tv falls within. Just my personal opinion however.
 

cobhc2008

Active Member
@Phil Hinton I've seen another publication mention that the filmmaker mode on the 48CX gives a "soft and insipid picture" which I find hard to believe taking into account its intent. Any ideas why they might have come to this conclusion?
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
@Phil Hinton I've seen another publication mention that the filmmaker mode on the 48CX gives a "soft and insipid picture" which I find hard to believe taking into account its intent. Any ideas why they might have come to this conclusion?
Can't comment on another publications verdict. If it is a UK publication it is probably because most of them have no idea what an accurate image should look like and assume that their personal preference of vivid or standard mode is best as it is bright and punchy. Filmmaker is darker than most other presets, but that is because it is accurate and showing all detail without clipping and colours as they should look. You can use the OLED light to set the brightness for your room and still have accurate greyscale and colour. For HDR10 content Filmmaker is also available and remains the most accurate preset. Other modes look more appealing to the eye if you are flicking between all the options at once and it is easy to be mistaken into thinking brighter is better. It is certainly bluer. Sharpness hasn't been an issue on the two CX models I have tested so far.
 
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Scott_Mac

Distinguished Member
Is anyone who has one able to confirm whether eARC works with lossless playback via the webOS apps? eARC works great via external players routed through the TV, but none of the built in apps - Plex particularly for me, are able to pass lossless audio to an eARC enabled AVR.

It was a major frustration on the C9 as it was one of the primary reasons for purchase. I ended up having to buy an nVidia Shield which was frustrating!
 

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