July 2020 Photo Competition - Voting Thread

July 2019 Photo Competition - Voting Poll


  • Total voters
    10
  • Poll closed .

Zone

Moderator
Well done to those who entered this month :thumbsup:

The theme for July was "Automobiles":cool:

Please view the attached thumbnail file to view all the entries; please let me know if yours isn't there!

ContactSheet-001.jpg



TBC a huge thank you to Gordon @ for his continued support throughout the years and his offer of a free ISF calibration to a TV/projector of your choice to the winner :thumbsup:

The closing date for votes will be shown at the top of the poll and don't forget that all votes are public so no voting for yourself :nono:

Also if you have entered a picture then you are expected to vote, else all votes accrued by you will be disallowed
 

jamescg1972

Active Member
Snerkler did it for me. Cracking car!
 

Marika

Well-known Member
Congrats, Toby 🙂 When I saw the theme, I said to hubby’a panning shot of a race car is going to win’. I think I also named who would take it. Yeah, I might be a witch 🧙🏻‍♀️
 

shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Congrats. Toby :)

Jim
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
Around setup and how you actually pan to get the subject nice and sharp.

Thank you
Ok so the obvious thing is practice, it doesn’t happen overnight and don’t be afraid of wasting a lot of frames, that’s the beauty of digital.

I’m sure everyone had their own techniques here’s what I do.

Camera in manual mode, ISO set to base. If shooting through a fence I keep aperture as wide as possible to hide the fence the best I can, and I use ND filters if necessary to prevent having to stop down. I then start with a shutter speed of around 1/125 to get a few ‘bankers’ in and then start to reduce the shutter speed. Obviously the speed of the car will also dictate how much blur there is, for example shooting an F1 car at 180-200mph at 1/100 will give more blur than a classic car doing 90mph.

If and when you start to get down to the slower shutter speeds you won’t get all the car sharp unless it’s going perfectly perpendicular to you. If you shoot a car at a 3/4 angle and are down at say 1/25 the front of the car might be sharp but the rear blurred and vice versa. Therefore if I want a completely sharp car at a 3/4 angle I increase the shutter speed again. Also be aware that at slow shutter speeds it might not be “pin sharp” purely due to the vibrations of the car. Likewise with motorbike racing, if you use too slow a shutter speed the rider will probably be slightly blurred as they’re constantly moving around on the bike. Also, a shot doesn’t have to be pin sharp to work, this is one of the best I’ve taken (imo) and the car isn’t pin sharp

P6302247-Edit-Edit by TDG-77, on Flickr


What I find useful to do is use single point AF and then focus my eyes only on that point when panning. This way you can have the AF point say over the number of the car, or over a headlight etc and then you try and keep that AF point in exactly the same place on the car/bike as you pan. I find this works better for me than focussing on the whole frame and trying to keep the car in the same place within the frame (I hope this makes sense?).

Lighter lenses and shorter focal lengths are easier to pan at lower shutter speeds, especially if handholding. Some people use monopods but I don’t get on with them. That being said, the 100-400mm is starting to get tiring after a days shooting so next time I go I’m going to push myself to spend the day using a monopod to see if I can start to gel with it.

I’ve seen some people using tripods and gimbal heads which makes life easier but then it’s not as flexible.

If all else fails you can always ‘cheat’ like this ;) (shot at 1/320 with extra blur added to make it look more like circa 1/100)

P8246817-Edit by TDG-77, on Flickr
 

shotokan101

Distinguished Member
How about adding this as a section to the Beginners Guide?
 

sep8001

Well-known Member
Ok so the obvious thing is practice, it doesn’t happen overnight and don’t be afraid of wasting a lot of frames, that’s the beauty of digital.

I’m sure everyone had their own techniques here’s what I do.

Camera in manual mode, ISO set to base. If shooting through a fence I keep aperture as wide as possible to hide the fence the best I can, and I use ND filters if necessary to prevent having to stop down. I then start with a shutter speed of around 1/125 to get a few ‘bankers’ in and then start to reduce the shutter speed. Obviously the speed of the car will also dictate how much blur there is, for example shooting an F1 car at 180-200mph at 1/100 will give more blur than a classic car doing 90mph.

If and when you start to get down to the slower shutter speeds you won’t get all the car sharp unless it’s going perfectly perpendicular to you. If you shoot a car at a 3/4 angle and are down at say 1/25 the front of the car might be sharp but the rear blurred and vice versa. Therefore if I want a completely sharp car at a 3/4 angle I increase the shutter speed again. Also be aware that at slow shutter speeds it might not be “pin sharp” purely due to the vibrations of the car. Likewise with motorbike racing, if you use too slow a shutter speed the rider will probably be slightly blurred as they’re constantly moving around on the bike. Also, a shot doesn’t have to be pin sharp to work, this is one of the best I’ve taken (imo) and the car isn’t pin sharp

P6302247-Edit-Edit by TDG-77, on Flickr


What I find useful to do is use single point AF and then focus my eyes only on that point when panning. This way you can have the AF point say over the number of the car, or over a headlight etc and then you try and keep that AF point in exactly the same place on the car/bike as you pan. I find this works better for me than focussing on the whole frame and trying to keep the car in the same place within the frame (I hope this makes sense?).

Lighter lenses and shorter focal lengths are easier to pan at lower shutter speeds, especially if handholding. Some people use monopods but I don’t get on with them. That being said, the 100-400mm is starting to get tiring after a days shooting so next time I go I’m going to push myself to spend the day using a monopod to see if I can start to gel with it.

I’ve seen some people using tripods and gimbal heads which makes life easier but then it’s not as flexible.

If all else fails you can always ‘cheat’ like this ;) (shot at 1/320 with extra blur added to make it look more like circa 1/100)

P8246817-Edit by TDG-77, on Flickr
Thank you for a detailed reply. Need to have a play so may have to try and find somewhere to go and try out some panning.
 

shotokan101

Distinguished Member
Thank you for a detailed reply. Need to have a play so may have to try and find somewhere to go and try out some panning.
Local go karting us usually a good controlled environment to perhaps start with....
 

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