LCD vs. DLP picture quality

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by samwiley, Mar 20, 2001.

  1. samwiley

    samwiley
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    I recently asked to see the Tosh MT1 demonstrated, as it's a projector that I've read good things about. I liked what I saw until I was shown the picture from a similarly priced DLP projector (Davis I believe).

    Comparing the two pictures, although the Tosh was brighter with more vivid colours, I could definitely see the pixels if I looked closely. The picture from Davis on the other hand seemed more integrated with a more cinematic quality (the picture on the Tosh seemed more akin to TV). I was then shown another DLP unit (Infocus 340) and again the image seemed more integrated.

    Is this difference in picture quality always the case between LCD and DLP units or was it just the way that the shop had them set up?
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    I've read before that DLP devices show much less "chicken wire" than a similar-resolution LCD. I suspect that this is because there are no gaps between the mirrors, as there are gaps between LCD pixels. The DMD is also capable of producing denser blacks than LCDs typically can.

    However, there is one attribute of DLP devices to be aware of. It may not be apparent on first viewing when the awe of those deep blacks and well-rendered colours are what you see. It may never be apparent to you, because it depends on your visual acuity. But just so you know to look for it before parting with your cash.....

    DMDs are so expensive that most (all?) "normal" priced DLP projectors have just one DMD. A DMD is a monochrome device. To create the coloured image, the DMD is energised with the Red component of the pitcure, followed by the blue, then green (maybe not in this order).

    To coincide with this, a wheel with three coloured filters on it spins in front of the DMD. The image thus thrown onto the screen is, in fact, not a full colour picture, but a red picture, followed by green, then blue, in a repeating sequence. All this happens so fast your brain merges the colours together and you see colour.

    But, on fast moving objects, or if you pan your head to and fro, you can see rainbows around contrasty edges.

    I find the DLP rainbow to be intolerable. You may find it acceptable. But, just so you know what to watch for.
     
  3. samwiley

    samwiley
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    Thanks Nigel.

    Does this mean that I would be better going for a higher resolution (XGA) LCD projector - I know I'd have to spend more, but would the chicken wire effect be noticably reduced?
     
  4. LV426

    LV426
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    The more pixels in the native resolution of an LCD device, the less visible the chicken-wire. For example - the Sony WV10HT has 3 x 1 million pixels. There is no visible structure to the image until you get about 0.5 metre away from the screen (mine's 3 metres diagonal approx). The fewer pixels in the LCD panels, the bigger each one is (obviously) and so the more likely you are to see the chicken wire.

    But, don't discount DLP just because I can see rainbows - you may never see them. It just depends on your visual acuity. I am sensitive to refresh rates. I prefer LCDs quite simply because they don't actually have ANY flicker or refresh rate - the image is constantly illuminated. This may not apply to you.
     

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