Is this TV Knackered?

happeemonkee

Standard Member
Can any of you knowledgable folk help me with a problem. My auntie asked me to go to her house tonight to look at her tv. She said the colours had gone funny. It's a 28" Alba widescreen model and is just under 2 years old.

I took a picture (below) and as you can see the colours are all over the place. I told her I thought it was knackered but she has got a repair man coming out to look at it tomorrow. Has anyone got an idea what the problem is and whether it could be economically repaired? I told her I would go back tomorrow when the repair man is there. Any help would be appreciated.:smashin:
 

Attachments

Knyght_byte

Novice Member
if she has put some speakers next to it then this may be the cause, speakers without magnetic shielding will interfere with a TV and cause the colours to go haywire....if there are no speakers or any other electromagnetic equipment near it then the TV may just be what is technically known as knackered.....
 

GaryB

Distinguished Member
Looks like a purity error, though it seems much worse than usual. Could be caused by (in ascending order of cost):

1. Something magnetic near the TV, usually a speaker. This doesn't have to be in the room, it could be a neighbour the other side of an adjoining wall. To cure it, remove the source of the magnetism, switch the set off at the mains (not just to standby) for an hour and then switch back on. Can also happen if the set is moved and not switched off to allow it to degauss itself (caused by the Earth's magnetic field). Zero cost to fix.

2. Degauss coils in the set failed. They should demagnetise the set each time you switch on. That's the loud buzz you normally hear when a CRT set is first switched on. In practice, degauss coils hardly ever fail but the component that controls them, normally a posistor, sometimes does. Small cost to fix - callout plus a few pounds for the part if it's the posistor.

3. Detached shadowmask in the tube. Normally only happens if the set has been dropped but can happen naturally. Requires a new tube which will probably cost more than the set is worth.
 

happeemonkee

Standard Member
Thanks for the replies guys. There are definately no speakers near the set and the house is detatched so I guess it is down to either the degauss coils or the shadow mask then Gary. I'll see what the guy has to say today. Thanks again.
 

DRGL

Standard Member
Worth checking this-my mums old Sony did this once-she used to leave it in standby,since switching off at the switch it's never done it since. It was strange as the set used to degauss everytime from standby anyway(you couild hear it!) Worth checking.
 

happeemonkee

Standard Member
DRGL said:
Worth checking this-my mums old Sony did this once-she used to leave it in standby,since switching off at the switch it's never done it since. It was strange as the set used to degauss everytime from standby anyway(you couild hear it!) Worth checking.
She told me she turns it off at the mains every night mate so I don't think thats the problem. Thanks for the reply though.
 

happeemonkee

Standard Member
GaryB said:
Looks like a purity error, though it seems much worse than usual. Could be caused by (in ascending order of cost):

1. Something magnetic near the TV, usually a speaker. This doesn't have to be in the room, it could be a neighbour the other side of an adjoining wall. To cure it, remove the source of the magnetism, switch the set off at the mains (not just to standby) for an hour and then switch back on. Can also happen if the set is moved and not switched off to allow it to degauss itself (caused by the Earth's magnetic field). Zero cost to fix.

2. Degauss coils in the set failed. They should demagnetise the set each time you switch on. That's the loud buzz you normally hear when a CRT set is first switched on. In practice, degauss coils hardly ever fail but the component that controls them, normally a posistor, sometimes does. Small cost to fix - callout plus a few pounds for the part if it's the posistor.

3. Detached shadowmask in the tube. Normally only happens if the set has been dropped but can happen naturally. Requires a new tube which will probably cost more than the set is worth.

Hi Gary. Spot on mate. The guy said it was a purity fault. He spent about 20 minutes on it, fixed it and charged them £35 which my Auntie was happy with as she thought she would have to fork out for a new one.
Thanks for the advice Gary and all the other posters. It was appreciated.:smashin:
 

Similar threads

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Samsung HW-Q950T Soundbar Review, Filmmaker Mode, Disney+ $30 for Mulan, AV news and more
Top Bottom