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Latest LCDs A big improvement on earlier ones ?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by malibu, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. malibu

    malibu
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    HI

    im thinking of getting the lastest Toshiba 27WL56P
    thats just come out looks amazing any 1 have one, motion blur 170 degree viewing angle WXGA new digital pro system etc , what do you think have they improved from the old skool early summer ones ? is it now the time to take the plunge, panasonic vieras look stunning as well 8 billion colors wonder how many colurs CRTS have,
    MALIBU :)
     
  2. Andy3

    Andy3
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    Hi Malibu - I think the latest panels have improved their black performance (a bit!) over last years, and improvements in production have reduced the number of stuck pixels to zero in many cases.
    Viewing angle has definitely improved. We have a two-year-old Grundig 17" LCD in the bedroom, and if you get more than about 30* off-axis, the picture just washes out. Our new JVC LT26ds6b gives a watchable picture right out to the sides (although the grey-scale gets a bit peculiar...).
    As for the hype about 8 billion colours, I think it's all getting a bit much. As far as I know the human eye can't resolve more than a few hundred thousand, so what's the point? :D
     
  3. braveknight

    braveknight
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    That's a bit of a simplistic argument - it's not about the number of colours, but the difference between two shades that is important. The more colours available, the smaller difference can be represented, and the less likely you are to see a visible difference (ie. banding).

    However, you are right that 16.7 million colours has enough available shades to resolves differences small enough that very, very few (if any) would be able to see them. But other factors do come into play:

    1) Source material - compressed digital sources throw away enough information that you can be left with visible differences.

    2) Resolution - one pixel can cover an area with multiple shades / variations, and can only ever represent an 'average' of what should be there. Lower resolution means one pixel covers a 'larger area', and you are more likely to have differences between one pixel and the next that are visible.

    3) Processing - multiple stages of processing accumulate errors, as calculated shades fall between those that can be represented, and have to be rounded to a shade that can be stored / represented. Fewer colours = more rounding = more errors = more likely to see visible differences between pixels.

    Whilst 8 billion colours may be a bit OTT for actual display purposes, it may prove useful for processing to reduce accumulated errors.
     

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