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jvc sound 20 watts (RMS)

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by nig28, Dec 12, 2004.

  1. nig28

    nig28
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    Hi
    I have been looking at some of the cheaper JVC`s and I am confused about the sound output.
    I know some of the Philips TV`s have 5 and 10 watt speakers, when looking at JVC specification thier sound output was quoted as 20 watts RMS.
    RMS - I am told that this means 2 watts!!
    Is the sound on the cheaper JVC`s (£3-400) poor, and does RMS multiply the wattage by 10.
    Nigel
     
  2. j_duqueno

    j_duqueno
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    Watts RMS (Root mean squared) is normaly about 1/3 less than Watts PMP (Peak).

    So 20 RMS = 50 PMP

    Audio signals are analogue:
    Peak = The peak signal strength
    RMS = Average signal strength

    You should also look out for if its rated per channel (speaker) or total.

    10 RMS/Channel * 2 Channels = 20 RMS Total
     
  3. Mylo

    Mylo
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  4. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    Indeed, RMS is basically the euqivalent heating effect you would get if chanelling all the output into a resistor.
    PMPO and all the others are marketing BS to fool the unwary.
    How else would it be possible to buy PC speakers at 400 watts PMPO that are each only the size of a typical spongebag ?
    Now true 400w RMS speakers would be very substantial - larger than the size of the largest allowable aircraft carry-on bag.
    They have to be to shift enough air - and that's without taking into account the lower transducer efficiency of higher power speakers.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     

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