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Is there a right time to leave a job?

So, I've been at my currently employer for 11 years now and I started off as an agency worker, I am currently a shift team leader and the only other routes for progression are warehouse team leader and warehouse manager. Both roles are currently occupied and won't be available for many years.

My boss tells me how good I amij comparison to the other shift team leader etc, I feel he just says this to massage people's egos. Anyway, I want to do more, want to earn more etc. I don't think this is going to happen here, I work shifts so one week 6-2 and the other 2-10, however for the past year I've been doing 6-2 and 8-8 as they needed me and I also enjoyed the overtime money plus I'm not a fan of working till 10pm or wasn't until doing 8-8 for a year. That's now coming to a end and I suggested doing 12-8 as they hadn't had me here till 10 for a year so it seems I'm not really needed and could do other things on a 12-8 but they flatly refused and said stick to your shifts.

Anyway, my question is how do you know when the right time to leave a job for a new job is or even if the job your going to will be better then what your at now? My current job offers 30 days holiday plus bank holidays, pays 8% into my pension, full sick pay, decent money plus overtime when available. Last year I earned 35k, my basic is around 25k.

Job I applied for and have an interview for is 30k, 4 day weeks from Jan-Sept then 5 day weeks after that as its their busy period. They offer 20 days holiday, don't mention sick pay but do mention just a pension.

I think because I've been at my current employer for 11 years and had zero issues or zero issues relating to job stability, would it be wise to jump ship or to progress, is that what I need to do......

This job interview might be a load of nonsense but it tells me I can get interviews elsewhere.
 

blue max

Distinguished Member
Can't really advise on your specific circumstances - only you really know, but I'd strongly advise getting another job before quitting your existing one. And I'd also wait until this brexit thing is out of the way too. You may find it impacts companies in ways that they didn't expect.
 

lowmans100

Well-known Member
You leave when you are not getting what you want out of the job, whatever that may be.
Reading your post you have hit a dead end wrt to promotion, you will soon not be working the hours that suit you and you will be earning less as you are losing overtime.

If a new post or role is available that ticks the above boxes and meets your immediate need for advancement and has comparable or better reward/benefits then why not move on. You can never know if moving is best until you actually move.

When you become part of the furniture your employer is probably less likely to make much of an effort to positively advance you if they believe you will not move on IMO.
 

DemonAV

Distinguished Member
I think about quitting my job every few months or so but then I think...I'm earning 34000 a year, it's a doss to be honest and I have a company car (that I pay tax on).
At the end of the day though it's so bloody boring it drives me up the wall. On balance it's a worth staying as I have my pension etc but every so often I wanna get out of there.
 
Can't really advise on your specific circumstances - only you really know, but I'd strongly advise getting another job before quitting your existing one. And I'd also wait until this brexit thing is out of the way too. You may find it impacts companies in ways that they didn't expect.
Never really thought about the brexit side of things but good point. Would you be concerned if the company was global but their uk subsidiary showed lower turnover, debt, poor credit etc. Or is that how companies work?
 
You leave when you are not getting what you want out of the job, whatever that may be.
Reading your post you have hit a dead end wrt to promotion, you will soon not be working the hours that suit you and you will be earning less as you are losing overtime.

If a new post or role is available that ticks the above boxes and meets your immediate need for advancement and has comparable or better reward/benefits then why not move on. You can never know if moving is best until you actually move.

When you become part of the furniture your employer is probably less likely to make much of an effort to positively advance you if they believe you will not move on IMO.
Nail on the head re some points, the overtime is not so much an issue, it's more the working hours for me. Genuinely don't like waiting till 2pm to start work and finish at 10. Atthe same time I want to earn more and achieve more but don't want to jump ship for a sidestep but more money.
 
I think about quitting my job every few months or so but then I think...I'm earning 34000 a year, it's a doss to be honest and I have a company car (that I pay tax on).
At the end of the day though it's so bloody boring it drives me up the wall. On balance it's a worth staying as I have my pension etc but every so often I wanna get out of there.
Sounds like me, job is a doddle, can do it with my eyes closed, don't get any hassle, can do as I please within reason. Have a great time around me, comfortable in terms of the earnings just dnt see any progression or money increases.
 

Gingerbeard

Active Member
I disagree about the whole brexit thing - the world will keep spinning, businesses will keep going and jobs will keep being created. If you worried and waited about brexit you may never move on!

Utlimately it is up to you and what you feel is right. The longer you stay somewhere where you are unfulfilled the more miserable you are likely to become and this will most definitely impact on your mental health - it's just not worth it!

So to me, you sound like you know what you want to do, you just need to take the next step. This is always the toughest part but once done I doubt you'll look back

Best of luck

Gingerbeard
 

DOBLY

Well-known Member
^ agree, but do some research on the new place - if their business model is reliant on one particular set of circumstances that will be severely impacted by a big change, then perhaps they are not for you in the long term.
Another thing to do is to tell your current boss that you want to do more, earn more etc. They might be able to shift things/people round so that you get a more interesting/rewarding role and they don't have to incur the costs involved in hiring someone to replace you.
 

wongataa

Well-known Member
I disagree about the whole brexit thing - the world will keep spinning, businesses will keep going and jobs will keep being created.
In general this is true but specific companies could be be badly affected. Which ones may or may not be no-one really knows and depending on what sort of job you may be looking for it could affect who you would consider applying for.
 
Well we shall find out tomorrow as thats when the interview is. I'm sure I'll know if and when the time is right and also response from my current employer as to what they think of me currently.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Ironically the best time to leave a company is when you are relatively happy in your current job. I'm talking from a career progression point of view.

Because when you go into interviews you are not stressed and desperate. You will therefore interview better and you can look at new roles more objectively. You will be more comfortable in asking for more because you are not desperate to get this job. You will come across as more confident without any bitterness or baggage.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
Digging up an old thread here but as it happened i obviously didn't get this job in the end. They deemed I didn't quite have the right experience. However today they emailed and rang me asking my current position and if I was still interested in available roles. Obviously I am so they are firing over some details about a team leader role they think is be suited too.
 

Miss Mandy

Moderator
I think you just know when it's time to move on. I'm just hitting that point now.
Been in the same job for 8 years and love the actual job, but I'm fed up with the politics of the department and lack of potential progression. My salary is around £16k, but I'm at the top of my pay band so no chance of any increase.
The main reason I've stayed here is convenience, its only a 10 minute walk to work and I get all the school holidays off.
 
I think you just know when it's time to move on. I'm just hitting that point now.
Been in the same job for 8 years and love the actual job, but I'm fed up with the politics of the department and lack of potential progression. My salary is around £16k, but I'm at the top of my pay band so no chance of any increase.
The main reason I've stayed here is convenience, its only a 10 minute walk to work and I get all the school holidays off.
Sounds exactly like my predicament. 15 min drive to work, outside of the usual heavy traffic, no motorways etc. Been here 12 years in May, can't see any progression routes however the money, holidays and other benefits are what keep me here. Ims struggling to find a role where I can earn what I do, have 30 days holiday per year plus bank holidays, have 4 months full sick pay if ever needed and they pay 8% into my pension.
 

cR4cKF0x 5TevE

Well-known Member
In my experience, you need to leave when you start resenting it: whether your boss, your colleagues, the work itself or the hours.

If you stay 'because it's easier' or "it's hard to find something else" it becomes a vicious cycle.

I've outstayed my welcome a couple of times, the worst example being when I accepted a 'counter offer' when I'd found another job: my advice in those circumstances is to go, the reasons you wanted to leave will still be there and you will end up resenting it even more.
 

Kailash

Well-known Member
i'm in the same boat kind of. good holidays, sick pay, can work from home etc
there is just no job progression and no chance to earn extra money. i asked about a pay rise but it was shrugged off. the job is boring now and i'd like to do something else.
everything i look at the conditions are not quite as good and it's all very specific experience employers want. i've had several interviews over the years but no offers at all. gets disheartening for sure.
it will be hard for me to get out of this but i just try and tell myself it's money coming in.
not going to give up completely just yet though :p
if you can get offered something close to the conditions you are on but with the benefit of betters hrs it would be worth going for it. you'll just have to draw up your pros and cons table
 

cR4cKF0x 5TevE

Well-known Member
i'm in the same boat kind of. good holidays, sick pay, can work from home etc
there is just no job progression and no chance to earn extra money. i asked about a pay rise but it was shrugged off. the job is boring now and i'd like to do something else.
everything i look at the conditions are not quite as good and it's all very specific experience employers want. i've had several interviews over the years but no offers at all. gets disheartening for sure.
it will be hard for me to get out of this but i just try and tell myself it's money coming in.
not going to give up completely just yet though :p
if you can get offered something close to the conditions you are on but with the benefit of betters hrs it would be worth going for it. you'll just have to draw up your pros and cons table
Often just changing gives you a boost, the first few weeks when you know nothing and no one can be daunting but they don't know your weak (or good) points so you have the chance to shape the job as you want.
Be aware you have to want the change: if you are going through the motions it's usually obvious during the interview process. I usually notice it where answers to questions are clichéd (the usual crap like "it's all about relationships", "I like to be collegiate", and minimal 'passion' is displayed.
I ask a lot of non work questions to gauge personality - I like people with an edge / prepared to challenge and this is quite well displayed with answers to questions like:

"you are in a lift with your hero/heroine", who is it, what would you say to them, and why?
Or, you can have dinner with 3 famous people, who and why?

I particularly like the ones who ask me how I would answer.
 

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