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Is this technically possible?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by Flashman, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Flashman

    Flashman
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    I am the proud owner of a Toshiba 32WL46, which I bought last summer, as a "new" model.

    Not especially chuffed when 6 weeks later Tosh released the 48 model with HDMI and even less chuffed when I heard Sky were doing HD TV only via a digital connection.....

    Anyway, does anyone know if anyone manufacturers (or could?) a product that would take a digital HDCP signal via a HDMI output, i.e. from the forthcoming Sky box and convert it to be output into a lcd set with scart/component inputs and still get the hi-def signal? I know this would lose some of the quality.

    I'm reluctant to flog my set at a loss, when I've been really pleased with it's performance so far, but I really want hi-def tv when it comes out next year!!

    (I've viewed WMV clips from my PC and they look cracking!)

    Any ideas?
     
  2. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    The simple answer to this is no and any company trying this would be in breach of copyright laws. Samsung did have a hackable version of their HD945 I believe which allowed HDCP to be turned off thus allowing HDCP encrypted material to be transmitted to a non-HDCP device but they took it off the market after serious industry pressure and possibl lawsuits.
     
  3. Flashman

    Flashman
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    Thanks for that, I didn't consider that aspect. It's pretty annoying for "law abiding" people that simply want to enjoy hi-def but are denied by the rapid advance of technology and I suspect I am one of many that in effect has bought a technological turkey......

    And to think I held off for sooo long before buying the one I did, months of magazine reading/visits to dealers and going through the plasma/lcd debate initially and it still has done me no favours.

    Ah well, anyone want to buy a turkey?!
     
  4. loz

    loz
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    The more complicated answer is we don't know yet.

    It isn't going to be beyond man's inginuity to build such a device, but whether the powers that be allow it to survive in the marketplace is a another question. No mainstream manufacturer is going to produce one for sure, but as for back street Chinese electronics companies? Who knows?

    Let's face it, the powers that be haven't really stopped manufacturers and consumers bypassing DVD region coding, macrovision, or DVD encryption. Even though they are relatively weak mechanisms, if pursueing them through law was all that was needed they would have shut these bypassing mechanisms down by now. But they haven't

    However, this time around it seems like the industry is going to make a more concerted effort to stop the flood gates opening, rather than try to shut the stable door after the horse as bolted.

    So I wouldn't be holding my breath. Cut your loses now, next year once HD is out and folks are more aware of HDCP you will have a hard job selling it at any sort of decent price.
     
  5. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    Noooooooooooooo ! I was going to get one of these or the 745. Has the 745 been taken off ?
     
  6. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    Don't quote me on this but I'm sure I read something about this on a thread on of this forum. It only applies to the "hackable" version though, the normal 745/945 should still be available.
     
  7. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    I thought all versions were hackable ?
     
  8. Liam @ Prog AV

    Liam @ Prog AV
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    I have seen a box recieve a DVI HDCP signal and send out a DVI non-HDCP signal. I have also seen a box receive a DVI signal (non-HDCP) and send out an analogue RGB or YUV signal of the same high resolution. Expensive, illegal, but doable.

    As a bit of a stab in the dark I am half confident that a decent "hack" will be available simply because of all the people who have non-HDCP displays who will want to get into HDTV. The problem is without industry support (since it will be illegal) will such a decive actually be any good and what happens when it goes wrong!!

    Flashman unless you intend on jumping right on the HDTV bandwagon I wouldn't be too worried. It's due in early 2006 for the footy, and that will be about all the HD material they'll have!! It'll be expensive to buy, expensive to subscribe too, and 95% of what you will watch will be no better than standard Sky Digital. Same for HD-DVD, it'll be out soon but the early players will be way up in the high-end level, with few titles available to buy just now. I know no-one wants to be buying a new telly every year or two, but it is quite feasilbe that by the time you decide to go HD, you will also be going for a new even higher resolution, even better picture display that cost half what your current one does! Or not. But worth thinking about...
     
  9. mickbarlow

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    sounds interesting, in an purely educational sort way of course!

    any links?
     
  10. Liam @ Prog AV

    Liam @ Prog AV
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    Haven't a link, and it's not advertised as such anyway. Basically it's a DVI distribution amp that has now been discontinued again!!! Not sure if we have any left now but the point is that it was possible quite easily it seems. I think it was more a mistake on the implementation done by the manufacturer than an intention to strip HDCP (which would explain it's discontinuation). I wouldn't be surprised if someone released a DVI/HDMI-analogue YUV box that did the job once HDTV lands.
     
  11. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Until the secret device key gets placed on the revocation list and is effectively disabled. Someone did however ask about spoofing the secret device key of a known device and using that in an illegal hack. Not good if you have the legitimate display and it gets disabled too.

    Technically though, the secret key should be tamper proof and as such unobtainable in its own right - there are actually 40 or so keys per device so just the one is not enough. The only known true hack attempt, rather than a manufacturers bad implementation, is by a Dutch cryptographer who says that he has theoritically hacked the master key used to generate all secret keys and thus be able to generate any HDCP key that he wants. The only floor with his plan is that he thinks he knows how to do it but someone needs to check his work for errors which he refuses to distribute as he doesn't want to be arrested. In addition, it would take 'n' high end computers running continuously for 2 weeks (no big deal) and from what I recall, 40 HDCP compliant display devices.
     
  12. mickbarlow

    mickbarlow
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    that depends whether 'n' is 1 or 1,000,000 :)
     

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