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LCD burn-in for real?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by amorenod, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. amorenod

    amorenod
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    Hi all,

    I own a LG 32LX2R which, by default, shows grey borders when not in full screen, but I managed to change the borders to black via service menu.

    Yesterday, I tried the PC with a resolution of 1360x786 (16:9), instead of the usual 1024x768 (4:3), and noticed a slight variation in tone in the 4:3 borders zone, almost unnoticeable with a dvd movie. Leaving the TV in widescreen mode for a few hours seems to have solved the problem (thanks to Moto GP and the Madrid masters, the TV was in 4:3 for hours, before using the PC)

    Now I'm undecided between using widescreen modes more often (I hate all of them for 4:3 sources), grey borders ( :rolleyes: ) or no change at all.

    Looks like the effect is temporal, according to Google, but I would like to know about other experiences regarding LCD "burn-in"

    Thanks
     
  2. brakepad

    brakepad
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    I've seen LCD 'burn-in' before on a pair of 18" HP monitors which displayed the same application 24/7. The small icon in the top left of the title bar in Windows was clearly visible when the screen then displayed a plain backdrop.

    As these were work machines I never investigated trying to fix the problem but I was surprised to see it as I'd always believed LCDs were completely immune to it. They were fairly old panels though and I've not seen it on any others, so maybe things have got better with recent developments.
     
  3. richard plumb

    richard plumb
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    i'd never considered this until I noticed it recently on my philps LCD. It had the Sky banner on for around 10 minutes, as there was 'no satellite signal being received'. When I went to the sky menu, the now/next banner was still visible behind the menu.
     
  4. thelurch

    thelurch
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    When I unpacked my samsung LE40R51B 3 weeks ago there was an additional information sheet ( obviously an after thought to the manual) which warned about freeze framing and not to leave the same image on the TV for long periods, it actually mentioned burn in.

    I was surprised but then I dont know whether they are as susceptible as plasma or its just a back covering exersise by samsung
     
  5. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    LCD burn in is normally temporary, so it isn't really burn in at all, just the liquid crystal gets a bit lazy if left on the same image for a long time and so doesn't quite revert back as it would normally, this takes a long time to happen.

    I wouldn't be surprised if this was simply due to a temperature difference on the panel. The backlights do push out quite a lot of heat and energy so when those sections are constantly black they will absorb more light and heat than the other areas, this will cause the sides of the panel to become warmer. As liquid crystal behaves differently depending on temperature you see a slight difference in tones until the panel temperature has evened out again.

    If burn were at all a real problem on LCDs we would have heard about it by now from LCD computer users.

    Regards

    Phil
     
  6. ianh64

    ianh64
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    This one may blow the lazy crystal theory...

    I was recently redoing my component input calibration using DVE (digital video essentials). I can't remember what the test patten number was but it was the one that had a square patten of 0% - 100% IRE values towards the center of the screen. When using component input at 576i, one of the boxes would flicker (I would guess at 50Hz)- it was perfect at 720p via HDMI/DVI.

    Anyway, I left this patten on screen for quite some time, maybe 1/2 hour. When I moved off the screen I could still see the flickering box behind live pictures. At first I thought that It was the component input being super imposed over live channels, so I removed the disc from the DVD player and still the flickering square persisted. I thinkit was the 70% IRE square doing the flickering.

    I tried to photograph the phenomium (sp?) but moire pattens and the flicker frequency made picking out the area of flicker impossible.

    I can't remember how I got rid of it in the end. I remember having a 'soiled feeling' moment so I guess it probably even persisted after I put the TV into standby. But its all right now and I didn't need to change my trousers afterall...

    But these were certainly not lazy crystals if they were indeed flickering at 50Hz.
     
  7. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Wow how strange is that. I wonder if due to the constant change in voltage to "flicker" the pixels the capacitors for those pixels stopped working (a charge built up on those pixels a bit like static) so it wouldn't hold the picture between refreshes as well until the charge had dispearsed, which would make that area appear to flicker even when the cause was removed?

    Anyone else have any ideas?

    Seems to have been temporary thank goodness.

    Regards

    Phil
     
  8. amorenod

    amorenod
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    Looks like you're right, the first test I did yesterday after work was the PC in widescreen mode, with no problems at all.

    Exactly
     

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