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LCD HDTV ready TV

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by RecordablDVDfan, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. RecordablDVDfan

    RecordablDVDfan
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  2. AML

    AML
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    I wouldnt say ultimate. Good but not perfect. The Sharp 45" (dont remember the model number) has full HDTV specs (1920X1080).
    The one you have pointed out doesnt go that high in terms of resolution.

    Its early days yet.
    From this year on more full spec HDTVs will start coming out.
    LCD that is.
    Plasma is a different story.
    Theres also "SED" TV's coming from Toshiba this year. These should also be full Spec HDTVs.
     
  3. RecordablDVDfan

    RecordablDVDfan
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    So do you think for about the same price we'll see this size or bigger and full HD by the end of this year ? LCD's last longer than Plasma's also I've heard

    Err what is SED btw ?
     
  4. Steve_P

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  5. RecordablDVDfan

    RecordablDVDfan
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    So why do I read HD ready for the few LCD tv's on ebay when they are not then or not full HDTV. What is the difference ?
     
  6. AML

    AML
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    Its all sales and marketing.

    These sets WILL display HD content but not at full HD resolution which is 1920X1080 either interlaced or progressive. That would be 1080i or 1080p.

    1280X720 is also considered HD but that would only be 720p, not exactly full specs.

    My Plasma is only 1024X1024 but I can comfortably see HD content. Its just not at its full capacity.

    My advice is wait for a year and get a TV that is full spec HD and by then cheaper.
    Also make sure the TV you buy has an HDCP connection like HDMI or DVI-D. (these will be necessary for Blu Ray and HD DVD)

    Once SED TV's come out prices should drop. Not by a huge amount but at least by some.
     
  7. sn00p

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    Who says 1920X1080 is "full spec"? The official HD ready spec says 1280X720 is HD so I can't see how you can argue with that.

    Also wouldn't 1280X720 on a 26" screen be just as good, if not better than 1920X1080 on a 42"?
     
  8. sn00p

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  9. RecordablDVDfan

    RecordablDVDfan
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    How is this better than the HYundai one I gave a link to http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5764379223&fromMakeTrack=true

    In fact if you read the specs on the Hyundai it says it is ok for 1080i and is the same res.. The brightness / contrast values are slightly different, don't know what difference this makes in real terms but for £160 odd less than the Samsung it seems ok for Sky etc ?
     
  10. Welwynnick

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    The Hyundai is probably fine, but it is neither the ultimate - there are many like it, nor is it HD ready - it does not appear to support HDCP, which will almost inevitably be required for broadcast and recorded HD sources. 1080i input capability is neither here nor there. The native res is 768 lines like most hi-res displays, and sets the limit on PQ. My local John Lewis were demoing the new Sharp Titanium 45" (1080i) fed from an HTPC - that's worth looking out for if you think 720p is good enough!
     
  11. rogeralpine

    rogeralpine
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    I think manufacturers are using the "HD Ready" logo with their 720 sets as a marketing ploy - of course 720 is HD, so is 1080 - the preferred choice of many when comparing 720p with 1080i broadcasts. But with HDDVD & Blu Ray round the corner, I know what set I'd prefer to own to display 1080p.

    1080 material will be downscaled on a 720 panel - you'll lose quality in that conversion. Considering the size of the sets you are comparing, the likely distance that you are going to be sitting away from them will mean the "size" advantage of the 26" will be completely lost (personally I don't think it will have any size advantage close up) In any case, the 1080 panel has more than twice the number of pixels which under the circumstances would, IMO, compensate for the 3 times increase in surface area of the panel.
     
  12. AML

    AML
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  13. thegeby

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    Please, not another "Which is better 720p or 1080i" thread. Let just agree that both are HD, carry more or less the same amount of information, making different compromises regarding temporal and visual resolution, and are beaten by a 1080p, carrying twice as much info.

    As this forum is specifically about HD TV, it could be worth adding that it is doubtful any terrestrial system will be able to carry 1080p within the lifespan of a tv set, as the required bitrate does not fit in the channel (6MHz in the US, 7-8MHz in Europe)
     
  14. 00fjackson

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    If the US FTA HD service migrates to MPEG4 they will be able to half the required bitrate of transmissions or double the amount of image data to 1080p with the same 20Mb/s rate.

    However transission in 1080 50/60 progressive is unlikely, seen as most HD material is shot in 24/25/30 p and the US won't change to MPEG4 for many years and the UK would prefer double the channels. But HDTV will still carry source 1080 25/p as unfiltered 1080i signal to then be deinterlaced by a compatible reciever. This is of course the same bandwidth of 1080i!

    So with MPEG4 1080 50/60 p is possible but we will instead see 1080 25/30 p broadcast (as MPEG2-US, MPEG4-UK) as 1080 50/i.
     
  15. AML

    AML
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    I wasn't trying to argue that one is better than the other.
    I know from my own personal experience that there is hardly any difference between 720p and 1080i.
    But the fact is most companies are gunning to make 1080i the standard.

    Another fact is that a full spec HDTV must be 1920X1080. Are you arguing that 1280X720 is full spec HDTV?

    I also pointed out that any new set is going to need an HDCP compatible connection like HDMI or DVI-D for future formats that are also planed to be 1080i/p.

    Once 1080p starts rolling, these sets that are coming out now at 1280X720 simply wont be good enough. Not to mention that these sets being looked at in this thread dont have the necessary connections.

    Better to educate people now before they go out and spend all their hard earned cash on a TV they will need to replace in a year or two from now.
     
  16. loz

    loz
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    http://www.eicta.org/Content/Default.asp?PageID=249

    Quote:
    4. Requirements for the label “HD ready”
    A display device has to cover the following requirements to be awarded the label “HD ready”:
    1. Display, display engine
    · The minimum native resolution of the display (e.g. LCD, PDP) or display
    engine (e.g. DLP) is 720 physical lines in wide aspect ratio.
    2. Video Interfaces
    · The display device accepts HD input via:
    o Analogue YPbPr1, and
    o DVI or HDMI
    · HD capable inputs accept the following HD video formats:
    o 1280x720 @ 50 and 60Hz progressive (“720p”), and
    o 1920x1080 @ 50 and 60Hz interlaced (“1080i”)
    · The DVI or HDMI input supports content protection (HDCP)
     
  17. chambeaj

    chambeaj
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    HD DVD

    Protecting Content on High Definition Discs

    www.dvdfile.com/news/viewpoints/editors_desk/2005/04_01.html


    'When these serialized high definition discs are sold, retailers and web vendors will be required to provide purchase information based on credit card transactions to the MPAA for its database on a weekly basis. Brick and mortar shops will also be required to install networked cameras directed toward cash register positions to capture images of purchasers during sales of high definition discs. The shutter will be triggered either by the bar code scanner or manually by the salesperson if the customer turns away during the scan. That also creates a record for cash transactions. Retailers who do not comply with these anti-piracy measures will not receive product.

    So if and when a pirated copy of a specific title is either made available on the Internet or as a physical disc illegally reproduced, the MPAA will be able to analyze the specific frame where the serial number is stored, recover it, and take action against the purchaser of the source disc. So if you choose to sell a purchased high definition disc, you'd better generate a paper trail.'
     
  18. Quickbeam

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    Nice article, chambeaj.

    I particularly liked the bit about high-definition DVD players outputting films at 36 frames per second in an A BB cadence, thereby rendering all current displays incompatible. Classic!
     
  19. Quickbeam

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    I think most people would agree that a 1080p display is the one to go for - if you can afford it (and if you can find it!).

    This has nothing to with the 720p vs 1080i issue, but is more to do with the fact that 720p displays are comparatively rare, being limited mostly to DLP TVs, projectors, and a small number of LCDs. All the new LCDs have a 1366 x 768 resolution, which requires 16/15 scaling of a 720p broadcast. 720p scaled to 1080p is always going look better than 720p scaled to approximately 720p!
     
  20. MikeK

    MikeK
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    :)

    Read the date on the article and then whole article itself and you'll find it's an April Fool's prank - it even says as much at the bottom

    "And if the paranoia I've described in this article were true, I'd have to find a new hobby".
     

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