1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

LCD v DLP Projectors

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by d.waters, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. d.waters

    d.waters
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2001
    Messages:
    680
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +10
    I'm giving some thought to getting a projector and have been looking at these types, but I am only just at the early stages of choosing. I haven't seen much in the way of Home Cinema with a projector, but use a data projector regularly.

    On the subject of LCD against DLP, the LCD type seems to be much cheaper. For example, the cheapest I have seen the Screenplay 7205 for is about £4500. It has a 1280x720 resolution, 1100 ANSI Lumens and a 2200:1 Contrast Ratio. By comparison, the expected Panasonic AE700 is listed as having a 1280X720 resolution, 1000 ANSI Lumens and a 2000:1 Contrast Ratio.

    Admittedly, Panasonic quoted spec is a little below that of the 7805, but it is only expected to cost about £1400, less than a third of the price! Is the difference between their relative performances really going to be that significant to justify such a huge difference in cost?
     
  2. leedavies

    leedavies
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Messages:
    192
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Ratings:
    +7
    There is no simple answer to this one. Some people say LCD is better, others say DLP.

    You need to demo a few models of both types to see what you think. Generally, a DLP will have a brighter image, as LCDs are less light-efficient.

    Personally, I've gone for a DLP (Screenplay 5700). After seeing demos of both LCD and DLP, I felt DLP was a smoother, brighter, more natural image.

    Some people will no doubt warn of rainbows with DLP projectors. Not everyone is affected, and newer, higher-spec/more expensive DLPs are less likely to have the problem. If you buy a low-end DLP with a slow colour wheel with less colours, you may be affected (e.g. Screenplay 4800). Go higher up (e.g. Screenplay 5700 or 7205) and less of an issue.

    Of course, others in this forum will no doubt disagree... :D
     
  3. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
    Distinguished Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    13,980
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Living in Surrey, covering UK!
    Ratings:
    +2,781
    There's alot more to a good image than any of those specs. Go view them.The only figures worth trusting from most companies are the dimensions of the box and the amount of pixels. Even then how many pixels is not a particularily good measure of possible image quality either.....

    Sorry there isn't a simple answer.

    Gordon
     
  4. theritz

    theritz
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2002
    Messages:
    2,451
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    Ireland
    Ratings:
    +27

    I wonder if we should get this engraved over the entrance to the forum...... :smashin:

    Agree completely - the key is to decide on your budget (or an upper and lower range), see what's available in the market (or what's coming onto the market), and get out there and see them running. If you're interested in a particular model, ask if there are any members who'd be willing to demo theirs for you - it really is the best way to see a PJ.

    Sean.
     
  5. d.waters

    d.waters
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2001
    Messages:
    680
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +10
    Thanks for the replies. I had decided on a budget and was looking at either the SIM2 Domino 20 or the Screenplay 5700. Then the models started to change and the Screenplay 7200 was reduced in price, etc. So I decided to wait. I then happened to see a demonstration of a Sony HS3 (which is a fairly inexpensive model, LCD and relatively low spec) and I thought it looked pretty good, and wondered why I was needing to spend so much money. To top it off, there was a thread on here about the new Panasonic, not to mention the many positive ones about the AE500, neither of which cost anything like 3 or 4 thousand pounds. So I wonder if a better approach might be to get a good inexpensive projector and then save the rest of the money, rather than spend to the budget. After all, it gives you the opportunity to buy another one sooner! One thing is for sure - whatever I get, I know I will probably want something else a few months later.
     
  6. sirp

    sirp
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2002
    Messages:
    831
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Derby
    Ratings:
    +35
    like others say, you really have to go and view them yourself, its the only way to decide. Any half-decent proj does wow you though! its big, and its ace :)

    however, some people cannot watch DLP for long, i being one on the cheaper 2500 models..i get get headaches very quickly..so had to buy LCD on my budget. i bought the panny 300 12 months ago, and love using it. For me it was a good tradeoff on cost/quality, which everyone has to do, well almost everyone :)

    spend a few weeks viewing them, then decide, im sure you will enjoy several feet of goodness at the end whatever you choose.

    i was fortunate to be able to view forum memebers proj as mentioned, it can help, as i found it hard to view many in stores.
     
  7. Kramer

    Kramer
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'd agree. Better IMO to get a decent/good entry level PJ (circa £1/1.5k, plenty of good PJs available at this price point) with a view to upgrading in a year or two.

    Best of luck :)
     
  8. LV426

    LV426
    Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2000
    Messages:
    12,756
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Somewhere in South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +4,909
    As one who is affected, I'd strongly recommend, before shelling out any amount of money on a one-chip DLP, that you spend at least a couple of hours demoing, in a darkened room, with a variety of material (but make sure you include something bright with contrasty edges), and with any family members, etc., that may share your cinema with you. If any of you find the rainbow effect nauseating (as I do) then discount this technology straight away and look for the best LCD you can. If not, then it's back to budget and "bang for buck". No straight answer, unfortunately; t all depends on your (and your relations etc) visual acuity, which varies hugely from person to person. Many will simply wonder what all this rainbow fuss is about. Others will ignore it and hope it doesn't affect them (and it won't); and others will find themselves wanting to e-bay their new device within a few weeks. And those, like me, will see the effect immediately and keep away. Over to you......
     

Share This Page

Loading...