Job that works with computers.

chaddy

Banned
Hey peeps i need a bit of advice.
I'm looking for a job that works with computers.
Even tho i have no qualifications I'm very good with computers.
Been using them since i was 13 (now 22) have fixed and made hundreds of computers & use mine every day.
Also it doesn't seem to take long with me to learn something new with computers.
At the moment i don't have the ability to go and do a college course.
Don't have much time on my hands.
Don't drive.
Can't afford to go full time.
Can't afford to go part time.
Part time courses will take 2 years to complete and i probably know 80% of it as a few of my mates have done theres and still ask me for help with there PC's.
In the process of saving & moving out with my girlfriend.
So after looking around a few job sites I'm a bit lost with some of the IT jobs.
I have no coding experience but a bit of training and i think i could easily do it.
So for someone with me experience what jobs could i look at which include PC's.
 

chrisw

Well-known Member
I think the easiest way into this is in an IT helpdesk type environment - you may have to sit and answer calls for 6 months to begin with, and there will probably be opportunities to become an engineer to actually physically fix PCs, although many companies are now using remote control software to remotely fix issues.

But you may need qualifications to get some of these jobs... have a look at jobserve.com and search for IT Support or IT Helpdesk to see what's about and what skills / qualifications you need.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
I had no qualifications when i started in IT, and i wouldn't worry about it. It just means you have to start at the bottom, and work your way up. It may take a few years to get where you want, but who cares?

Helpdesk or junior role is your best bet, but pay is rubbish, £17-20k and thats in London, so i'd say £12-16k elsewhere in the country.
 

chaddy

Banned
mjn said:
I had no qualifications when i started in IT, and i wouldn't worry about it. It just means you have to start at the bottom, and work your way up. It may take a few years to get where you want, but who cares?

Helpdesk or junior role is your best bet, but pay is rubbish, £17-20k and thats in London, so i'd say £12-16k elsewhere in the country.
better then the £10.5k i'm on now.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
chaddy said:
better then the £10.5k i'm on now.
When i first started in IT, i was earning, £7.5k count yourself lucky ROFL
 

grey fox

Novice Member
Regarding employment the only advice I think I could give you would be voluntary work, to help you gain workplace experience.

On an educational level why not try studying for an A+ certification? Link
I think these certs can normally be gained in your own time, you only really need to purchase a couple of books if necessary, and there are loads of resources available to you on the web, many of them free.
 

BrianC

Novice Member
I'd think twice about going into IT at the moment, there is over supply for the majority of roles and this has greatly depressed salaries. It has also resulted in an increased number of qualified people going for the fewer jobs as a lot of the bigger IT shops have made redundancies over the last couple of years.

I'd predict the redundancies to increase over the next couple of years as more and more companies look to offshore IT. This is despite the rising costs of off shoring, I know people in India that have more than doubled their salaries with a single job move as the number of quality employees isn't as big as the size of the population in India would suggest. I guess off shoring to China is next on the agenda.

If you are looking to work at a small firm (less likely to be off shored) then I'd try (as suggested above) going in on a free trial basis, I've hired two people off the back of free trials so they can work really well. I'd also consider doing a HND or similar qualification part time - it'll show that you are making the effort to the employer.
 

DVD-Man

Well-known Member
Given your experience I suppose you would find the Comptia A+ Certification easy to achieve, do some home study with the Myers Book from Amazon then book the exam at your local test centre and then that backs up your hardware and OS knowledge, then decide where exactly you want to specialise.

Liam
 

rio1981

Well-known Member
I'd go along with what Brian is saying - I work for an IT / AV hybrid, and at least three companies have gone bust recently in our arena (Elonex, Bulletpoint and Tiger AV), with HP pulling out of the projector market also.

This is all relevant because of the convergence between IT and AV - and the industries are having to cope with how things are now... I don't think you'd want anyone to sugar-coat it for you, so I think it'll be difficult, but stick at it. :smashin:
 

chaddy

Banned
i like the idea of doing the A+ certification, so i think i will go in for it.
ARRGGGHHHHH just looked at the price £105.
Is there any material i can buy just to look over ?
 

chaddy

Banned
rio1981 said:
I'd go along with what Brian is saying - I work for an IT / AV hybrid, and at least three companies have gone bust recently in our arena (Elonex, Bulletpoint and Tiger AV), with HP pulling out of the projector market also.

This is all relevant because of the convergence between IT and AV - and the industries are having to cope with how things are now... I don't think you'd want anyone to sugar-coat it for you, so I think it'll be difficult, but stick at it. :smashin:
thanks mate, i know what you mean.
I wouldn't really care about what kind of IT job it is really, i just want to have a job that pays more then what i'm on now and for once be something that i enjoy doing. (ie working with computers.)
 

grey fox

Novice Member
You can try any of your local libraries on the offchance that they might have some books available, or get in touch with a local education establishment to see if they offer the A+ course. Actually signing up for a course might be a waste of money for you because of your experience, but question them on course content and the like.

If you want to purchase a book to get a feel of the exams, something like this book might help, Sybex titles are generally good quality so hopefully this will help.
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
A+ is definitely worth you doing, and is probably about the only IT qualification worth doing these days.... you 'buy' IT qualifications basically, which is why most MCSE's have never actually seen inside a computer...:rolleyes:

Driving license is a BIG issue too, if you're just starting out...



Whereabouts are you based?
 

MikeTV

Well-known Member
chaddy said:
I wouldn't really care about what kind of IT job it is really, i just want to have a job that pays more then what i'm on now and for once be something that i enjoy doing. (ie working with computers.)
I wouldn't say that at the interview! It sounds as though you only care amount money and an easy life :)

To cut costs, I'd look into buying the books second-hand, and then selling. Many people do this.

There are lots of different roles in the IT industry, and you wouldn't believe the number of people who think they "know a lot about" computers (eg. most of the people that use them every day). So it can be difficult to prove that you have any valuable skills - but qualifications are one way.

It is also important to have a clear idea what type of role you want, and then prove that you are taking steps in the right direction.

Once you start work in IT, you never stop learning, because it's always changing. You need to keep up, or get left behind and find yourself out of work. It's great fun, but it's not a walk in the park.
 

Uridium

Well-known Member
Also bear in mind that fixing up and building PC's at home and for you're mates is a different world entirely to "Corporate IT".

Not knocking you mate. good on you for trying to better yourself.

I used to be self employed doing a bit of this, bit of that etc.. managed to get a foot in the door as a trainee UNIX SA at a bank through a friend of a friend.

Been working in IT now for 12 years, always learning, always studying - at home and at work. as others have said it's not always an easy life and can only get worse as computers become easier to work on.

Anyone can walk in to a training centre and come out with an MCSE five days later, this is why the industry largely ignores them now. Gone are the days when you actually had to know something to get an MCSE.

As others have said the CompTIA A+ hardware and software books are well worth a read. These and a some Cisco qualifications will put you a step ahead of most interviewees but a driving license is a must as well.

A 1st line role or junior field engineer are both excellent starting points for an introduction to IT outside of the home.

Don't forget the software side though (although you would need to do a lot more studying), there is usually more of a gap in specialised software subjects but stay away from two a penny stuff like VB/SQL/Exchange
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
uridium said:
but a driving license is a must as well.
Got to disagree on this one, i haven't got a driving license, and it hasn't restricted me.

uridium said:
Don't forget the software side though (although you would need to do a lot more studying), there is usually more of a gap in specialised software subjects but stay away from two a penny stuff like VB/SQL/Exchange
Again, not entirely sure i agree with you here, SQL can be difficult to master, and you usually have to have a soft spot for sandals and beards :) but the pay is good, upto £70k.
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
I'd have to agree with Uridium really? if you're already doing SW then fine, but it's not the side of IT that you want to be starting out in these days..

Any Helpdesk/Domain Admin/AD/SQL/Oracle stuff can be done just as easily from a desk in Delhi, and at less than half the cost.... :thumbsdow


The HW side of things (particularly networking) is always gonna be there.

Installing kit, fixing servers, changing tapes, floor-walking and Network installation are a few of the only 'safe' areas of UK IT these days...?

The 'broadband revolution' means we'll all be going full-circle back to thin client/terminals in the next ten years.. multi-site firms will soon be gettting rid of PCs IMO. Quite a few local councils are already there.

Voice Over IP is the only place I'd be going if I was going to re-train...
 

chaddy

Banned
The Dude said:
A+ is definitely worth you doing, and is probably about the only IT qualification worth doing these days.... you 'buy' IT qualifications basically, which is why most MCSE's have never actually seen inside a computer...:rolleyes:

Driving license is a BIG issue too, if you're just starting out...



Whereabouts are you based?
Oldham
 

chaddy

Banned
points have been taken, you lot have been very helpful, i only wish now i had done all this when i left school.
 

BrianC

Novice Member
The Dude said:
The HW side of things (particularly networking) is always gonna be there.

Installing kit, fixing servers, changing tapes, floor-walking and Network installation are a few of the only 'safe' areas of UK IT these days...?

The 'broadband revolution' means we'll all be going full-circle back to thin client/terminals in the next ten years.. multi-site firms will soon be gettting rid of PCs IMO. Quite a few local councils are already there.

Voice Over IP is the only place I'd be going if I was going to re-train...
I don't think that the HW side for medium to large businesses is any safer (unless you're working for defence or similar) as we've been buying our boxes ready to plug in and go as they preload our standard build onto them for the last 8 or 9 years. We also do a similar thing with any routers or switches except they get configured centrally by us and then shipped out to the remote sites to be plugged in by BT or whoever. For some larger sites we have a third party that plugs things in for us but the guys doing the work don't get much above minimum wage.

Basicly anything other than structured cabling, backup tapes (most of the time we get a user at the site to do it for us) and training we do remotely.

I think IT is the thin edge of the wedge when it comes to off shoring as the vast majority of office jobs could be off shored without much effort. The question is who do the people in the retail and service industries sell to if all the office staff are in India.
 

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