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Jvc Dr-m1

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Rasczak, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    A brief bit of news on this machine in the current What Video & Widescreen Entertainment. Nothing we don't already know but just to summerise:

    * PAL Progressive Scan
    * DVD-RAM, DVD-RW and DVD-R recording
    * PCM Audio Recording
    * iLink input
    * Live Memory (Timeslip by another name - DVD-RAM only)
    * Slimline design
    * Library database

    The DR-M1 will be available on it's own or with the RX-ES9 creating a all-in-one 'home cinema' package. Due next month (a month earlier than expected)!

    No other major news on the DVDR front this month although Panasonic has a new DVD-RAM/-R camcorder out - the VDR-M30.
     
  2. jimmyboy

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    will it have a digital terrest. tuner
     
  3. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Given that it is not in the specs - and it would be a major feature - I doubt it. None of the current crop of DVD Recorders have a digital tuner.

    You know I sometimes wonder if the Government has told the electrical producers that they plan to replace analogue with digital because no VCRs, DVDRs and only a minority of TVs come with digital tuners at the moment.
     
  4. kenfowler3966

    kenfowler3966
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    Read an article about how most houses with kids have about 4 tv's on average, plus presumably videos with each, all relying on analogue transmissions so each person in the house can watch a different program. This is as a result of homes converting to widescreen with huge numbers of still serviceable family tv's and existing portables pressed into use in other rooms

    Any goverment that forces the whole family to congregate around one tv again, as it has the only digital source, with all the arguments and resultant costs that will cause, will soon find itself voted out of office.

    I can't believe they have really thought it through, as although there may be at some stage be 95% of homes with digital reception, they will overnight make some 150,000,000, with a replacement value of around £45billion, receiving appliances obsolete. Even now if you go into comets etc, you will probably buy an analogue receiver, albeit in a tv, vcr or even a dvd recorder, and the life expectancy of all these should extend well beyond even conservative switch off dates.

    It will be the fridge mountain mark 2, as all the serviceable, but not worth adding a freeview or sattelite box to, receivers are cast out, and a huge impact on the countries import deficit as 20 plus million households have to replace their obsolete equipment. Who is going to pay £99 for a freeview box to make an £80 portable work again? Its even worse if the portable is say 5 years old and has effectively no value anyway. Is the goverment going to supply 150m freeview boxes as compensation as part of selling off the airwaves again, at £15 billion, I very much doubt it. What makes it worse is the 3G debacle where all the "successfull!!" companies are now in trouble, having bought something that will probably never make a return on their investment. Surely any simmilar future sale is unlikely to return the sort of funds the goverment is anticipating

    Indeed on consevation grounds alone this proposal ought to be ruled out. It is bad enough sending defunct electrical components to a landfill site, it is even worse doing so prematurely whilst they are still serviceable.
     
  5. malcom

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    As a snap judgment I used to believe that the sooner the terrestrial broadcasts were turned off the better. I no longer think that way. in fact i don't think they should or can be turned off in the foreseeable future for reasons already stated.

    Also I used to visit a large nursing home and it was there I realized who is going to pay for all the residents "some free" TV's to be converted to recieve digital.

    The main reason i would not like to see terrestrial switched off is because of the low digital picture quality that digital broadcasters are allowed to get away with. Cramming as many cheapo channels as the system will allow. Quantity with quality going straight out of the window.

    With TV screens getting larger and cheaper and digital channels on low bit rates giving appaling quality there is a terminal contradiction here that will make the terrestrial broadcasting unacceptable to switch off.

    I don't know how these things work in the sense of what body of people are responsible for TV picture quality control. But unless low quality picture channels are refused licence until they meet sensible standards then terrestrial TV should never be switched off. Ramble over. feel better now..:D
     
  6. aaronjon

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    my first idtv was a 28" with an ondigital receiver inside, some good now, with no software back up, my second idtv was a 32" grundig, who is going to back up software for that now they have gone back to the fatherland.
    there were no mountains of 405 line tv`s when we changed to 625, there were no mountains of b&w tv`s when we changed to colour, digital will be the same progression with a set top box available for the rather good value large screen analogue tv`s still on sale now and for some time to come.
    in fact video seperates may be the way to go (in my case for sure), as with audio.
     
  7. kenfowler3966

    kenfowler3966
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    This is just not correct. When 625 line sets were brought in the transmitters for 405 sets continued to work for many years, at least 15 if I remember correctly, so all the sets continued in use as primary or secondary tv's for a reasonable service life. Similarly b/w 625 sets made perfectly adequate second tv's and continued to work to the present day.
    The government are planing to switch off the 625 line transmissions in as little as 4 years time, and all the present equipment will cease to function unless adaptors are provided.
    Within a few weeks of that switch off there will be something like 100,000,000 receiving appliances sent to the dump.
     
  8. Rasczak

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    Have to say I agree with Kenfowler on this one. The fact is that every VCR/DVDR, every analogue TV etc that is available now is expected to reach the end of it's current lifespan BEFORE the switch off of the analogue signal. The idea of purchasing a digital TV converter for every piece of kit is just simply unrealistic.

    Technolgies like the advent of colour was backwards compatible with existing TVs (i.e. a B&W TV was still perfectly watchable). However digital TV isn't. And we're not even close to every home have their primary TV with a digital tuner - let alone bedroom/kitchen TVs or VCRs.

    And, from a home cinema point of view, adding an adaptor can take up a Scart socket (even an RGB scart socket) which can create connection 'issues' for other equipment we have - e.g. DVD players, Sky digiboxes. And then there is the question do you limit yourself to one adaptor - in which case your equipment could only see one channel at once. I agree there are ways around all of these (i.e. get Sky, switching boxes) but they are limited factors in the whole issue. And traditionally tuners have always been built into TVs/VCRs.
     
  9. Robbie34

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    I think you mean analogue broadcasts will be switched off, and not 625 line transmissions.
     
  10. calscot

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    In four years time I'll guarantee that digital set top boxes will be ten a penny, well about 20 quid. They're already down to £60. Four of these for the average house hold would be about the price of a new budget 14"portable. So there won't be too much stuff being dumped.

    Cheers,
    Cal.
     
  11. GadgetObsessed

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  12. calscot

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    £20 for multi region is a complete rip off seeing as all you do is open the tray press a few numbers and close it again...

    This is on my short list along with the Pioneer 5100 and the Kiss 600. It all depends on price and reviews.

    Cheers,
    Cal.
     
  13. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Calscot - it's just my personnel opinion but your shortlist consists of three very different machines (AFAIK the Kiss 600 is a HDD recorder and DVD player - correct me if I'm wrong) - all of which have different applications. Anyway I would suggest asking these questions:

    1) Do you want to make high quality, editted DVD-Rs without referring to a PC DVD Burner?

    2) Do you want a HDD machine for timeshifting with the ability to burn directly onto disk if required?

    If the answer to EITHER question above is 'yes' then you should seriously consider a HDD/DVDR combo - in which case, provided your prepared to hold fire until mid-November - your shortlist should be the Pioneer 510, Panasonic E100 and Panasonic HS2 (which will probably be available for throw away prices come November). I discounted the Toshiba as I assume you want RGB in otherwise add it to your list.

    If not then a standalone is probably the way ahead for you - and in such a situation then, if you've discounted DVD-RAM due to personnel requirements, the choice should be between the JVC, Sony GX7 and Pioneer 310. If you haven't discounted RAM only then add the E50 and upcoming Samsung to the list.

    Do you see what I'm saying? A HDD/DVDR combo isn't necessarily the best option for everyone but if it is for you then I would suggest ONLY such machines are for you (i.e. you will not be happy with a standalone unless you have a something to add that missing functionality, i.e. a PC DVD Burner etc)
     
  14. calscot

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    Rasczak,

    The answer to 1 is not very often but it could come in handy. I think I'd probably only archive bbc films to bypass the fiddling with advert breaks.

    The answer to 2 is yes. But that's only for the convience of having 80GB of disk space instead of looking for a spare blank all the time. An 80gb disc also allows you to record in HQ/XP mode for all your films.

    I think either solution would suit me and I would prefer the HDD for ease of use and advantages but the mitigating factors are progressive scan and price.

    I'm already going to take a hit with my philips recorder so I would prefer to spend around £400 on a new machine. I might stretch to possibly £600 at the most for an HDD machine. That eliminates the E100 as it is earmarked for a price tag of about £800.

    Lack of PAL prog is a complete deal breaker. That elimintaes the HS2 no matter how good or how cheap it is.

    The Sony is too expensive, no pal prog and has had poor reviews.

    I like the idea of the KISS DP600 which I'm pretty sure has an 80gb HDD and a DVD-RW/CD-RW recorder - I think you're thinking of the DP508. However both these machines seem to be vapourware at the moment. The divX and mpeg4 etc makes the machine seem pretty future proof which, seeing as I'm already trading in after one year. gives peace of mind.

    The JVC is reputed to have an online price of £350 which is bank account friendly, has progressive scan and records on both RAM and -RW meaning you have a choice of compitibility or functionality. It also sounds like a very well specced machine and a looker too although I'm not sure about that long blue light on the disk tray when watching films on a pj. Could be very distracting unless you can turn it off.

    I've only just learned about the Pioneer but it also has pal prog and the marque has a great DVD PQ reputation. If this machine comes out soon for about £600, I would seriously consider it for the convience of HDD and prevention of upgraditis next year. With an HDD machine I'm willing to use write once discs for compitiblity as I can decide to burn discs retrospectively negating the need to decide beforehand and the disc wastage that could ensue.

    So I still see both types of machine as suitable depending on cost.
    The kiss is the dark horse of the pack.

    Cheers,
    Cal.
     
  15. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Fair enough. I just thought I'd point it out as the three machines you quote all have different specs/uses. Still you clearly know what you want so I'll shut up :)

    AFAIK neither the upcoming 510 nor the E100 have PAL Progressive - I know the US versions have PS but ALL DVD recorders over there have this. I could be wrong though. But if correct it means you have ruled out all the HDD/DVDR combos for the time being.
     
  16. calscot

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    I agree but there is a large area of commonality of functionality which can make them all useful to the same person - ie timeshifting.

    Comments are always welcome as they inform me, make me think and give me feedback on my thoughts. I prefer dialogue to monologues anyday. :)

    Cheers,
    Cal.
     
  17. GadgetObsessed

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    I’m not sure whether to go for the JVC DRM1 or the Pioneer 310. Both appear to meet my main requirements i.e. PAL progressive, iLink and timeslip. (The Pioneer appears to be the first –RW to do this.) The Pioneer 510s 80Gb hard disk may be useful if the price difference isn’t too great.

    If a machine supports HiMat does it mean that it can read JPEGs/MP3s from DVD-R/-RW/-RAM or only from CD-R/RW?

    If all the other features are the same (and I don’t have a PC-burner) is there much advantage of the JVC having DVD-RAM?
     
  18. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Has the Pioneer 310 actually been confirmed as having PAL Progressive? I know the US version does (NTSC PS anyway) but then so do most US DVD Recorders. I may be out of touch on this but I'm yet to see it mentioned.

    Not really. If you plan to do PC editting then yes (due to drag and drop nature of RAM which means you can rename files without copying to HDD first). I would also suggest RAM media is more suitable for Timeslip as DVD-RW needs to spin up to 2x speed and has a shorter life expectancy (making it less suitable for day to day use). But I would suggest for short term use there is little between them.

    What I would point out is that currently the JVC is going to have a RRP of £350 whereas the 310 is currently advertised for £500ish.

    HiMAT currently means MP3 files (within standard encoding ranges), Windows Media (Audio) files, Windows Media (Video) files, JPEG image files (again within standard parameters) and MPEG4 video. Although hardware specific such media should be able to be read off any type of DVD or CD. I doubt any producers will exclude CD playback but politics will doubtless prevail with regards the DVD formats.
     
  19. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    I don't know if anyone else has seen but Unbeatable now have the JVC DMR1 up for pre-order for £342. That's only £60 more expensive than the E50 (!). Here's the link:
    http://www.unbeatable.co.uk/CatalogueItem_14203.html

    JVC have also launched two other, PAL Progressive players, the VA-NA77 and XV-NA7 - both of which can play DVD-RAM disks (and presumably DVD-RW in VRO format).
     
  20. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    DVD-RW life span on new hardware (Pioneer 310) is rated upto 10,000 rewrites now. Used once a day, DVD-RAM will last you 273 years, DVD-RW will last you 27 years. Either way each DVD-RAM or DVD-RW disc purchased is more than capable of lasting up to the next format we move to.

    You can also do this with DVD-RW, although I would always recommend copying to the hard-drive first, it is safer and leaves the original in tact.

    Regards

    Philip
     
  21. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Where did you get that from? The disk life span is a result of the disk production not it's use in a specific machine.

    Briefly a DVD-RW works by utlilising a recording layer, which is polycrystalline in nature, and selectively heating it above the melting temperature of the layer thus 'recording' data. The atoms in this layer then cool, causing the compound to solidify and 'store' the data. To erase the disks the temperature of the laser is reduced to below the melting temperature but above crystalline temperature which causes the disk to revert back to the polycrystalline nature. Both DVD-RW and DVD+RW work in this way (but DVD-RW writes in between the ATIP spirals whereas DVD+RW writes onto the ATIP spirals).

    Anyway as you can see the life of the media is effected by how many times you can melt and re-crystallise the recording layer not by the machine that is burning it. Thus lifespan of such media is always effected by the quality of the dye used in the disk but even HQ stuff will have degraded after approximately 1000 re-writes.

    A DVD-RAM disk works in an entirely different way of groves and tracks meaning the lifespan is not affected by dye.

    I agree the net effect is the same but with RAM you can rename the files on the disk thus being able to demux from the disk and edit the VRO container from the disk. This can knock several hours off the whole process. It's not that much of an advantage agreed but it is still an advantage.
     
  22. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    This has been confirmed by Pioneer themselves, using the new version of DVD-RW and better write strategies life has been increased upto 10 times.

    “(2) Application of new Precision Recording Technology
    Based on the review result of the overwrite performances of a variety of DVD-RW discs, the DVR-A06-J utilizes a sequence that enables writing under the best conditions at all times. Through this technology, Pioneer succeeded in improving initial writing performance and keeping the deterioration of these qualities through repeated writing to a minimum. As a result, the DVR-A06-J ensures stable writing even on discs that are frequently rewritten and prevents writing errors due to variations in disc quality. The DVR-A06-J achieves an improvement in DVD-RW re-writing performance of approximately 10 times*6 compared with the company's previous models.” See: http://www.pioneer.co.jp/press/release116.html

    +RW, DVD-RW and DVD-RAM all use the exact same recording method, phase change. You are confusing the tracking elements with the actual physical method of recording the dots.

    The reason DVD-RAM is rated upto 100,000 rewrites is because it is manufactured with a 5 layer process. Extra layers include protection for the phase change material, this extra protection allows it use a more sensitive material. +RW and DVD-RW are a 3 layer disc (done so to make them cheaper and easier to manufacturer), so have less protection for the phase change material so use a more robust but less sensitive crystalline, which results in a lower life span. Of course 5 layers is one of the reasons why DVD-RAM is more expensive, as it costs more. (see: http://www.optodisc.com/tech.html)

    The write strategy plays an important part, the more clever it is, the better it is able to compensate for the wear in the phase change material. After many years of research Pioneer/TDK have been able to improve this, along with more powerful lasers and improvements in the media, the number of re-writes have improved, not surprising, things improve with time.

    The tracking system has nothing to do with the life of the media, the tracking system doesn’t age at all, it is the phase change material that wears out. DVD-RAM is phase change or are you saying it isn't? DVD-RAM uses a more sensitive phase change material to give a longer life (also slightly less reflective), because of that it requires a 5 layer manufacturing process to protect it, which gives an increased cost to the product. There is nothing more special than that. You pay a price and get longer life. If you live for 273 years you may get it paid back :)

    I was pointing out that DVD-RAM isn’t the only media you can rename the file. Users of DVD-RW can just as easily rename the file and do the same thing, as easy as right clicking, chosing rename!

    Regards
     
  23. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Y9ou've misunderstood the article slightly. It does not mean a longer lifespan for media - it means improved reliability. If you remember one of the criticisims of DVD-RW is that is lacks the defect management that is incorporated into DVD+RW and built into hardware in DVD-RAM. The development of Distributed Realtime Defect Management is designed to counter this (and does so effectively) but does not increase the lifespan of the disks because that is impossible without different media. A recording layer will only melt and reform so many times before degrading - the quality of the kit is somewhat irrelvent.

    Therefore, the quote:
    is referring to what it says "the writing performance", i.e. how well it works in each individual case. This is especially true with older DVD-RW media.

    That said the article is slightly irrelevant because the upcoming Pioneer models, the 310 and 510, are based on the 3100 and 5100 cores which both use an integrated drive based on the A05 with modified firmware (still based on UDF 2.0 though).

    But because it is not a random access media you can't perform a demux so renaming it on disk is rather a waste of time! Don't get me wrong DVD-RW is a good media but it doesn't have all the features of DVD-RAM (and vice versa) which is why we have both (politics and individual company developments aside).

    No I'm not. I agree more-or-less with the tech specs you state but disagree that the tracking has nothing to do with it as this enables a higher degree of accuracy with degraded material - the net result meaning a longer life-span.
     
  24. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    I have not mis-understood it all. The defect management and increase in rewrites are too separate improvements to DVD-RW, this is quite clear.

    No, this is incorrect, the 310 uses the newer hardware, as stated on the Japanese page, the rewriting ability is improved on RW media in the same way it is on the A06. It uses the newer engine (assuming the improvements are not just firmware related?) in which case it uses the newer firmware so amounts to the same thing, and is not irrelevant. See http://www.pioneer.co.jp/press/release399-j.html, you will need to use a translator if you do not read Japanese.

    Why can you not do a demux with DVD-RW?

    Actually the tracking system of DVD-RAM is less robust than DVD-RW and +RW, hence it was born requiring a cartridge for protection. Never yet seen a DVD-RW or +RW drive come with software for checking dust levels on them, yet DVD-RAM this is a standard part of the software bundle! As the site I linked to before points out for DVD-RW, "The advantage of Wobbled Groove recording is its durability to tiny defect. The data and the address are saved on the wobbled groove. "

    DVD-RAM is great for data, and that makes it great also for video applications, however for most people its lifespan is overkill and cost of media is higher than others. DVD-RW is emerging as sensible option for allowing time-slip, the same editing facilities, plus the option to make a disc that is compatible with a large chunk of existing DVD Players. It doesn't come in a cartridge at all, where as DVD-RAM does, and for that to then play in the majority of newly emerging DVD-RAM players, has to be removed from the cartridge, defeating one of DVD-RAMs strengths, its robustness due to being protected. This is plain stupid in my opinion.

    Without a cartridge RAM is much more vulnerable to scratches and dust than either DVD-RW or +RW. Lets face it, most discs get damaged due to poor handling. Add in DVD-RAM being extra sensitive when "naked", and the fact people have to fiddle with removing the thing from the cartridge, it is a very big negative that players do not really support fully DVD-RAM.

    So if we have naked DVD-RAM discs going backward and forwards, we might as well use +RW or DVD-RW, as once naked, DVD-RAM is much more like to suddenly become "read-only" in the recorder, and one of the biggest advantages of DVD-RAM being robust is completely lost.

    Regards

    Philip
     
  25. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    I think you'll find what I say is bang on - and of course your not exactly without bias are you? As a purchaser of the DVDR7000 (Pioneer's one and only contribution to UK DVDR for the last 2 years!). I assume you'll be upgrading your recorder when the Pioneer's come along? Preferrably to something that can actually do RGB in (unlike the DVDR7000)?

    Ok - one second your saying that the Pioneer A06 "utilizes a sequence that enables writing under the best conditions at all times" and now your saying that is entirely seperate from the claim of an increased "re-writing performance"? What then causes this claim? Magic? Or the defect management chip as part of the A06 hardware?

    No your wrong on this. Having spoken to the UK Pioneer rep I know the UK 310 is based on the A05 without a shadow of a doubt. This means it does not have the DBI Onboard Chip and so lacks the hardware elements of what your talking about. Perhaps you are looking at the Japanese version of the 310H whereas our model is to be based on the 3100. If you doubt this give Pioneer UK a ring and find out! Check the specs in the trade magazines as well and you'll find the drive code is "DVR-A05".

    I don't think I've ever argued this. I fully accept as DVD-RAM came first (for PCs anyway) it is based on older technology. But that doesn't mean it's not sound which is why is has so many more read/writes.
     
  26. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Your incredible Rasczak, you are trying to discredit me while making other readers think you are the number one authority on DVD Recording by telling people I have a DVD-RW recorder and so I am biased and must be making it all up. So we assume then that you do not own a DVD-RAM recorder and are completely neutral :) (A case of the pot calling the kettle black).

    No I have no intentions on upgrading, what I have now fills my needs perfectly.

    I am not saying anything, those were quotes from the links I gave. New Pioneer drives support defect management, they also support methods of writing to RW that allow it to perform better. Why do the two things have to be linked or the same thing? It is quite clear to me.

    Mmm, the Pioneer reps I have spoken to invariably get things wrong, they are salesmen, not technicians designing the things! :)

    Which was one of the points I was making. Who needs 100,000 rewrites? The only reason Panasonic went the extra mile in adding more layers to the spec to increase the number of rewrites was due to DVD-RAM being targeted at commercial uses when it first arrived, not so Aunt Jean can record 200,000 hours of Eastenders before needing to buy a new disc (assuming 2 hour rate). I doubt any Panasonic unit is expected to last as long as 400,000 hours of use to use up a whole disc in this way! (200,000 hours to record and 200,000 hours to watch back). This is around 20 years of continuous television watching!!! A DVD-RW disc assuming the old engine and only 1000 rewrites is more than adequate for the majority of people!

    All I am saying is that DVD-RAM having a life of 100,000, while sounding good, isn’t a reason to buy DVD-RAM, unless you are planning to live for ever watching TV :)

    Trade magazines, why on earth would they quote the drive code as DVR-A05, this is the retail drive code for the boxed writer that comes with software etc. How is that at all relevent to a set-top recorder? Besides internally the drives are not the same as the PC Drive, they are phyiscally different and can not be swapped out. They may be based on IDE/ATAPI but have smaller ribbon cable connections and different fan/fitler arrangements. The drive code would never be the same as the PC drive.

    Regards

    Philip
     
  27. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    To some degree - although I pride myself on having DVD+RW and DVD-RAM recorders in my house as well as two PC drives that can burn to DVD-RW. When the upcoming JVC is released I will buy that as well giving me a set-top DVD-RW recorder. So yes I am biased (I know which format I prefer :D) but then I also have also had extensive practical use of all of them ;)

    You mean the A06 does - and the 310/510 does not have this drive...

    But then this was at a technical fair - and the people there know the product very well. From what they said I think the Pioneer 510 is going to be the product to watch - doesn't mean it's got the DBI Chip though.

    I should point out that all the life-expectancies are "upto x read/writes". Many, of all formats, will fail long before that. But, statistically, if designed for a longer lifespan the media will last longer. It just ensures the odds of it failing with that 'dearly wanted' recording does not happen!

    And, yes, I do want to live forever watching TV... :D
     
  28. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    They do not fail of course or suddenly stop working at a set number. Jitter value increases for each rewrite, they start to decline from the very first write. DVD-RW is set at 1000 rewrites as generally from that point onwards jitter passes the DVD Specification of 8%, however most modern equipment should cope with that rewrites should go higher. TDK were seen as saying their DVD-RW discs are okay upto 10,000 rewrites (before the A06), however I can not find that referenced on the net anymore, but will try.

    Just what is the DBI chip?

    Regards

    Philip
     
  29. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    The DBI (Defective Block Information) Chip is the feature by which defect management occurs in the A06 drive. If the drive reports, using the Defective Block Information EDR (Enhanced Defect Reporting), that a DVD-RW disc is defected in a specific area this chip allows it to search for the next rewritable area. It has the potential (in PCs or Set-tops with HDD or even onboard memory) to be able to automatically skip the defective area next time the disk is recorded to. The chip has onboard memory which enables the host (i.e. the PC or set-top) to perform the defect management operation at a later time. Thus, no influence appears during the real time recording.

    It's a great technology - way ahead of DVD+RWs "defect management" and better than the hardware process DVD-RAM goes through. The only low point is that it is Pioneer technology that, although will doubtless be available for licence, will almost certainly not be taken up by Sony etc who will develop there own (proberly lesser) system.

    I would also suggest that defect management is probably over-stated by all camps now - technically DVD+RW has the weakest system (although it's arguable) but it still records well. In no way should that view marr this technology though - the DBI chip is something to get excited about.
     
  30. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    Thanks for the explanation, what you basically mean by the DBI Chip is that Pioneers defect management system is included.

    While I can appreciate this for data, for video applications I am not so sure the worth. I have been using DVD-RW for over 18 months, with some cheap Princo DVD-RW that has seen better days, (dropped and scratched, dusty, the odd fingerprint although not through my handling!) and I have yet to see a single glitch on any recording. It would be hard to improve on that although there is already some element of defect management through software and the UDF file system. Maybe the hardware chip will remove a layer of complication from the software making the units cheaper to test and program.

    Regards

    Philip
     

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