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LCD for a new home!!

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by craynerd, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. craynerd

    craynerd
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    I`m 21 and just got a new house (well move in in a week!) Basically i`ve never looked at Tvs before, but now i need to make a descision on what to buy and due to it being an appartment i think i want an LCD so i can wall mount it. The room is 12foot by 21foot, BUT thats kitchen + lounge area so as you can imagine, the telly will be viewed from around 10-8foot away.

    Firstly, what size TV should i look at buying, i have had so much adivde of home owners not to get too big a tv to look out of proportion with the room, BUT at the show rooms, the builiding is so big you loose prespective! 26", 32" ??

    Then obviously the nitty gritty, first if the TV can`t go in a corner, it has to go against a flat wall in the middle, would u a) get an lcd or plasma and b) wall mount the lcd or plasma, or just put it on a thin stand?

    I know there is loads and loads of info about actual tv makes and models on here, but a few recommendations would be good also of actual tvs to go for! i`m not on a tight budget BUT i`ve just got my first house so the cheaper the better!

    Chris
     
  2. jriihi

    jriihi
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    37" or 42" from that distance.
     
  3. pjskel

    pjskel
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    32 would be plenty fine, 37 might be a bit domineering. If you find a good local AV specialist, I'm sure they'll provide a home demo.
    Alternatively, if you buy online, then due to legal issues covering distance selling, you can return the item with 14 days, IIRC. It'll cost you P&P both ways to see which one works best for you.
    There's no right or wrong answer - just whatever you prefer or think is the best option.
     
  4. craynerd

    craynerd
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    any actual models or internet bargains you can point me out???
     
  5. pjskel

    pjskel
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    Jump online at www.pricerunner.com and see what's what.
    Best current models (so others claim) are JVC DS6, Panasonic DX500, and Hitachi seems to be getting a lot of good noises. Sharp have new models this month GA6/GD7, and Sony next month - V Series.
    Then there's Loewe if you fancy a German version of B&O, at a more 'affordable' price.
     
  6. craynerd

    craynerd
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    nice one matey! thanks for the help, ill keepyou updated with my choices!
    Chris
     
  7. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    On the wall mount/table m ount question, I've wall mounted my 32" LCD in a lounge that is 12x10 foot. It's meant that I can get 2 sofas in the lounge, one facing the tv (For watching) and one underneath the tv for when we've got guests.

    Wall mount it, it's what it's designed for !
     
  8. craynerd

    craynerd
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    yea, think i will!! I`m just online now looking for a 32" lcd, are they easy enough to mount!! must be a huge pressure on the wall!?

    Chris
     
  9. nogimmix

    nogimmix
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    They are quite easy to mount, pressure wise isn't that much of a problem as some lcd TV nearly weight less than portable 20" CRT TV's.
     
  10. pjskel

    pjskel
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    Most 32s are around the 20 kg mark. No problem for a brick wall, but stub walls will need careful placement, just to be sure.
     
  11. mattg

    mattg
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    what sort of prices will these new tv's be?

    I am looking for a 26" solution however as my room will not be so big (wall mounting not an option as I will be traveling to and from uni in the hols etc).

    is there a massive difference between the jcv d5 and d6, or is the d6 just the next model out with minor changes?

    thanks,
    Matt. (sorry for slight thread hijack).
     
  12. craynerd

    craynerd
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    just wanted to say, been to have a look at the panny dx50, think we are gonna go for that. From what i`ve read i dont think hd will be important to us for another few years, in which time it`ll be time to upgrade and we`ll be in a better financial situation to pay the cash! For now, the dx50 seems great !!

    Chris
     
  13. chowells

    chowells
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    Sorry, but you are simply wrong. The Distance Selling Regulations is absolutely not meant to be some kind of "try before you buy" thing.

    The Distance Selling Regulations gives you a "cooling off period" of seven days in which you can return new and unused goods for a refund. Not used and decided that you didn't like it.

    You might be able to get away with it but I wouldn't bet on it, you don't have the law on your side.
     
  14. pjskel

    pjskel
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    So, according to your reply, "The Distance Selling Regulations gives you a "cooling off period" of seven days in which you can return new and unused goods for a refund.", buying goods sight unseen leaves you with no get out clause? You're stuck with them?

    Sadly, you are the one unknowledgable on the definition of distance selling - it's precisely this reason that those regulations exist. Buyers of items from online retailers are afforded rights to protect themselves (from themselves often times) in the same way as are those who purchase from high street stores.

    Here's the first hit on Google.co.uk looking for "Distance Selling Regulations"
    (I added the bold text to draw your attention to the cooling off period)

    So, it would seem try before you're committed to ownership DOES exist in both good faith and law.
     
  15. stu.artd

    stu.artd
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    pjskel, I agree with you but some online retailers seem to view the DSR to only apply to new and unused goods. Even with the law on your side there can be a struggle getting the retailer to do what they're obliged to.
     
  16. chowells

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    Nope, wrong again.

    The "cooling off" period merely allows you to terminate the contract within 7 days and to get a refund. During this time you are required to "take reasonable care" of the goods. Whilst "goods" is not defined explicity, if it is considered to include the packaging then by even breaking the seal on the packaging -- let alone using it as you suggested -- you may not be eligible for a refund.

    Basically, your suggestion to buy two TVs, use both, and then return the one you don't like is an extremely bad one. Whilst you may be lucky and get the refund without problems, due to the ambiguties that exist in the law you could find yourself spending lots of money and time going to court -- and maybe loosing.

    Otherwise what do you think is going to happen to the TV that you've used for 7 days and decided you don't like it? Some other poor bugger is going to get sent your stuff which is by now effectively second hand.
     
  17. chowells

    chowells
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    So if you buy online you'd be happy to receive something that had been used for a week by a previous purchaser? Personally I wouldn't and I don't think you'll find that the law is on your side unless the goods are actually faulty.
     
  18. pjskel

    pjskel
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    Do you come from a different planet or something? It's written in black and white - "The aim of the cooling-off period is to give consumers an opportunity to examine the goods or services being offered, as they would have when buying in a shop."
    So, that says you are allowed to examine the goods or services being offered - now, how the hell do you examine ANYTHING in a box, without opening it? :confused:
    If you've invented some sort of device that allows a customer to see the goods in their boxed state, and in the case of a TV, see a broadcast without power and connections made, I'm buying into your company!
    When you buy from a store, you have the opportunity to see the product working and demo it - this is exactly what the DSR was designed to do for buyers of online sold commodities.

    I really don't see how you can't see that. :confused:
    This is where ex-demo/refurb products come from, and it's all been factored into the margins dealers get or work from.
    If I've been informed before hand that what I'll get is an opened returned unit, then so long as everything is fine and there's no marks nor missing bits, and it works perfectly, I'm not bothered by the fact somone else tried it before me and decided it wasn't for them - that's their prerogerative. And any good retailer selling online or not, will inspect the returned goods for damage and function before reselling it as opened returned.
    Failing to disclose the item as such, knowingly, is against the law, so most replutable sellers will have a policy with the manufacturers/distributors to take back the returned units for them to rebox/test and sell off as ex-demo/open returns to those resellers who buy and sell such items.
     
  19. chowells

    chowells
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    Wrong, that phrase appears no where in the actual legislation.

    If you do a google search for that phrase you'll note that it only appears on the DTI website. That is the Department of Trade and Industry's _interpretation_ of the law. A judge may very well interpret the law differently in which case you are SOL.

    AFAIK there is so far no legal precedent either way.

    Let's look at what the actual legislation (http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2000/20002334.htm) says about the "cooling off" period:

    So the legislation explicity states that the cooling off period is merely an oppurtunity to "enable the consumer to cancel the contract by giving notice of cancellation to the supplier".

    In addition the leglislation states:

    Since the legislation does not explicity state what constitutes the "goods" it would be up a judge to decide what constitutes taking "reasonable care". If you have ripped open the packaging and tried the thing that you might find you are SOL.
     
  20. pjskel

    pjskel
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    You can believe what you want to believe - I'll go with the DTI's explanation, which I presume has been checked with THEIR legal team to make sure it's accurate.
    This whole argument has not been worth my tiime, and I'm putting no more time nor effort into it.
    If you seek legal counsel, please get it in writing and scan it in to your computer, and host the resultant pdf or whatever so we can see what the solicitor wrote.
    Until then, I'll say no more on the subject.
     
  21. chowells

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    The DTI's legal team can do what they want; what matters are legal precedents decided by a judge.
     

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