Just been hit by lightning

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by DJT75, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. =adrian=

    =adrian=
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    Which software do you use for automatic backup process?
     
  2. =adrian=

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    Also I should replace my surge protected extension lead my PC is connected to. The "surge protected" light on it died many years ago :eek:
     
  3. =adrian=

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  4. imightbewrong

    imightbewrong
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    Dropbox
     
  5. EarthRod

    EarthRod
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  6. imightbewrong

    imightbewrong
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    Haven't tried OneDrive. Strongly recommend against Amazon Drive after battling with it, and it's 'support team' for a couple of months.
     
  7. shoestring25

    shoestring25
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    isnt the most important thing a surge protector for your tv aireal cable as thats usually how you get hit
     
  8. westom

    westom
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    Learn more from the experience. Lightning is an electrical current that must connect a cloud to earthborne charges many kilometers away. A best path(apparently) was via your telly antenna, destructively through many appliances, then out to earth. Damage directly traceable to human mistakes.

    If a lightning rod had connected that surge direct to earth, then it need not find a path destructively via household appliances. Same applies to every incoming utility wire (ie AC electric). A direct strike far down the street can also be a direct strike to all household appliances. Again, because the current was not connected to earth at the service entrance.

    Damage is because that current was all but invited inside. Once inside, then nothing can protect from that currents - a destructive hunt for earth. No magic box even claims to provide that protection.

    Informed homeowners properly earth the antenna by a hardwire that remains outside. Then a lightning strikes to that antenna need not obtain earth destructively via appliances. And yes, the quality of earth ground defines how much energy dissipates harmlessly in earth. Protection increases with better earthing.

    Every incoming wire must also connect to single point earth ground. This is a more common source of surges. And based upon your damage, the actual incoming path. A surge incoming on AC mains went hunting for earth ground via so many appliances - destructively.

    Normally, lightning does not have sufficient energy to create some of that pictured damage. Lightning creates plasma paths. Then something with far more energy (a follow through current) struck some appliances with much more energy. That plasma path existed because effective protection did not connect lightning low impedance (ie less than 3 meters) to single point earth ground.

    It is not as simple as you first suspected. Those magic boxes (ie Belkin) do not even claim to protect from destructive surges. Anyone can read those near zero numbers. Most do not - as demonstrated by so many who recommended them.

    Two potential incoming paths exist - a direct strike to antenna or structure. And a direct strike to incoming utility wires (even if underground). Your damage implies the latter. You did not have a 'whole house' protector, properly earthed, on AC mains. That explains so much damage. These effective solutions come from other manufacturers known for integrity including Keison, ABB, AEL Group, Schneider Electric, and Siemens. Not from the many magic plug-in box manufacturers.

    Bottom line is this - and what requires most of your attention. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Most who make recommendations do not know and have never heard any of this.
     
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  9. NorvernRob

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    Definitely get the valuation sorted, I'd imagine £50k is the absolute minimum for most houses. Also, there will almost certainly be a clause in your policy wording that says if you under-insure, you won't be covered at all in the event of a total loss. The last few policies I've taken out have all had that in there somewhere.
     
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  10. =adrian=

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    I just checked. I've got 15k content on mine. I thought "content" means all "items", and not walls, floors, etc.?
     
  11. IronGiant

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    I know one member came a cropper when they were burgled and their total contents insured were too low. Even though what was stolen was less than total contents insured the company applied a formula to reduce their pay out. e.g. Contents Value 60K, Contents insured 30K: Claim 10K, payout rate 60/30 = 50% Payout 5K. (Illustrative figures only).
     
  12. =adrian=

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    It's nearly impossible to give a correct figure. Looks like that's just another way for them to get out from paying. I cannot possible know a price of everything inside of the house. Or is it a case of, what I think it's all worth, times 2, and give them that figure.
     
  13. DJT75

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    Someone said to me today, imagine turning your house upside down and shake it like a piggy bank. Everything that falls out or comes lose enough to rattle around is your contents insurance. Shaken hard enough that's got to include all fixtures, fittings & flooring.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
  14. McVicar

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    Most fixtures and fittings come under buildings insurance
     
  15. EarthRod

    EarthRod
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    Maybe your post is focused more on business premises where it is vital that office equipment is not effected by a lightning strike and have to take measures you refer to.

    Unfortunately Mr & Mrs Average in their 3-bed semi can only rely on either unplugging their TVs etc before a storm and/or purchasing anti-surge leads/plugs/devices from Maplin or Amazon or wherever.

    Note also there are many technically savvy members on this forum who know precisely what you're talking about, it is after all avforums - the clue is in the title.
     
  16. westom

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    Those do not even claim to protect from typically destructive surges. Those claim to protect from surges already made irrelevant by what is inside appliances. If in doubt, then cite one who posted specification numbers.

    Effective protection for homes costs about £1 per protected appliance. How many times more do you pay for the near zero joules protector from Maplin?

    Nothing new was posted. This is how it was done everywhere that damage could not happen even 100 years ago. Problem is that a majority are not educated by science. A majority even ignore specification numbers. These well proven solution were even demonstrated by Franklin over 250 years ago. Demonstrated is how easily a majority can be manipulated.

    None of this is new or difficult. Protection has always been about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate. The underlying concept was taught to all in primary school science. And still, so many are so attached to the first thing told as to refuse to learn the science and relevant numbers.

    This stuff is so simple, so less expensive, and so well proven that surge damage is traceable to human mistakes - such as very expensive and near zero joule protectors sold in Maplin.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
  17. DOBLY

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  18. westom

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    Funny you should mention that. One guru who defines effective protection and defined protectors that can even make damage easier wrote an IEEE paper entitled "Surging the Upside-Down House". His paper and conclusion describe damage because an adjacent (point of connection) protector existed:
     
  19. westom

    westom
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    Actually no protector does protection. Not one. Protector (ie whole house) is only as effective as its earth ground. Protector is only a connecting device to what does protection. Protection is always defined by the item that harmlessly absorbs hundreds of thousands of joules.

    If any wire in any incoming cable does not make a low impedance (ie less than 3 meter) connection to single point ground, then protection is compromised. Concepts such as conductivity and equipotential apply.

    Best protection for a TV cable is a hardwire low impedance (ie less than 3 meters) to earth.

    BT cannot connect phone wires to earth. So a protector does what that hardwire does better - make a low impedance (ie no sharp wire bends) connection to what defines that entire layer of protection.

    Two concepts apply. Lightning is typically 20,000 amps. So a minimal 'whole house' protector is 50,000 amps. That defines protector life expectancy over many decades and many direct lightning strikes. Protection during each strike is defined by the quality of single point earth ground and its low impedance (ie hardwire not inside metallic conduit) connection to that electrode.

    This is how it was one over 100 years ago all over the world when damage could not happen.

    For a best protector, above numbers are provided. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground.
     
  20. DOBLY

    DOBLY
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  21. mjn

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    Yup, i'd like to see the scientific proof from the insurance companies that God created the lightning and not some atmospheric conditions........
     
  22. imightbewrong

    imightbewrong
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    "Sorry, I'm not paying my premium this year due to an act of God"
     
  23. ChuckMountain

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    Its an estimate at the end of the day and your contents value may well increase in time, as you buy more stuff so you need to keep a check on it. Also its the new replacement value so if you bought a CRT TV 15 years ago for £1k then for insurance purposes it is still £1k regardless of the fact it may have no resale value now.

    There are some tools out there on insurance websites that allow you to calculate what contents you have based on each room and give a total contents figure.

    I used Hiscox in the past for this but they seemed to have moved to unlimited contents and become more expensive. The AA have one here

    Home contents insurance calculator | AA

    This Hiscox one was better as it took various details, like the size of your house, how many people lived there, I think a salary bracket and then produced a first pass estimate. For each room you can then tweak the amount of various items in it. The first time I ran it came up with about £80k (4 bed + 4 people family) or so of contents, which somewhat freaked me out as I think I had previously estimated between £30 and 40k. I had a look at the breakdown of contents and it was too high on bedroom furniture and clothing for example but too low on AV stuff, so by tweaking it to my needs by the time I was happy with it was mid 60k's. So you could argue I was only insuring 50% of my true contents value.

    I renewed my house insurance in the last week with £75k of cover (was in 25k chunks) and buildings with accidental damage for £210 + some cashback which I didn't think was too bad.
     
  24. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    I do like the analogy the upside shaken house but I think the advice from the Financial Ombudsman Service is pretty clear

    issue 30 - home insurance - "buildings" or "contents"-

    buildings insurance covers the structure of the building, plus permanent "fixtures and fittings" such as baths, fitted kitchens etc. The test is - can it reasonably be removed and taken to another home- If it can, then it is part of the "contents" and it will not generally be covered by a buildings policy. Buildings policies usually include outbuildings - garages, garden sheds etc

    So for example carpets are covered under contents because they can be taken up fairly easily and moved to the new house. (Whether you want to or not is a different matter)

    However a wooden floor that is glued together couldn't be easily removed without damage and so is considered under buildings content.
     
  25. ChuckMountain

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    I really hope you get sorted on this, has the insurer mentioned about sending a lost adjuster out yet, particularly if you have damage to the house? The policies I have had in the last few years all have a clause for paying a proportion of the claim if under insured. Which in your case could be only paying 20% of what your claim would be.

    I realise people go for the cheapest option but given its one of the big numbers on the quote surely £10k would stand out as being far too little.
     
  26. ChuckMountain

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    A lot of us on this site will have more than £10k worth of AV gear and Blu-Ray, DVD and other media alone :)
     
  27. =adrian=

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    Thank you for that. It looks like I need to rethink my approach to this. 3 bedroom house, 3 of us and I only have 15k of content insrance. I think it is expensive to change detail mid way, so I might be crossing my fingers nothing major happens until April :)
     
  28. ChuckMountain

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    You should be able to change, if you are paying monthly then its easy enough to change. If annually there are usually T&C's that show you the refund amount etc. Maybe worth getting a quote to see what difference would be. How much are you paying out of interest?
     
  29. =adrian=

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    I think most of those companies charge 40 or 50 for changing details mid way. I don't fancy giving them any more money. I went for one with many add ons. Close to £200 IIRC (paying monthly). Admiral.
     
  30. imightbewrong

    imightbewrong
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    "Hello - I've just gone out and bought £35K worth of stuff - can I update my insurance?" :p
     

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