Is there a way to block Roblox on Windows 10?

iqoniq

Active Member
I did a reinstall and OS upgrade (8 > 10) of a laptop an OLD laptop week or two ago for a friend's 7 y/o child (the laptop is older than he is). When I was passed the laptop my friend said he didn't want him to be able to install anything (when I booted up the laptop it was carnage), and also told not to install Roblox as there had been issues regarding it. There was also the fact that the machine really can't handle it and the fans sounded like my freestanding fan on gale force setting when it was running. I got a call last night to say that I'd left him with admin access because he'd managed to install Roblox. I knew he only had a standard user on there because I always test by trying to install something and it passed that check. I double checked whether he had it on the laptop or whether it was running in Geforce Now which was installed so the machine could run Fortnite without it melting, but it was on the machine.

My first thought was he'd found some way to get admin access. The problem is the machine had a fingerprint scanner, which wasn't used previously, and I only found by accident and got it working, so decided to use it to my advantage. The admin account had a random 16 character password, a random 8 digit pin, and then my friend and his partner's fingerprints to unlock the admin account. I was asked to keep hold of the login details for if they ever needed them, and they'd stick with the fingerprint scanner to log in. I know it's not 100% secure, but it was enough to deter the attempts of 7 y/o.

After some research, it appears that Roblox is written in Java. As a side effect (possibly intentional by the devs?), this means that it can run without tripping the UAC in Windows. I can't think of a way of stopping this, although I rarely bother with limiting access to programs in non-standard ways, so there may be a way.

I don't want to start butchering an install, installing NetNanny type stuff (they're written like root kits and near impossible to completely remove), or anything overly complicated that may need to be undone at some point. My initial thought is to add some entries to the host file, with the Roblox URLs and IP addresses pointing to 127.0.0.1 which would at least stop him from accessing the website, and hopefully the app from being able to connect. It's relatively painless, and I can talk my friend through undoing it over the phone.

Does anyone have any other suggestions? I won't be able to access the machine until Saturday, but it would be great if I had a few ideas I could try out.

Thanks in advance.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
Many routers these days have a URL filter/firewall, just block roblox domain and he cannot access it from any device on the network.
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
I agree with @next010 but you may not have access to their router or they may not want you making changes there.

This discussion has come up in the forum many times and to save rehashing old posts HERE is a link to the most recent I can recall where I provide a solution that could suit you, (about half way down page 2 if you don't want to go through the whole thing)

However! Given it is just Roblox you need to block (for now) I would personally just add a windows firewall rule for Roblox executable since this is very easy to do and would require Admin rights to configure so would be difficult for him to bypass.
 

iqoniq

Active Member
Many routers these days have a URL filter/firewall, just block roblox domain and he cannot access it from any device on the network.
Blocking it network wide isn't really an option. He is allowed controlled and supervised access on a desktop machine, but he's not allowed it on demand as he started to get addicted to it and throwing tantrums if he couldn't spend every waking minute on it. That would end up in a situation where it was being constantly blocked and unblocked. I actually suggested MAC blocking the machine at the router as a weapon of last resort, or setting up a schedule of hours it can have access, but that still doesn't help the torture being inflicted on the machine by it attempting to run something it has no business with, although 10/10 for effort.

I'll probably go with the firewall rule (I keep forgetting about Windows firewall), and see if I can do anything with BitDefender's application rules (I've got a load of spare keys and don't mind donating one as I can revoke them as well), and block the website for good measure. I think the problem is my friend isn't great with computers, and while I didn't mind doing the upgrade, I don't want to be tech support when I don't have easy access to the machine (I'm not comfortable about being responsible for the admin details, but they've been dumped in "the vault" so I don't need to worry about them too much).
 

next010

Distinguished Member
Anydesk is useful if they trust you to do remote work and not have to explain over the phone.

One other simple thing you could do is block roblox website via adblocker in web browser, install ublock origin in all the installed web browsers, block the domain and hide all of the ublock icons and elements.

Not sure if standard users can disable extensions in browser or not so he might figure it out in time or find the ublock controls.
 

strangely tim

Well-known Member
Bit of parenting would work, tell the child they cannot use Roblox, its the simple solution.
 

lowmans100

Well-known Member
set up the child accounts using Microsoft Family then you can set screen time limits, app and game limits and monitor activity on the account.

you can install it as an app on mobile devices as well.
 

strangely tim

Well-known Member
set up the child accounts using Microsoft Family then you can set screen time limits, app and game limits and monitor activity on the account.

you can install it as an app on mobile devices as well.
Or just say no, you can't play 'whatever' that way a young child learns there are consequences to their actions, a valuable lesson when growing up.
 

Tempest

Member
If they are caught playing it by parents, give them a slap, then they'll learn ;)
It worked for 6 million years of human evolution up till the last 20 ish.... :D

 

jimscreechy

Active Member
hehe I did have a good laugh at that one :laugh::laugh: though I have to admit feeling a little guilty at the PC questionability that has been drummed into me.
 

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