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Is the NAD T758 just Not very good?

BewdyByson

Standard Member
I did a lot of research on a replacement av amp for my Sony DA3500ES. The NAD seemed like a good upgrade. The problem is, I’m on my second one now in three weeks and I’m seriously unimpressed. The sound is fine, great in fact. But that’s where it ends.

It seems as though this amp was created and never tested. The AV implementation in my experience is terrible, flawed and simply doesn’t work as it should. And the WiFi streaming capabilities are crudely implemented and very flakey.

On my first unit, spotify was hit and miss, and this second unit I can’t get WiFi to connect at all no matter what I do.

Both units have issues with ARC which I can’t get to the bottom of. And quite frankly at £1k having already spent hours with the unit I can’t be bothered wasting anymore time on it.

For a product whose primary purpose is to connect a multitude of devices, these elements should
work flawlessly. But I’m finding the opposite. Curiously for an amp which is at V3 you’d think all the issues would be ironed out. It feel like the unit is still in beta!

Furthermore, the NAD support has been absolutely awful.

Very poor NAD must do better.
 

Rambles

Distinguished Member
Strange, there are a lot of owners of that AVR that seem very happy with it. You might try posting in the dedicated thread about your particular issues to see if there are known fixes / workarounds:


I had a Sony 3500ES many amps a go. In fact, I think it's still around somewhere, I kept it as a spare. Currently I am using an Arcam AVR550 in my main room. Not perfect, but sounds fantastic, and has been reliable for several months.

A £1k budget on an AVR isn't considered large these days, I'm afraid.
 

BewdyByson

Standard Member
Strange, there are a lot of owners of that AVR that seem very happy with it. You might try posting in the dedicated thread about your particular issues to see if there are known fixes / workarounds:


I had a Sony 3500ES many amps a go. In fact, I think it's still around somewhere, I kept it as a spare. Currently I am using an Arcam AVR550 in my main room. Not perfect, but sounds fantastic, and has been reliable for several months.

A £1k budget on an AVR isn't considered large these days, I'm afraid.
thanks for the reply. I have already spent a fair amount of time on the owners thread with little success. I’m sure there must be owners out there who like this device, but my own experience of the amp is very negative.

It’s funny you say £1k is not a lot to spend on an amp, obviously the sky is the limit with audio gear, but I personally think for that sort of money an electronic piece of equipment should work well. NAD are not some bedroom operation. There are amps that cost a third of that which perform consistently well and sound perfectly fine.
 

Rambles

Distinguished Member
It’s funny you say £1k is not a lot to spend on an amp, obviously the sky is the limit with audio gear, but I personally think for that sort of money an electronic piece of equipment should work well. NAD are not some bedroom operation. There are amps that cost a third of that which perform consistently well and sound perfectly fine.
That is true, and if you are looking for perfectly fine, then buy one of those :)

Since my Sony 3500ES, in my main room I have tried a Yamaha RXA810, Cambridge Audio CXR200, Denon 6300, Marantz SR7011, and Denon 4400 with a Musical Fidelity integrated amp.

The Cambridge and the Arcam sound excellent, they provide a consistent wow factor, and made the system really enjoyable to listen to. However, the Cambridge had too many firmware issues, that I couldn't live with it. I had a buzz with the Denon 6300 and a faulty speaker terminal with the Marantz. The Yamaha and the other Denon worked fine, but sounded meh.

Even the Arcam isn't perfect, I have had to make a few compromises, but it is very liveable with now I have got it configured to my liking, and sounds excellent, I very much enjoy using that system.

I am not saying that this state of affairs is correct, but it does seem to be the state of play at present. Maybe something new will hit the market that works perfectly, sounds excellent, with plenty of power, great room correction, all the features you could ever want, and is affordable.

Probably not o_O
 

BewdyByson

Standard Member
Ultimately it comes down to this. These are luxury items, so if the product doesn't enrich your life and one spends more time trying to fix it, than listening to it, then it is no good!

The NAD is going back. Maybe I'll consider a cheaper AV amp with some pre-outs that I can hook up to a decent power amp.
 

Rambles

Distinguished Member
Ultimately it comes down to this. These are luxury items, so if the product doesn't enrich your life and one spends more time trying to fix it, than listening to it, then it is no good!
It seems like you are looking for a plug and play AVR, in which case you might want to stay clear of Dirac. Dirac is excellent for correcting any negative effects on the audio that your room creates, but you do need to put in some hours to get the very best from it.

Or, you could get a professional in to set it all up for you.

Lots of users on these forums, very much enjoy tinkering with their systems and trying different things to eke out the best possible audio.

You could spend your money on a more plug and play amp, install it and forget about it, if that is more important to you than getting the best possible sound.
 

BewdyByson

Standard Member
I’m actually a qualified sound engineer! So I know my way around audio gear, so it’s all the more frustrating when a product doesn’t live up to expectations. My understanding of ARC configure is that it is supposed to be pretty much plug and play. There’s only so many settings and I tried them all with this amp.

I quite enjoy getting the best out of the sound of my gear (I even tinker with speaking building), but I don’t enjoy debugging a piece of gear with dodgy half arsed implementation. I didn’t even get as far as getting Dirac up and running, as what’s the point if the thing doesn’t switch on remotely, or find an audio signal when it is switched on!
 

Rambles

Distinguished Member
My understanding of ARC configure is that it is supposed to be pretty much plug and play.
ARC (as in Audio Return Channel rather than Anthem Room Correction!) is notoriously buggy. It relies on each manufacturer of TV's and amps to implement it in a way that allows cross communication. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. This is why enhanced ARC (eARC) is being rolled out on newer devices.

I quite enjoy getting the best out of the sound of my gear (I even tinker with speaking building), but I don’t enjoy debugging a piece of gear with dodgy half arsed implementation. I didn’t even get as far as getting Dirac up and running, as what’s the point if the thing doesn’t switch on remotely, or find an audio signal when it is switched on!
Shame. You might have enjoyed tinkering with Dirac.

The not switching on remotely thing sounds odd, were the batteries in the remote okay?

Not finding the signal could be an HDMI cabling issue. Or, maybe you just had a faulty unit?
 

BewdyByson

Standard Member
It's definitely not a remote control battery issue, and I've used enough cables now to rule that out.

The amp intermittently switches on and off with the TV power on and off, then sometimes doesn't. And if I change source on the amp the HDMI signal goes, never to return without a full power cycle. The irritating thing is there is no setting on the amp anywhere to manually override the input to bring it back into HDMI ARC input mode, it has to be powered down to get the signal back. Basically, no amount of tinkering I think will solve the issues, there's a compatibility problem I think with my TV. Who knows, maybe the TV is largely at fault? Unfortunately I don't have the luxury of another one to try and I can't send the TV back now.

I really like the principle of Dirac, which is one of the primary reasons why I went for the NAD. But at the end of the day, it is simply a means of adding eq (and phase shifting) to improve frequency response of a speaker/room system, this sort of dynamic room 'tuning' has been a staple part of any live sound engineering to reduce feedback and resonant frequencies for a long time. Nothing to get too excited about!
 

gibbsy

Moderator
ARC, or rather CEC, is often the root of many problems with connected equipment. There was a member who was having trouble with his Pioneer LX800 not playing SACD multi channel, then when it did get going only to stop in the middle of the album. The LX800 is not a cheap investment having an outlay of £2000.

I suggested that he turns off CEC on his TV and receiver. Guess what. Problem solved. I've long given up on it and I have the simplest of set ups. Now I sit there with a plethora of remotes when I want to use my set up. At least everything works as it should.
 

Rambles

Distinguished Member
I really like the principle of Dirac, which is one of the primary reasons why I went for the NAD. But at the end of the day, it is simply a means of adding eq (and phase shifting) to improve frequency response of a speaker/room system, this sort of dynamic room 'tuning' has been a staple part of any live sound engineering to reduce feedback and resonant frequencies for a long time. Nothing to get too excited about!
Well, isn't it exciting to have the option to implement that correction within your living room?!

Plus many other room correction systems don't do it very well, or add artefacts to the sound, this has been my experience with Audyssey and YPAO, the latter seemingly did nothing actually!

Dirac resolves some small issues that I have with my room, and brings the soundtage together to make it exceptionally expansive.

That is exciting to me :)

The other issue with ARC is that you could abandon it and switch to optical instead, although you would lose DD+. Or, use a different source to access your content, not your TV.
 

kahlua

Well-known Member
It's definitely not a remote control battery issue, and I've used enough cables now to rule that out.

The amp intermittently switches on and off with the TV power on and off, then sometimes doesn't. And if I change source on the amp the HDMI signal goes, never to return without a full power cycle. The irritating thing is there is no setting on the amp anywhere to manually override the input to bring it back into HDMI ARC input mode, it has to be powered down to get the signal back. Basically, no amount of tinkering I think will solve the issues, there's a compatibility problem I think with my TV. Who knows, maybe the TV is largely at fault? Unfortunately I don't have the luxury of another one to try and I can't send the TV back now.

I really like the principle of Dirac, which is one of the primary reasons why I went for the NAD. But at the end of the day, it is simply a means of adding eq (and phase shifting) to improve frequency response of a speaker/room system, this sort of dynamic room 'tuning' has been a staple part of any live sound engineering to reduce feedback and resonant frequencies for a long time. Nothing to get too excited about!
sounds like you may have faulty unit,the nad takes a bit of time to get used to but i am delighted with it now,had it a month now,arc is all over the place but there is a work around see post #2,137 works great.NAD T758v3 - Dolby Atmos 7.1.4 - Dirac Live
 

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