LED Bulbs

Polly55

Novice Member
I tried to remove an LED bulb which is in good condition and cost £10, and the glass covering the bulb came off. Can anyone tell me if it is safe to use without the glass ?
 

simonlewis

Well-known Member
Pictures might be usefull.
 

Polly55

Novice Member
Hi Simon, the third picture is the glass that came off with the rubber suction tool I was using. I hope the picture help.
 

NorvernRob

Distinguished Member
It shouldn't be an issue at all, I have several of the small screw in type with the same SMD LED's and they don't have any glass covering. I've seen some like yours with glass and some without so I wouldn't worry.
 

John

Moderator
so long as you don't put your fingers anywhere near the SMDs you should be fine. Until it goes properly
 

Sonic67

Banned
Drop of superglue at the edge?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
It shouldn't be an issue at all, I have several of the small screw in type with the same SMD LED's and they don't have any glass covering. I've seen some like yours with glass and some without so I wouldn't worry.
I would, because the exposed solder joints often carry mains voltage :)
 

MrSossidge

Distinguished Member
Who in their right mind would want to touch them anyway. You know, just in case.
 
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Sonic67

Banned
You want to remove the bulb as you think it's blown. It's protected by a two way or intermediate switch so not obvious if the switch is isolating the fitting or not. You stick your fingers in to remove the light from the fitting, you think the switch is off, some of the solder carries mains voltage. Let's hope you don't have a split load board where the lighting circuit isn't protected and you do have a good RCD. Also bear in mind it might not be you changing the bulb.

No idea if that lots credible, but as we used to say, "lick your fingers, have a go, and let us know how you got on."
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
Just replace it.

It's a five quid lamp.

If you want to bodge it then stick the plunger on to the glass, whack some super glue on and then stick it back on.
 

Bubblin

Well-known Member
Be careful, some led bulbs have live voltage on the pcb especially cheaper versions, isolate the circuit, remove and dispose of the bulb.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Another point to bear in mind is that if the bulb has a protective glass screen, there is no reason why the pcb shouldn't have live mains electricity on the surface of it, because your'e not supposed to be able to touch it. If you accidentally pulled the back off a mainsplug, exposing the wiring you would be very careful how you unplugged it, this is no different.

See those black and red wires? One of them is very likely carrying 230-240V mains power :)
No, it is not safe to continue to use it.

 
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NorvernRob

Distinguished Member
I would, because the exposed solder joints often carry mains voltage :)
Am I wrongly assuming that it's 12 volt? If so ignore my post OP, sorry for the rubbish advice! I have 12 volt LED's both with and without glass covers.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
They are almost certainly GU10 bulbs that run on mains voltage. But it's a good point, if they are 12V it's probably fine. @Polly55 are they mains (GU10) or 12V with a transformer (most likely MR16 bulbs)?
 

NorvernRob

Distinguished Member
They are almost certainly GU10 bulbs that run on mains voltage. But it's a good point, if they are 12V it's probably fine. @Polly55 are they mains (GU10) or 12V with a transformer (most likely MR16 bulbs)?
I may be wrong here, but don't GU10 bulbs have a built in transformer to lower the voltage?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Yes, but due to brilliant design mains (or a potentially lethal) voltage is often present on the face of the pcb. It's something I was unaware of until there was a thread about it in here. I tested some open faced GU10 bulbs I had installed in the kitchen with a multimeter and binned them. I only buy covered ones now.
 

NorvernRob

Distinguished Member
Yes, but due to brilliant design mains (or a potentially lethal) voltage is often present on the face of the pcb. It's something I was unaware of until there was a thread about it in here.
Wow that's pretty poor, my ceiling lights are all MR16 but it's handy to know!
 

John

Moderator
Yes, but due to brilliant design mains (or a potentially lethal) voltage is often present on the face of the pcb. It's something I was unaware of until there was a thread about it in here. I tested some open faced GU10 bulbs I had installed in the kitchen with a multimeter and binned them. I only buy covered ones now.

I looked for that thread last night. Pretty sure @Stuart Wright posted vids in it. But couldn't find it
 

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