1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Is there any benefit in using S-VHS tapes with a VHS VCR ?

Discussion in 'Digital TV & Video Players & Recorders' started by DNA, Dec 12, 2001.

Tags:
  1. DNA

    DNA
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I used to think the performance of my Philips VCR was ok.

    Since I've added an AV amp, play back through the amp can be very crackly - I guess the amp is just amplifying the noise as well as the good stuff.

    Is there any advantage in trying the higher quality S-VHS tapes or will I need to swap the VCR for a S-VHS VCR.

    Cheers.

    D.
     
  2. Garrett

    Garrett
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2001
    Messages:
    32,371
    Products Owned:
    2
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Location:
    The best thief you’ll never see.
    Ratings:
    +4,238
    As far as I know, S-VHS are the best quality tapes you can get, I read on this forum some people do use them on non S-VHS machines. The problem you are having may just be your machine. The sound quality should be the same on S-VHS as normal machines, S-VHS is for better pictures (I will stand being corrected on this).
    You haven’t by any chance got you video playing mono track only, as this will give poor play back. Also as time goes by your machine tracking can go out, so just try altering the tracking a bit to see if this works.
    I use my machine with normal tape for taping a 2 hour program whilst I’m out one day a week and the sound quality is more or less as the original, from good quality broadcast. I would even say better than cassettes, and this is with normal tape and audio video taping is vastly under rated. Just think 4/8 hours recording for the price of a video. Only it's a bit of a sod playing them in the car.
    Lastly you can pick a S-VHS machine up now for around £200, not bad.


    :cool: Ruby quartz shades.
     
  3. mart.stokes

    mart.stokes
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I go along with this.

    S-VHS tapes are good quality and therefore MAY give better sound but it does sound like something more sinister is happening. VHS sound is bloody good given the vintage. As well as the mono check suggested by Garrett have you tried just adjusting the tracking very slightly? It does affect the sound if the tracking is very slightly out and it can sound "rough".
     
  4. bxd

    bxd
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2001
    Messages:
    1,482
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Southampton
    Ratings:
    +136
    DNA,

    A couple of suggestions :

    I hate to suggest it... but is your vcr a Hi-Fi one ?

    If it isn't and you're only getting the mono edge track, then I'm not surprised that your audio isn't very clever.

    On the other hand, it could be a problem with the amp or cables. Is the problem just with the vcr or do you get it with a stereo input from the tv (or Sky) ? Try changing some of the cables around between equipment and see what that does.

    You should be getting pretty good audio with regular good quality vhs tapes. It's also possible that your vcr might needs a head clean.

    brian.
     
  5. Garrett

    Garrett
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2001
    Messages:
    32,371
    Products Owned:
    2
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Location:
    The best thief you’ll never see.
    Ratings:
    +4,238
    Hi Mart
    What I was really tying to say, S-VHS format as far as I know is not an upgrade in sound quality but in video quality. If he puts a better quality tape in the machine, as with ordinary tape decks you will get a better recording, but that is only up to the limit of the deck. If the deck is of poor quality putting better tapes in is just a waste of time.

    By the way DNA what do you mean by OK? do you mean good or passable?

    :cool: Ruby quartz shades.
     
  6. mart.stokes

    mart.stokes
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Sorry Garrett, it was a bad post on my part. What I meant was "I go along with what Garrett says".
     
  7. DNA

    DNA
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks very much for the suggestions, I think you may be right - the problem may be something other than the media.

    The VCR is a pretty good model, or at least it was it was a couple of years ago and has recently been serviced, so the alignment/heads etc should be ok.

    Strangely, I would describe the picture using normal VHS tapes as excellent so, maybe you are right - the fact that I feel the audio is sub-standard points to a problem with the recording of the sound track. I don't think it can be cabling as I get the same result whether the audio is connected directly to the av amp or via the tv scart.

    As regards whether the VCR is only recording in mono - it should'nt be, it is certainly capable of digital/stereo, however that is a distinct possibility. I'm not sure I now how to verify that other than putting my head up against the speakers but I'm off to check that right now

    I will post my findings.

    DNA
     
  8. Garrett

    Garrett
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2001
    Messages:
    32,371
    Products Owned:
    2
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Location:
    The best thief you’ll never see.
    Ratings:
    +4,238
    Hi Mart T
    No sweat, I wasn’t 100% clear, I’m not a great wordsmith.

    DNA
    There must be a way to switch between stereo and mono on your machine surely. I always thought, (could be wrong ) but you can even switch on or of on individual channels. Does your machine show the level meters or can you go into a menu to alter the different levels, then switch them back on.

    A trick to check if it receding in stereo is to record using your audio inputs, use the selector for recording off them inputs, and just use your right lead for a minute, then pull it out and use the left lead. Then replay. Does the sound come out one side then the other?

    :cool: Ruby quartz shades.
     
  9. DNA

    DNA
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    :) I think I am making progress with this.

    My VCR is definitely receiving NICAM stereo programs.

    I have studied the Philips user manual again and discovered the following:

    It appears that my VCR can record audio on three separate sound tracks HIFI L, HIFI R and NORM(used for dubbing I believe).

    You can select these tracks individually or combine them during record/playback.

    I suspect I have been recording using only the two HIFI tracks (L&R) and somehow playing back using all 3, so playing back a blank track as well as the HIFI tracks - hence the bad quality.

    This is speculation at this point and I am still experimenting with the setup to try and prove or dis-prove my theory.

    Does this sound a plausible explanation ?

    Thanks again guys for pointing me in the right direction, I will keep you informed of the results.

    DNA.
     
  10. sraper

    sraper
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2001
    Messages:
    534
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Watford, UK
    Ratings:
    +90
    well the NORM track is the MONO edge track and therefore if you MIX it with the stereo tracks it is going to affect the sound.

    My panny vvcr has the option of L+R, L, R, MONO or MIX!!! which is supposed to be used if you have done any dubbing. This way you can hear the original soundtrack + any dubbed sound.
     
  11. Garrett

    Garrett
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2001
    Messages:
    32,371
    Products Owned:
    2
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Location:
    The best thief you’ll never see.
    Ratings:
    +4,238
    When recording in stereo, the machine tapes two tracks in your terminology HIFI L, HIFI R, in a helix pattern on you tape along side you picture, it also tapes a mono track along the bottom in a straight line. It will always tape this mono track (generally a combination of the other two), but not necessary record the stereo ones(as these can be switches off). On play back your machine will play the stereo track unless you switch them off, then it de-faults to the mono track, the mono track is generally of poor quality, but should not be heard unless the other tracks are switched off.
    If you dub the sound track of a tape, you cannot over write the stereo track, only the mono track on the bottom.
    I use to have a machine that was brought out just before NICAM broadcast and had simulcast, (it was also was NICAM) this was so if there was a stereo concert on TV and on the radio at the same time you could tell it to tape the picture off TV but tape the stereo off the radio. This was a great facility as I could go out tape a stereo radio program, and tape a program off TV at the same time. Come back listen to the radio program, switch the HIFI L, HIFI R tracks off, then watch the TV program, albeit rubbish sound quality. If it played all three tracks at the same time I would be getting the TV program whilst listening the radio recording.
    Try playing the video and individually switching each track off and listen to the sound quality.

    Hope this make sense and helps.

    :cool: Ruby quartz shades.
     

Share This Page

Loading...