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kit for filming weddings

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by magiles, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. magiles

    magiles
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    Hello there,

    I am interested in setting up a video wedding company
    and would like to know what kit and camera I would need to
    start?

    I have been playing around with a Samsung VPD87 for 2 years
    and have mastered the editing side.

    just need to know what I would need for the next stage?
     
  2. Quilgy

    Quilgy
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    I did weddings for a while, mainly high level amateur stuff. If I was going to get serious I would go for a DV camera with 3CCD because the picture quality is a level above the 1CCDs. Look for something that is good in varying light conditions as you'll be in dark churches/reception centres and in bright sunshine all on the same day.

    Add 16:9 aspect to this. I really don't think you can get away with giving people 4:3 ratio videos anymore given its a wedding video which will last for a long time, and widescreen TVs are getting much more commonplace.

    A good tripod with fluid head will make a huge difference. There can be a lot of panning at weddings, and a cheap jittery tripod will wreck a long panning shot. If you can get one with optical image stablization, that will probably perform a little better than the electronic one when you are chasing after the bride and groom when they do something random you hadn't planned for!

    Another handy item is a decent light for the accessory shoe. Some couples will not like use of this at the reception so again I stress get something with good low light performance. For those who don't mind it can make a big difference when doing vox pops and capturing footage at dusk or night.

    I never got to the point of capturing dialogue via a microphone on the groom (usually), but you should consider this.

    Something else that may add to the up front investment but which will make a big difference is to do a 2 camera shoot. You can achieve this either by having a second camera operator or position the second camera strategically on a tripod. This second camera comes in very handy for filler shots when you need to pan away from the action for some reason, or move around in a hurry.

    The thing about the ceremony and speeches is that there is often more than one interesting thing to capture - ie - crowd reactions. You can edit creatively with a one camera shoot, but you can't get the bride and groom kissing, and the look on the parents' faces at the same time!

    The final string in my bow at the time was a Mac. It ate DV for breakfast and could produce very professional DVDs. I'm sure there are good solutions for PC as well though.

    I also used to produce the DVD sleeves and use the same type of covers you'd get a commercial DVD in. Combine this with a professional looking DVD sticker and you can get a very polished product.
     
  3. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    Buy a three head red lighting kit, not chaep (around £800) but believe me, essential, apart from giving you more light it also gives you uniform light.

    You can have loads of different light sources all at the one time, from varying daylight to tungsten to flourescent and even sodium. It's impossible for the camera to balance for everything, so blast it with tungsten red heads, if the bridal party don't like it then they can't want their video that much.

    Harsh but true.
     

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